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motherboards


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#1 annie123

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 01:16 PM

Hi I am studying CompTia A+. The college gives a pic of an ATX motherboard with SIMM connectors. I thought SIMM were only on an AT motherboard. When I queried it they siad it was an early ATX board. But then how can there be a Pentium 4 processor? Please help. Thanks Anne

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#2 dc3

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 02:02 AM

What is the motherboard? The Pentium 4 processor - Intel's "next generation" of processor to succeed the Pentium III and Celeron processors - was released on November 20 2000.

SIMM is a acronym for single in-line memory module, a small circuit board that can hold a group of memory chips. Typically, SIMMs hold up to eight (on Macintoshes) or nine (on PCs) RAM chips. On PCs, the ninth chip is often used for parity error checking. Unlike memory chips, SIMMs are measured in bytes rather than bits. SIMMs are easier to install than individual memory chips.

The bus from a SIMM to the actual memory chips is 32 bits wide. A newer technology, called dual in-line memory module (DIMM), provides a 64-bit bus. For modern Pentium microprocessors that have a 64-bit bus, you must use either DIMMs or pairs of SIMMs.

For a better explanationa read this link: http://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Hardwa...orm_factors.asp

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