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BUILDING FASTEST COMPUTER! (help needed)


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#1 techtic

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 08:02 PM

what's up everyone i'm new to computer building and i want to purchase the right parts for the fastest computer for the cheapest price possible. i want to get a computer that i wont have to wait for booting, transferring files, surfing the web, etc... i'm starting in my head to pay up to 500$ U.S. but if things speed up much or even a little more with the shelling out of more cash i'd for sure consider it because time is money.

i know this is a very general question but i'm willing to read up a lot on the different aspects of computers if you give me the links.

so where do we start... is there any downside to building a comp yourself besides having to put in the work? from what i know the parts purchased separately are much cheaper than buying them together, let alone put together in a laptop and that's why my plan is to put the computer together myself.

anyways, i appreciate anything you can do to help. thanks a lot in advance.

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 07:08 AM

so where do we start... is there any downside to building a comp yourself besides having to put in the work? from what i know the parts purchased separately are much cheaper than buying them together........


The main downside to building your own system is that you are your own customer support. The positive side is the wait times to the call center to talk with someone you cannot understand are eliminated.

For budget systems the cost is never cheaper to build your own. When you start building higher end systems is where savings are realized. No way to compete on parts prices with an OEM that buys 100K units at a time.

Read through this forum as there are planty of great build suggestions.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 05:34 PM

That is true, the downside is having to take care of all the problems, like driver issues. when you buy a OEM computer, the manufactuerer has already tested everything and the drivers to make it work, with a custom, the drivers have not necessarily all been tested and may conflict with the other drivers. More often then not they don't and everything installs in a breeze, but it does happen. And it is hard to compete with OEM manufacturers pricewise on a budget system-it really is, that is new, quality wise though, if you do your research, youll be getting more for your money. heres some quick tips of what to look for and think about:

#1 do your research on the parts thoroughly before you order to make sure theyre good quality and compatible.

#2 never, NEVER skimp on the power supply or the motherboard. I usually recomend using a good quality brand, like coolermaster, Antec, OCZ, or corsair for the power supply, and good motherboards include Gigabyte and ASUS. and make sure your power supply has enough power, both wattage wise, and amperage wise to run your system.

#3 Decide ahead of time what CPU you want to use. Intel right now, is the more popular CPU with probably a bit of a performance gain, but AMD is much cheaper and can still do pretty much anything you need it to. Keep in mind high quality motherboards for AMD are also cheaper then intel boards.

#4 memory wise, this is one area you can skimp on first if you cant afford it, because its easy to upgrade later. Typically though you want to find the memory with the best compination of clock speed and timings possible. You want the fastest possible clock speed with the lowest possible timings available that you can afford. there are a lot of good brands of ram out there, I typically trust Patriot, Corsair, OCZ, G.Skill, and for general purposes, kingston.

#5 how much hard drive space do you need? Hard drives start at about 40 bucks for a 160 gb hard drive and go on up. Good brands that I trust are Western digital and seagate.

#6 graphics. How much graphics power do you need? are you willing to use the integrated? integrated doesnt perform as well as a dedicated card and slows down your system a bit, though if your just lookin for something to surf the web and do microsoft office you probably won't even notice. A dedicated card on the other hand, will cost more, but improve your over all PC performance, and if your wanting to game, a definite must. If you get a dedicated card, make sure your PSU can handle it. Good card manufacturers with ATI chipsets include Saphire, Gigabyte, and ASUS, good manufacturers with NVIDIA chipsets include EVGA, PNY, and gigabyte.

anyway, building your own, while being a bit of work, can be a rewarding task. Think about exactly what you want in a system here, and we can make some suggestions. :D

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#4 techtic

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 02:57 PM

thanks a lot guys.

the truth is, i'm not sure how good i want my system to be-pretty much the way i see it i'm looking for the fastest system possible so i won't have to wait for things to load, boot times, surfing the web,etc... how much faster does the pc get, if any faster, once i spend over 500$ to get a pricier computer?

is it more expensive to buy pc parts separately rather than already built from an OEM even though i already have windows? because that's about a hundred dollars right there, if i'm correct

Edited by techtic, 12 March 2010 - 03:03 PM.


#5 dpunisher

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 04:37 PM

...................how much faster does the pc get, if any faster, once i spend over 500$ to get a pricier computer?


For the basics you specified, spending more than $500 might not get you much more. Any reasonably modern build with a dual/quadcore CPU, 4 gigs of RAM, SATA hard drive, and even onboard video, will serve your needs. You start spending the big bucks when you start playing games (higher end videocards and CPUs). $500 should buy a pretty good quality/reliable setup that will be futureproof (for the next couple of years anyway).

How many parts are you going to recycle? Will you be using the same monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers, or optical drives? That is something to take into account when pricing a prebuilt vs a homebuilt rig. I can easily build you a tower for <$500, but ask me to include a 24" monitor and thumping 5.1 speaker setup with that, and it becomes a bit harder (well, about impossible actually)to do.

