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Termination of dllhost.exe


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#1 CPU10

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 07:56 AM

Hello everyone, this is my first post on this forum, but by the look of things there's a lot of savvy people out there who will be able to help me.
I consider myself to maintain good internet security. However recently I did something stupid in the task manager and now the file dllhost.exe has been terminated. It is still on my PC however but I can't get it going again.
This has slowed down my PC and I don't think I should have done it! So I did a system restore and that didn't work, then I did that CMD thing with sfc/scannow, which did not find any integrity violations.
I don't get it... Should I worry about dllhost.exe not running, and if so how do I get it back?

Thanks v much for your advice, CPU

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#2 Layback Bear

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 10:34 AM

Good morning CPU10. Google is our friend. I found this and it might help you.
For more details follow the link given below.

How to use the System File Checker tool to troubleshoot missing or corrupted system files on Windows Vista or on Windows 7

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929833

#3 CPU10

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:12 AM

hey thanks, but I tried that already and it didn't work
I don't have access to copy a copy into the Systems32 folder anyway...
What now?
Cheers

#4 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:17 AM

The dllhost.exe process is amongst the integral components of MS Windows OS versions. Also known as the Microsoft DCOM DLL Host Process, the dllhost.exe application is an OS-initialized file. This means the dllhost.exe process is executed by the MS Windows OS to run during boot time.

The dllhost.exe process is important for the stability and functionality of MS Windows-based machines since it monitors DLL-based activities in the background. Thus, the dllhost.exe file manages the applications installed on the MS Windows-based machine with regards to its DLL-based activities. With this, the dllhost.exe file should not be altered, removed, or renamed in any way. In addition, the dllhost.exe process should not be terminated through the Windows Task Manager since doing so will affect the functionality of the applications running on the MS Windows-based machine, which frequently results to system crashes, data corruption, and registry damage among others.


The "dllhost.exe" process only runs when needed. I realize you terminated the process in the Task Manager, but it should come back when needed. Have you tried rebooting?
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#5 CPU10

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:22 AM

cool thanks!
em do you mean restarting or turning in off via button?

Edited by CPU10, 28 February 2010 - 11:23 AM.


#6 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 01:45 PM

Never do a hard shutdown (holding down the power button) unless you absolutely have to. It is not healthy for the computer. The only time this should be done is if it is unresponsive for a few minutes ("locked up" or "frozen" as I like to say), and you have no other option than to do a hard shutdown. But like I said, don't do it unless you have to.

To "reboot" simply means to go to the Start Menu, click the little arrow next to Shut Down, and click Restart (restart and reboot are interchangeable terms).

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Your computer will close any programs you had open (be sure to save your work), shut down Windows, then boot back into Windows again. You would find it amazing how many things can be fixed by a simple reboot.

You did not kill your computer by terminating that memory process. You just crippled it for a little while. Simply restarting it will fix things. Be careful to not terminate memory processes that you are not familiar with. Most of them you will not recognize because they are Windows-based. They should not be tampered with. The worst that could happen is you crash your computer (I've done it) by terminating a critical system process, and/or possibly corrupt some system files. So don't mess with those. :huh:
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#7 cryptodan

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 02:24 PM

Never do a hard shutdown (holding down the power button) unless you absolutely have to. It is not healthy for the computer. The only time this should be done is if it is unresponsive for a few minutes ("locked up" or "frozen" as I like to say), and you have no other option than to do a hard shutdown. But like I said, don't do it unless you have to.


Actually that is very healthy for the computer. The 5 to 7 seconds is there to have the drives spin down and safely shutdown your machine. It allows the heads to return to their restful state. Its just like using the shutdown/restart method on Windows or any other OS.

#8 Broni

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 02:49 PM

Never do a hard shutdown (holding down the power button) unless you absolutely have to. It is not healthy for the computer.

I absolutely second the above.

CPU10
How do you actually know, dllhost.exe is not running? What are the symptoms?
dllhost.exe file is prone to infections, so you have to make sure it's located in C:\Windows\System32 folder. Any other location is not legit.

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#9 cryptodan

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 03:05 PM

If holding the power button in for 7 seconds was so bad for computing the ATX Standard would not include it.

#10 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 04:36 PM

Its just like using the shutdown/restart method on Windows or any other OS.

No, it's not. The hardware doesn't know the difference between a hard shutdown (power button) and a peaceful shutdown (doing it through Windows). But the software DOES know the difference. That's why you get the "Windows did not shut down successfully" screen when you try to boot after a hard shutdown. It knows that it did not go through the shutdown sequence and things were left "open/unresolved/unfinished". I've had problems before with software (including Windows itself) not working correctly after a hard shutdown. One word of advice: NEVER do a hard shutdown while the system is booting. You will most certainly screw it up. I've done it once, but fortunately System Restore was able to save me. Some things got corrupted and was making things act screwy (the screen resolution being the obvious one). Windows can usually recover from a hard shutdown while it is just running normally (although like I said, you shouldn't do it unless you absolutely have to), but doing it during a boot can render it unoperable. A hard shutdown essentially crashes Windows.

I could see where you might try to argue that a hard shutdown is not harmful for a computer, but I have a hard time believing that you think it is actually healthy for it. Just keep doing it and you'll figure out for yourself whether it is or not.... :huh:

Yeah, that have to make the power button a viable option in the firmware to turn it off, else you would have to unplug it or take out the battery (another thing you shouldn't do) if the OS hung. But that doesn't mean you should use it if you don't have to. It's just the last option. :huh:
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#11 cryptodan

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 04:55 PM

So I guess all the manuals out there that state that holding the power button in is a safe option to shutdown your machine is safe? Im going by years of experience. If you had a hardware issue due to this then maybe the issue persisted before that. Ive done it numerous times on hundreds of systems will no ill effects.

#12 Broni

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 05:39 PM

all the manuals out there that state that holding the power button in is a safe option

I'd like to see a source of the above statement.

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#13 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 05:50 PM

^Ditto

Like I said, if you are comfortable doing it regularly, then don't let me spoil your fun. But I will continue to use it only as a last resort.

And I never said I had a hardware issue. My point was that it is very easy to corrupt software when you force a shutdown (I've seen it happen to multiple computers, not all of them being mine).

But anyway...

Cheers and have a nice day. :huh:
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