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Windows 7 anit-virus


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#1 CHansohn

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 10:58 AM

I'm looking for a free anti-virus program that is rather light in size but is secure (I know oxymoron). Over half of my computer boot time I figure is just loading the anti-virus. I currently use Avast and was wondering if there are any good free light ones out there so my computer can boot in reasonable time. I remember hearing that Microsoft security essentials is pretty small but I am not sure how secure it is. any advice would be great.

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#2 keyboardNinja

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 11:47 AM

I don't trust security products made by the author of the most exploited operating systems out there (Microsoft Windows). Third party anti-virus software is the only way to go, in my opinion. I've read plenty of opinions that go both ways about MSE, but I'll never trust it. If they supposedly know enough to make a reliable security product, then they should be smart enough to make Windows more secure. Then we wouldn't need their supposedly good security software!! It's somewhat of an oxymoron, as well.

I tried Avast once myself, and was also disappointed by the performance (or lack thereof).

Before you start looking for a new anti-virus, try this:

Start Menu > type Services > hit Enter

Look for the Avast service(s) in the list (there may be more than one). Double-click it (if multiple, then one at a time) and change the Startup type to Automatic (Delayed). This will give Windows time to load fully before trying to load the anti-virus service(s). It will still take the same amount of time to load the program, but maybe the sum of the parts is gentler than the whole (Windows will be done loading, then the anti-virus starts to load about a minute later; instead of both trying to load at the same time).

If you still find the performance unsatisfying, we'll start to discuss your other options (lighter anti-virus programs). :thumbsup:
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#3 garmanma

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 11:53 AM

Microsoft Security Essentials Overview is basically a stripped-down version of OneCare aimed at users who either canít or don't want to pay for antivirus/anti-malware software.

Microsoft Security Essentials auto-updates once every 24 hours and there is no setting within MSE to change the scheduled time or frequency. See the MSE Definitions/Signatures Update FAQ. However, you can always manually download the latest Microsoft Security Essentials updates from the Microsoft Malware Protection Center Portal.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

As a general rule, using more than one anti-spyware program like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, SuperAntispyware, Spybot S&D, Ad-Aware, etc will not conflict with each other or your anti-virus if using only one of them for real time protection and others as stand-alone scanners. In fact, doing so increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system that can occur when using more than one anti-virus. The overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware. However, if using all their real-time resident shields (TeaTimer, Ad-Watch, MBAM Protection Module, Spyware Terminator Shields, etc) together at the same time, there can be conflicts when each application tries to compete for resources and exclusive rights to perform an action. Additionally, competing tools may even provide redundant alerts which can be annoying and/or confusing.

I recommend Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and taking advantage of the Protection Module which uses advanced heuristic scanning technology to monitor your system and provide real-time protection to prevent the installation of most new malware. This technology monitors every process and stops malicious processes before they can infect your computer. Enabling the Protection Module feature requires reqistration and purchase of a license key that includes free lifetime upgrades and support. After activation, Malwarebytes can be set to update itself and schedule scans automatically on a daily basis. The Protection Module is not intrusive as it utilizes few system resources and should not conflict with other scanners or anti-virus programs.

See Bleeping Computer's Freeware Replacements For Common Commercial Apps and List of Virus & Malware Resources.

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#4 keyboardNinja

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 12:50 PM

I agree 100% with the above quote.
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#5 CHansohn

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 02:38 PM

Ok I remember hearing somewhere that you should never use anti-spyware programs instead of anti-virus programs. whats the difference? don't they both have a firewall and anti-virus/spyware definitions?

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#6 keyboardNinja

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 06:17 PM

Difference between anti-virus and anti-spyware

Sometimes a firewall does come bundled with a security product like an anti-virus program, but that is not always the case. Windows has a built-in firewall, but some people chose to disable it and use a third-party firewall instead (another perfectly viable option).

To respond to your statement, no, you can't use only an anti-spyware program in place of an anti-virus program. They complement each other (are usually meant to be run at the same time).

Security software can be a combination of any (and not necessarily all) of the following: anti-virus, anti-spyware, firewall, etc...

Edited by keyboardNinja, 12 March 2010 - 06:21 PM.

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