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Replacing Processor


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#1 joebeaven

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 05:56 AM

Hi,

I have an Intel E4400 Core2 Duo processor (2.0GHz, 800MHz FSB, 2MB Cache, Dual Core. 64bit Processor Extension Socket: 775) which I've been using for about two years with my ASUS P5N-E S motherboard. I have the opportunity to replace it with a barely used Intel Q8300 Core 2 Quad (2.50GHz/4M/1333/05A). I have a few questions about this:

1. Will it make much of a difference to the speed of my computer?

2. I have not heatsink for the new processor. Can I just use the one I currently have installed?

3. Will I need to do anything to the computer after installing, or will it just work?

Thanks,
Joe

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 06:22 AM

I didn't see it on the CPU support list, but it should work. Upgrade your BIOS before you swap CPUs.

If you are video encoding or gaming you should see improvement (depending on videocard). Otherwise it's hard to tell the difference. I would be concerned about running any stock Intel cooler, but monitor your temps. You might get away with it.

As you already are running a dual core, that quad should be a drop in replacement (assuming the BIOS is updated).

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#3 joebeaven

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 10:12 AM

OK thanks, how do I update the BIOS?

#4 Sobeysboy

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 03:46 PM

You can update your BIOS a couple of different ways:

1) Using a flashdrive: download the .zip (BIOS) file to a flashdrive, unzip this file to reveal the .ROM file within, then use the EZ-Flash utility within the BIOS to flash the BIOS.

2) ASUS Update: flash the BIOS using this program (within Windows).

Most people (including myself) will use the EZ-Flash utility to flash their BIOS
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#5 joebeaven

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 10:10 AM

I used the EZ-Flash 2 utility with a floppy disk. It went fine. The BIOS was updated and the computer restarted. After it restarted however, I got a message saying that the computer couldn't start and I would need to restore the default settings. I went to setup and restored the default settings and now whenever I try to start my computer, I get the following error: "DISK BOOT FAILURE, INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER".

Please can someone tell me how I can stop this from happening and get my computer to start up normally?

#6 MrBruce1959

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 10:38 AM

When you flashed your BIOS chip, the first thing you should have done was started the BIOS setup utility at boot up and at the main BIOS screen hit the F5 key, which loads the setup defaults.
Then F10 which saves the settings and exits.

Where we stand now, is you have to try my instructions below.

Warning: Before proceeding with any attempts to repair or modify the inside of any computer, be sure to ground yourself to the computer's case before and at all times while you are performing this task.
The human body is capable of storing lethal amounts of static electricity, which is capable of destroying the sensitive electronic components located inside a computer.

Instructions:

Locate your CMOS battery and observe how it is installed, make note of this and remove the battery from the motherboard.

Locate on the motherboard a jumper with the words CLR CMOS next to them, there should be 3 pins in a row with a plastic looking jumper on two of them, move this jumper over to the middle pin and pin opposite of where it was, let stand for 5 minutes.

Return this jumper back to its original pin setting, replace your CMOS battery just as it was before you removed it.

Start the computer and hold down the key for entering the BIOS setup utility, it is either F2 or the Delete key.

Your time and date need to be fixed as it was reset and will be wrong.

Hit your F5 key this will load Setup defaults If there is another option located at the bottom of your BIOS menu called load system defaults choose that option also.

Now hit the F10 this will pop a box up saying the following SAVE CHANGES TO CMOS AND EXIT? Type Y for yes.

Your computer should now reboot.


Let us know if this fixed your problem.
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#7 joebeaven

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 12:55 PM

There are two jumpers like that on the motherboard, but neither of them say "CLR CMOS" next to them One says "USBPW1-4" next to it, and the other says "KBPWR" next to it. Is it one of those?

#8 MrBruce1959

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:17 PM

There are two jumpers like that on the motherboard, but neither of them say "CLR CMOS" next to them One says "USBPW1-4" next to it, and the other says "KBPWR" next to it. Is it one of those?


No one of those is USB related, the other is keyboard related.

Give me a few minutes to grab a copy of your motherboard book, so I can check on the jumpers location for you.

I will post back as soon as I find it.
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#9 MrBruce1959

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:35 PM

Found it its named differently.

It is located on the board near where your SATA drives connect to the motherboard.

The jumper is called CLRTC please follow my instructions again above using the CLTRC jumper instead, move from pins 1-2 to pins 2-3 (make sure you remove that battery!!!!)

Edited by MrBruce1959, 30 March 2010 - 02:51 PM.

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#10 dpunisher

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:49 PM

Before you clear the CMOS, make sure you don't have any other disks in your CD/DVD drive, USB drive or floppy if equipped. Reboot.

CLRTC jumper to clear CMOS/BIOS. Lower right near SATA plugs.

Edited by dpunisher, 30 March 2010 - 02:50 PM.

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#11 joebeaven

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:21 AM

I followed the instructions, but it hasn't helped. I'm still getting the same disk boot error.

#12 MrBruce1959

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 09:49 AM

OK, now from my understanding your BIOS is booting OK, so that means your BIOS flash went OK.

OK so now we need to look in your BIOS setup utility and make sure your drive is accessible.

I am using a copy of your motherboard manual here.

Enter the BIOS setup utility.

On the first screen which is labeled Main at the top of your screen, scroll down until you have Primary IDE channel hi-lighted, hit the Enter key on each IDE channel down the list make sure each is set to Auto If you have an IDE hard drive on any of those channels, it should display that drives information such as number of Cylinders Heads Sectors etc.

Make sure if you're using an E-IDE hard drive on this system that it registers something under Primary IDE channel.

If your hard drives are SATA drives.

Scroll down to the SATA 1 and hit Enter while SATA 1 is hi-lighted again make sure this is set to Auto

If your hard drive is SATA, there should be the same thing I listed above for the E-IDE drive, it should list the drives Cylinders Heads etc.

If nothing shows up on any of those channels IDE or SATA. Then your hard drive's controller chip has failed. The hard drive in this case has to be replaced.

If however it does show up in one of the fields, then you will next have to move from the Main menu at top of the BIOS screen to the BOOT menu.

Make sure the hard drive is selected as the first on the list of BOOT drives, there should be an option of 4 devices, there is a possibility of having your optical drive or floppy disk selected as the first device, but make sure there are NO disks in those drives when trying to boot to the hard drive.

But the boot hard drive should be selected as option # 1 or option #2 in the boot order.

Any changes you have made to the BIOS require you to hit the F-10 key, this brings up the question from the BIOS asking if you want save the changes to the CMOS chip and exit here you would type Y for yes.

Your computer will now reboot and look for the first bootable device you selected in the Boot menu and go down that list until it finds a boot execute command from one of the drives, if this fails to be found, then we need to repair your hard drives boot sector and or master boot record. Which is possible, however I would rather wait and post that information, once you have posted back the results after trying what I have already asked you to try and it fails to correct your problem.

Good luck and any ferther questions just ask.
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#13 joebeaven

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 02:45 PM

I looked at the BIOS setup utility and everything looked fine there, so I thought I'd try starting up with just the C drive plugged in. I did so and it started up normally. I then reattached each of the hard drives one at a time, restarting after each one and now everything's running correctly. I have also installed the new CPU without any problems.

Thank you very much for your help. :thumbsup:

Edited by joebeaven, 31 March 2010 - 02:48 PM.





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