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Newbie Network Question


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7 replies to this topic

#1 krh1326

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 11:52 PM

Hello Everyone,

Wierd or noob network question:

I have cable (Optimum Online) internet access. The coaxial cable goes to my cable modem. I have an Ethernet wire going from that, to my Linksys wrt350N wireless router. In the router, I have 4 ethernet connections that I can run to desktops.

I currently have computer A connected to the router. I recently ran a wire through my house to my sons’ room for them to use computer B.

Now my daughter wants a rig setup in her room (Computer C). Do I have to run a new (dedicated) Ethernet wire from my router directly to her room, or can I use some sort of ‘splitter’ at computer B, and then go to new computer C?

The reason I ask is, it is a most difficult wire run, and If I can just go from their room to hers, it would make my life so much easier.

Thank You

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:02 AM

I don't think you can physically split the cable, but you ought to be able to use a switch.

#3 Orecomm

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:25 AM

It is possible, but seriously not advisable, to split the cable. To do so, wire each end to a Cat5 Jack (or plug) using the following pinouts (cut short pieces of the inner conductors for the unused pins, so everything will line up correctly if using plugs) Org/Wht J1-P1, Org J1-P2, Grn/Wht J1-P3, Grn J1-P6, Blu/Wht J2-P1, Blu J2-P2, Brn/Wht J2-P3, Brn J2-P6. This probably won't meet the specs for crosstalk, and don't even try running Gigabit on it, but will generally work for 10/100 connections. It's ugly and non-standard, but hey, so am I, and I still work... :thumbsup:

Daisy chaining connections, like analog phones, won't work (at least not well).

The switch solution is simpler and better. Set the switch near computer B. Connect the existing wire from the Linksys to one port of the switch, and computers B and C to the other ports with standard Cat5 cables.

The third option is to use a wireless card or USB solution for Computer C, since it seems you have a wireless router already.

#4 krh1326

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 06:42 AM

OK, Thank you for that input. Maybe I am asking the question wrong, and using wrong terms. Like I said, I am new to the whole networking thing. I dont want to get into opening up the cable, and altering the wires.

I am asking if there is a spliter, which you are calling a switch, that 1 wire goes into, and 2 come out. Is there such an animal? Can 1 go to comp B, then 1 go to comp C?

Analogy to the analog phone system, was dead on, that was what I was wondering about.

Thanks again.

#5 CaveDweller2

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:44 AM

You mean something like this?

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#6 Orecomm

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 12:35 PM

The cable splitter referred to by CaveDweller2 above does exactly what the pinout I gave you does. You would need one on each end of the cable, along with appropriate connectors and jumper cables. It would get you there, but not as clean and easy as just using the switch he pointed to earlier. It would cost you $22 for the two cables plus probably another $5 for jumpers and connectors, the switch is only $14. No-brainer in my book.

#7 CaveDweller2

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:11 PM

Oh I wasn't suggesting he use it, a switch is the way to go. But he asked if there was such a thing, so I was just being the helpful helper I am and answering his question hehe

Edited by CaveDweller2, 02 March 2010 - 07:35 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#8 Andrew

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:39 PM

So the consensus is a switch. Plug the internet into one end and the computers into the other.




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