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Networking Question


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7 replies to this topic

#1 alm64goat

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 08:48 AM

I have a friend who has a small business network with a server and 3 workstations running a business application. The server is 10 years old and running UNIX which I know nothing about. They also have a stand alone computer that is attached to a dsl router for internet access. They have decided that they want internet access on the other three computers. So we bought a wireless router and adapters for the three computers and I setup a wireless network. This setup was a problem from the beginning and what I finally determined was that the wireless would work if I took the ip address/subnet/and default gateway information out of the wired LAN. As soon as I put the information back into the wired lan the wireless connection would not work. So I am guessing I probably can't have two default gateways on the same network. I really need a solution for this does anybody have a suggestion as to how I can set this up??

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#2 Ken-in-West-Seattle

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 09:30 AM

For a detailed fix we have to know a bit more about the network.

The working dsl router, brand and model will tell us what the original is capable of.

Does your dsl include more than one public ip from the isp? If it has only one then everything downstream has to be NAT and the original router is probably doing that already.

The wireless router is capable of being configured as a extended AP on the original router and passing dhcp requests back to the primary, but knowing what hardware and firmware is on each piece will allow me to point you to walkthroughs and tutorials for your specific options. If you are already reading similar info on the net, the key might be that you connect the output from the upstream or border router to a regular ethernet port on the wireless router rather than the WAN port. This allows the wireless to act as a switch rather than try to route traffic through another NAT device. (which can be done but is not simple to set up on most SOHO type routers.)

Check the linux server to see if it has a public ip or a NAT ip by using any login (may require sudo or root access on some configurations) type "ifconfig" without the quotes and look at the entries for eth0 (and eth1 if there)

If it is NAT, and static, then you want all the other machines to get addresses in the same range. You will also need a couple of different kinds of security settings on your wireless router if you don't want a random wardriver to have the same access that your do.

#3 alm64goat

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 10:44 AM

The DSL Router is a D-link DIR-628.

There is no other router. Only the DSL router and it is setup on a computer that is NOT on the network it is standalone.

The network itself is 3 computers linked to a server by a hub. The server is not hooked up to the DSL router at all. So it is basically like I am trying to run two different separate networks. One is wired and one is wireless.

Maybe a simple solution would be to just connect the dsl router to the server, but like I stated before I have no idea how to set that up on linux. I just thought this would be simple with an existing wireless network to just add the other 3 computers so that they had internet through the wireless connection and then they also had access to the wired network as well. Maybe it can't be done.

#4 CaveDweller2

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 11:19 AM

So I am assuming that they have static IP addresses. If you set all of them to auto except the server, plug the DSL modem into the hub the addressing will take care of itself for the PCs and they will all get online. But they probably won't be able to connect to the server.

The server, you'll want to keep it a static IP address but you might have to change it to match what the router will hand out. I'm fairly sure that no matter which distro Linuix it is running the command will be the same. This site seems to be a good place to start.

But check what the IP address is the DSL router is giving and what the LAN is set to before you go making changes, you may not have to make any changes. If the LAN is set up with 192.168.1.X and the router gives out 192.168.1.X then just plugging it in, as I said, might get them online.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#5 Ken-in-West-Seattle

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 12:57 PM

who currently does the linux admin stuff? They should know how to either match the workstations to the existing dsl or how to add another ip to the linux interface.

What is the DSL router and how is it connected now? Which isp? Most isp's will not route multiple networks and some will not route multiple ip addresses.

In a production environment, you better get a blanket immunity from the owner before you start taking our advice for a system we cannot see and you aren't giving full info for.

While networking is not wizardry, it will seem like it to those who are not experienced with the details of the command line. Modern SOHO and home routers cover up the really confusing heart of it and make everything seem "simple". It is possible for experienced professional admins to screw the pooch in ways that take hours to recover...

What most people do with wireless routers IS really simple. But the underlying software is still there to bite you if you screw up.

If the owner insist on you doing this, make sure you know how to backup the config on the dsl and wireless routers and that the linux server admin is consulted.


What does the server do? Does it run some app that the workstations access directly? (like ADP or travel agency booking software)? Is it a turnkey hardware and software solution from a vender? Is it SCO UNIX? You better make sure the linux machine is firewalled and hardened before you hang it out on the net or someone else will own it before lunch.

#6 alm64goat

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 03:24 PM

This server was setup by the software company they bought it from. It runs a business app directly, exactly what you suspected. And it is SCO UNIX. They(the software company) administer any software related problems over a modem. I have taken care of any hardware issues. Believe me it has not been fun or ideal, but I am just trying to do my best for them.

The DSL router is a D-link DIR 628 and the isp is Verizon.

I am not worried on the wireless end of this as I feel relatively comfortable with that. However I am not comfortable with the linux at all that is why I have been trying to work around using the server. And as you stated the server is not firewalled or protected at this point.

As far as the ip config, all of the workstations have static ip addresses and the dsl router is dhcp.

Workstations: 125.1.1.11
Subnet: 255.0.0.0
Gateway 124.1.1.2

Wireless 192.168.0.190
Subnet 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.0.1

Guess there really isn't a good way to do this??

#7 CaveDweller2

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 03:44 PM

Millions of companies have servers and their workstations are online so what you are doing is completely normal. You are not messing with the server or the workstations in such a way that the program(s) they need the server for can't be run. All you are doing is changing addresses.

You'll need to talk to the company that controls the server because to do what you need done has to be done by an admin or at least it should be. Also they are the ones that would need to do anything extra security wise. So what I would do is contact them to make any changes after business hours.

Honestly, this is REALLY simple. You plug the DSL modem into the hub, set each PC to Obtain their IP and DNS auto, set the server with an address that is in the same network and its done. When they come in the next day, they'll all be online and you'll be "The Man" or woMan whichever.

Start with a call or email to the server control company. Go from there. Do not let Linux/Unix scare you. Its a fairly logical OS.

Edited by CaveDweller2, 10 March 2010 - 03:45 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#8 Ken-in-West-Seattle

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 09:30 PM

125.1.1.11 sounds like terminals or pc running terminal client software.




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