What OS do you have? Is it 32 or 64 bit? Is it retail?

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#6 Blaze413

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 06:33 PM

i actually have put together a build i hope to get done soon for someone and is about $680 with shipping....with 4gb ddr3 and good case and psu and all that stuff with 64bit os ithis price also includes a 20in monitor.....onboard video though and is only ment for work purposes but im sure it can handle a good bit of stuff.....but i found i cant get under 680 without getting cheaper off brand things which i dont want to do....so if u need moniter and parts for pc i dont think u can go under$625...just my opinion though

here is what i have in the build for the guy:



http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16827140041 dvd drive

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16811119161 case...free shipping is main reason

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16822136098 WD HDD 320gb

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16824236063 monitor 20in

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16813131398 motherboard...good on board video and ddr3

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820211409 4gb ddr3 ram

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819103681 dual core processor

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817182044 500w psu (500w should be enough for later additions too)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16832116754 64-bit windows 7 home premium


$670.91 without shipping
$688.64 with shipping

i hope this helps!!!

#7 techtic

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 02:25 PM

blaze:
what's the downside of getting offbrand sutff? does it have a bigger chance of breaking or is it just a more famous company everyone's heard of? because if they both have long warranties i wouldnt mind getting the cheaper brand.

the_patriot:
thanks a lot for your tips. do you mind giving me the quick tips on what to look for in a good motherboard, cpu, ram, hard drive, videocard and case and also how to tell if they're future-proo,f if they're current, or if they'll only work with old gear?

dpunisher:
how expensive is a laptop that'll suit my needs? and when you say that 500$ is good enough for my setup, will it also be a speeding fast setup or just the average fast setup that most people have? i'm planning on recycling everything you said-the monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers, case, and cd-drive (old ones are easily compatible with new computers, right?). i've got both 32 and 64 bit windows 7, though if i'm correct, the only setup for over 4 gb of RAM is with the 64 bit setup.

#8 Blaze413

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 07:52 PM

off-brands r ok...there just seems to be a greater chance of getting a defective product and then having to wait for the new one to come in etc.. it sucks to have everything hooked up to find the psu of something is malfunctioning.....with name-brand things u usually find that they last a lot longer because they dont skimp on the parts to build their products just to make them cheaper.....also name-brand companies r better about getting u a new product faster if one does malfunction. You may be paying a little more but take for instance the psu....u pay for a cheap off-brand one and it lasts just outside the warranty u have to pay for another ne and then have to go through with all the trouble of shipping and then re-installing, where as if u pay a little bit more for a brand such as coolmaster, coarsier, silverstone, ect....they may last for a very long time.

hope i didnt get to confusing :thumbsup:

#9 Koinos

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 04:12 PM

techtic, best suggestion is read up on your subject. Way more information out there then you could every read and with new hardware coming out almost daily you'll most likely never get the latest and greatest up and working before the next best thing is available.
If you want a idea on cost to performance I'd suggest checking some of the articles at Tom's Hardware and specifically for you check this link;
http://www.tomshardware.com/theme-build-your-own,156.html The latest is from their Build Your Own done at the end of 2009. Articles are well written and offer lots of information. Every user has there own idea of what the 'perfect PC' would be.

When I'm trying to decide between two types of hardware, say which motherboard, I always check the user reviews on newegg. You can find a wealth of information from current owners in those reviews. If you have questions on specific items post it here and I'm sure someone will be able to provide you some guidance or a possible alternative.
As far as checking prices I use http://www.pricewatch.com/ for comparison. Always take shipping costs into consideration.

Good luck!
Quote to ponder;
Jack Sparrow: Me? I'm dishonest, and a dishonest man you can always trust to be dishonest. Honestly. It's the honest ones you want to watch out for, because you can never predict when they're going to do something incredibly... stupid.

#10 Venek

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:00 PM

The main downside to building your own system is that you are your own customer support. The positive side is the wait times to the call center to talk with someone you cannot understand are eliminated.


:thumbsup:

You said it! In fact, that's exactly how I started my foray into upgrading and system building! Thank Dell's customer support, circa 1999!
UberGeeks of the world...UNITE!

Uh guys? Wanna take your eyes off that screen for a second? Raise the mice? Battle cry?

