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What's the difference, please?


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17 replies to this topic

#1 Reena

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 09:39 AM

My present PC is 6 years old this April. It has given excellent service but I know that soon I shall have to think of a replacement.

I have been reading reviews of various PC's but am confused by the terms which, I think/hope describes the processor.

For instance, we have the Intel Pentium, Intel Core (Duo & Quad); Intel Core i5 and Intel Core i7.

I realise the old maxim "you get what you pay for", will operate but which of the above is the most powerful and the one to buy?

I use the computer on a daily basis, for pleasure. I play one or two games and I store photographic images on it which I enjoy editing. A "good" graphics card is essential but that's another question! I want a PC that will last two years at least.

I welcome your comments and advice.

My thanks in advance.

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#2 Kyle B

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 11:31 AM

The sequence in which you wrote out the processors indicate which is slowest and which is fastest.

However, if you're going for a Duo or Quad, do NOT forget the 2. In other words, pay attention to whether it's Core 2 Duo or Core Duo. There is a difference. The i7 is Intel's "enthusiast" CPU, meaning that it's ideal for those who like to tweak around with their computers or run intensive games. The i5, then, is like a slightly toned-down version of the i7.

Personally, I'd simply stick to Core 2 Quad. I'm running a Core 2 Quad desktop, and with a GeForce GTS 250 and 1GB Video RAM, I have (almost) no issues playing the latest games at the highest settings. It is my opinion that future processors won't make huge leaps like they did in the 90s.

But that's solely my opinion. If someone has more knowledge, feel free to correct me.

#3 Reena

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 05:28 PM

Thank you, Kyle, for the information.

Have to confess that I fancy the i7 as, hopefully, this will last some years. I don't play intensive games, as yet (!), but should the need arise..........:blink:)

Edited by Reena, 25 March 2010 - 05:32 PM.


#4 strolln

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 08:13 AM

Keep in mind that the better of a computer you buy now, the longer it should last before becoming a dinosaur. I recently bought a new computer and went with an i7 (quad core) because it should "keep up" over a longer time than a dual core would. You could save money now with a dual core but would probably be looking to upgrade again sooner.
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#5 Reena

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 06:01 AM

Yes, Strolln, I have considered that. My present PC, a Medion, was a very "powerful" PC when I bought it six years ago. It has paid off and I am reluctant to change my old friend. I have added extra memory over the years and that was a good thing to do also.

At the moment I have been reading about i5 and i7 PC's offered by a firm called Cube. Don't know them but they list all components by name. I believe all PC "firms" buy all the components anyway.

I try to read reviews but often these are off-putting as customer service is slated. I reckon only the ones who are dissatisfied comment ; the "happy" customers don't bother.

Thank you for taking the time and trouble to post your comment.

#6 fallendream

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:12 PM

for money, and if you are a casual user (not a high-spec gamer) the best bets are AMD processors (usually almost as good as intel but alot cheaper) and seagate are usually affordable for HDD.
If you have limited computer knowledge or want the gaurentee of being able to get better support (with an extended warranty ofcourse ;)) then you should buy a ready-built PC.

ofcourse on all PCs consider buying an extra fan to keep it cool - it can also make a PC last longer :blink:

#7 Reena

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:42 PM

Fallendream: I have no intention of building a PC as I don't have the knowledge. I have bought computers since 1998 and just had memory added to them if needed.

I have a Seagate hard disk bought about two weeks ago as I would hate to lose some of my purchased downloaded software and my photographs. It's a really natty accessory and has its own docking station though it takes two of my USB ports!

Thanks for the advice.

#8 s1lents0ul

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 06:55 PM

you can get a USB HUB, if your bothered by the amount of USB ports your Hard Drive takes from your computer.
==]--s1lents0ul-->

#9 Reena

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 09:31 AM

s1lents0ul: I do have a USB hob but the USB ports are erratic: sometimes they work; sometimes they don't!


All:


Is there anything about the following specifications that you would change, please?

