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HP Pavilion dv6810us-- dissassembly issues


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#1 Vanedil

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 10:11 PM

Greetings,


My Pavilion computer had a problem a while ago with the integrated Nvidia card (Go 7150M), that would make the computer have some erratic behavior: it would power up, show no video, or it could loop, turn and power itself down. Searched around, and found out this may due to some faulty Nvidia chips that tend to overheat and all. HP, is taking no responsibility over the matter, so I had to do things on my own.


Took computer to repair shop, and basically they reached the same conclusion as me. However, I was unwilling, unable to pay the $500 dollars they wanted to charge me over a new motherboard. Nonetheless, with their regular procedures, reseating all the stuff and cleaning, the machine was on a stable condition. Meaning, that it would boot up and show video perfectly fine, only issue was that it would be slower than usual.


First thing I did, was update the BIOS and the Nvidia driver, to an installment that was supposed to keep the fan working at a constant speed to prevent the overheating issue. Computer worked well for a month like this.

However, after the month, the computer would simply shut itself down mid use, after 1hr or so of use, and it would progresively degrade this way, shutting itself down right after boot to the point that it reached where all LEDs would turn on, but no POST/boot, as everything, but the power LEDs would shut down.


I tried to reseat all components by dismantling the machine, and wanting to see if the fan was working fine, believing it might have stopped working, because it had been forced to work too much. With I/O panel removed, did some tests and the fan would operate, on the mobo, the flea power LED would turn on momentarily when pressing the power button, etc.


However, after reseating all components, there was absolutely no change in the computer. Same problem. Knowing the issue could be related to mobo and knowing the $500 price tag, not knowing what else to do, I proceeded to dissassemble the machine, this time, when was reassembling, somehow, I managed to get one of the steel clasps that hold down the I/O panel ribbon cables to become embedded into the millimeters thick ribbon cables.


The result is: that now the LEDs won't come on at all, unless you move around the cable. Also, because of a brilliant idea of mine, to try and reseat the CMOS battery, the plastic container has become detached from the mobo. So here is where the real questions begin:



- Read around that on such cases as the faulty Nvidia chips, an alternative was to simply solder the contacts back to mobo. Would you guys advice for this as a plausible alternative?


- If I were to glue the plastic CMOS battery holder with a non-conductive silicon based glue to mobo, while soldering back the contacts, would this get a positive effect?


- Is there any place you people might suggest that is perfect to acquire cheap spare parts, online, to get a replacement for the I/O panel or the ribbon cables?


- To give the heatsink and fan additional support, is there some metallic bar I could attach to computer, to help cool down/dissipate heat of the internal components?

- Would you advice adding some thermal grease to the CPU as a maintenance procedure?


Thank you for your help, and have a nice day

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#2 garmanma

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 10:59 PM

If I were to glue the plastic CMOS battery holder with a non-conductive silicon based glue to mobo, while soldering back the contacts, would this get a positive effect?

That will work

To give the heatsink and fan additional support, is there some metallic bar I could attach to computer, to help cool down/dissipate heat of the internal components?

I wouldn't

Would you advice adding some thermal grease to the CPU as a maintenance procedure?

Clean the old off with alcohol follow these instructions to apply a new drop [too much is no good]
http://www.arcticsilver.com/ins_route_step2intelas5.html

Is there any place you people might suggest that is perfect to acquire cheap spare parts, online,

Ebay Stores not individual sellers
Mark
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#3 Vanedil

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 11:22 PM

Thanks a lot for the suggestions and the quick response.

About the Nvidia chip, do you believe that soldering the contacts to the motherboard may rid of the no video/loop boot issue?


Again, thanks for the help.

#4 dpunisher

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 11:46 PM

There is nothing you can solder on the chip. You might get by with the "oven trick", baking the motherboard to melt the solder, or using a hot air gun on it.

Here is the "bumpgate" saga:
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/1...chips-defective

Edited by dpunisher, 06 March 2010 - 11:46 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#5 garmanma

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 05:59 PM

The heat gun would be more preferable
A little more control
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#6 Vanedil

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 11:22 PM

Well, thanks again for all the responses and help. I will try all your suggestions throughout the weekend.

I must say that it is really ghastly how spread out this nVidia scam is, and how many models of machines from the different companies have been affected. ALso shows you how disposable today's machines are.




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