#11 the_patriot11

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 02:31 AM

as far as in ofbrands, depends on what. I recomend NEVER skimping on the motherboard or the PSU. using an offbrand in those categories is likely to lead to nightmeres down the road. Hard drives again iffy, greater chance of losing your information. Video cards, depends, if your wanting a high performance build, stick with the name brands, just looking for something to surf the web, you may be able to get away with an off brand there. Same with memory. Optical drives are a dime a dozen, nice and cheap not losing much with a off brand there, as well as card readers. as far as things to look for:

Power supplies: I tend to trust Coolermaster, Antec, Corsair, and OCZ power supplies. I rarely venture from these, with coolermaster being my number one trusted brand. Wattage is important you want enough wattage to handle the sytem in key, but amperage, especially on the +12v rails is important to. I tend to like PSUs with multiple 12v rails, with at least 4 for gaming rigs, with a minimum of 18 amps per rail, 2 +12v rails at 18amps for a generic system. The new thing however is a single 12v rail with high amps, and this is a good way of doing it as well-particularly for overclockers, but I wouldnt even look at it if it has less then 30 amps on the rail. Another thing to look for is the efficiency rating. a PSU with a 70% efficiency rating will work in a bottom of the line system, but anything performance or that will be on a lot you will want a 80+ rating as far as efficiency. Also make sure the PSU has the proper PSU connectors (4 pin or 8 pin depending on the CPU your using) enough 4 pin molex adaptors, sata connectors, and enough PCI_E connectors depending on the system.

Motherboards: the brands I recomend are usually Gigabyte or ASUS. Ive been recomending Biostar for generic builds, but have been having issues with their lack of customer service. What to look for here, personally, I prefer ATX factor motherboards, with lots of room for expansion. if your a gamer, you want multiple PCI express 16 slots, supporting either SLI or crossfire depending on whether your a NVIDIA or ATI fan, even if your only starting with a single card, that way you can add another later. if your not looking at gaming, a single x16 slot will do you fine. I like there to be at least 4 memory slots typically to allow for future expansion. These days to future proof, your probably going to want a DDR3 motherboard, though if you cant afford that, DDR2 is still plenty fast. You also want to make sure to get the best chipset you can afford. a basic rule of thumb is the higher the number, the better the chipset. If you plan on overclocking, a motherboard with good heatsinks on the north and south bridge can be a big plus. expansion slots are nice, though PCI is starting to fade out, the boards with more PCI_E x1 x4 or x8 slots will probably be preferable to those with more PCI slots.

Video cards: I tend to trust Saphire and HIS for cards with ATI chipsets and EVGA and PNY for cards with NVIDIA chipsets. The card you want will depend on what your using it for-if its gaming, you probably want something like a ATI 5770 or a NVIDIA 260 or something similar, if not, something like a simple 4670 will do you just fine. Just make sure that the PSU you order can handle the card your ordering and if it takes PCI_E power connectors your PSU has those natively, the adaptors are never a good idea.

Hard drive: not much to worry about here, lot of good brands out there. I typically use western digital, but also have used hitachi, samsung and seagate with good success.

Case: needs to have enough room to install all your components and allow for ample air flow, I like cases with lots of fan mounts, particularly in the 120 mm fan size range. the better you can cool any system the better it will last.

THose are some pointers, Ill try to get on tomorrow night and post some possible builds both intel and AMD for you to look at and what they can do.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#12 rosiesdad

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 02:36 PM

Unless you are a gamer, or just want to learn building you should come out ahead (money wise) buying a BIG NAME with a dual core and lots of RAM all set up and ready to roll.
Dont forget a custom build needs Windows cost factored in. Either that or run linux (free) on top of the cost of parts.

#13 sufe70

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:00 PM

dpunisher-For budget systems the cost is never cheaper to build your own. When you start building higher end systems is where savings are realized. No way to compete on parts prices with an OEM that buys 100K units at a time.

That is simply not true. High end or low end? a savings can be seen greatly seen from buying a box store bundle job and building a budget system.
First off a Onboard video AM3 system can be built for around $350 off new egg. A decent game system can be built for less than $600.(You'd pay $850 to $1000 from a box store for a unit with equal features your home build will have) My prices on builds do not include OS's but for $100 add 7 64 bit.Or if your like me you have a couple XP discs around.
Anyway my build with a 5.5 WEI score on 7 64 bit.
MSI 770-G45 board $82 (Onboard SATA cont, HT 3.0, 16gb ddr3 1600 max, 6 internal SATA ports,9 USB ports,OCing,2 PCIe 2.0 slots)
Phenom IIx2 545. $88 Not the fastest CPU on the market but more than I'll ever need.
WD Caviar 500gb HD OEM $55
4gb Gskill ddr3 1600 $104
ATI 4670 $102 (Wish I would have spent the extra money here on a 4850 but the 4670 gets OK benchmarks)
2 Pioneer DVD combos $70

Thats $501 there(Not including s/h or OS) Very very happy with this build 5.5 on 7's WEI score out of 7.9 Not bad for a budget build. You try to find a bundle from a box store with no onboard video and a decent gig card for under $850. Cannot be done.

Edited by sufe70, 26 March 2010 - 01:21 PM.


#14 the_patriot11

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 08:29 PM

Actually Sufe, both you and dpunisher are right. If all your looking at is price between a custom job and a pre-built, theres really no big difference. But if your looking for bang for buck, theres a huge savings, and I mean HUGE, that is if you use good quality parts, a home built when using quality parts and put together correctly, will outperform, and outlast a similarly priced store bought computer. Pre built, about the only thing your payin for is the fact that someone else already did the work for you.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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