Intel® Core™ i5 750 Quad Core Processor (2.66GHz, 8MB Cache) - LGA1156
Microsoft® Windows® 7 Home Premium pre-installed
Midi-Tower ATX Chassis with 550W PSU - Piano Black
ASUS P7P55 LX Mainboard - Intel Core™ i5 / i7 - LGA 1156 / ATX
4GB 1333MHz Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM - (2x2GB)
2x 500GB Serial ATA Hard Drive with 16MB Buffer (1TB Total)
Raid 0 Configuration (Stripe)
22x Dual Layer DVD Writer Super Format +R/-R/RW/RAM
1GB ATI Radeon HD5450 Graphics Accelerator GDDR3
7.1 High Definition onboard sound card - for 8 Channel Cinema sound
1 Year Return to Base Hardware Warranty - inc 3 Months Free Collect & Return
Fast Track: Ready to Ship - usually 48hrs delivery (RTS)


Standard features:

Free Microsoft® Works 9 + Limited Microsoft Office Trial
Free Cyberlink Video Editing Utility Suite - 7 titles (oem)
BullGuard Internet Security ver. 9 - 90 Day Trial - AntiVirus/Firewall/Backup/Spamfilter
14 USB 2.0 ports (6 ports at mid-board, 8 ports at back panel) - ASUS P7P55DM /LE
Network Ready PCIe Gigabit LAN

#10 s1lents0ul

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 10:09 AM

i would change your RAID setup. You have a higher rsk of data loss with RAID 0

RAID 0
RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across multiple disks in a way that gives improved speed at any given instant. If one disk fails, however, all of the data on the array will be lost, as there is neither parity nor mirroring. In this regard, RAID 0 is somewhat of a misnomer, in that RAID 0 is non-redundant. A RAID 0 array requires a minimum of two drives. A RAID 0 configuration can be applied to a single drive provided that the RAID controller is hardware and not software (i.e. OS-based arrays) and allows for such configuration. This allows a single drive to be added to a controller already containing another RAID configuration when the user does not wish to add the additional drive to the existing array. In this case, the controller would be set up as RAID only (as opposed to SCSI only (no RAID)), which requires that each individual drive be a part of some sort of RAID array.

RAID 1
RAID 1 mirrors the contents of the disks, making a form of 1:1 ratio realtime backup. The contents of each disk in the array are identical to that of every other disk in the array. A RAID 1 array requires a minimum of two drives.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

In Addition, if you are paying more for the 90 day trial of Bullguard, i would recommend you either buy a Security Suite or Use one thats Completely free available online.
==]--s1lents0ul-->

#11 Reena

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 05:11 PM

s1lents0ul: That information is new to me. Thank you. I have checked the link.

The problem is, the PC I am interested in is already built and I don't think I could change any of the components. That is why I asked about the specifications.

I don't even recall seeing a RAID set-up mentioned in the description of my old PC.

#12 s1lents0ul

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 05:17 PM

Your 6 year old PC most likely wouldn't have RAID unless you installed it yourself.

you can change the RAID 0 to your PC having 2 Hard drives that operate separately from each other, like they normally would without the RAID controller, i do not know how to do that. I will look it up and try to figure it out for you, but i have never actually done it physically before.

Edited by s1lents0ul, 02 April 2010 - 05:21 PM.

==]--s1lents0ul-->

#13 Reena

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 06:25 AM

I don't have enough computer knowledge to install anything, I am afraid.
To be honest, I wouldn't want to tackle the task.If I go for that package I would have to accept what it offers.

My own PC seems to have picked up a new lease of life since I started thinking about changing it!

Thank you again, s1lents0ul

#14 Reena

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Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:03 AM

I like the "sound" of this one:

YOYOtech INTEL WARBIRD i750X - CUSTOM GAMING PC DESKTOP - PS02 CASE / 550W PSU / INTEL i5-750 CPU (O/C @ 4Ghz) / 4GB MEMORY / 500GB HARD DRIVE / RADEON 5850 - 1GB GRAPHICS / DVD WRITER / ONBOARD SOUND / NO WINDOWS

#15 s1lents0ul

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 08:49 AM

Your Welcome Reena.

That computer does not come with windows, is that a problem for you? You would have to buy your own copy and install it yourself.
==]--s1lents0ul-->




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