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Naming an unallocated partition ?


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#1 nosmiley

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:23 AM

I installed Win 7 ultimate to a clean drive with no partitions. The first time , the install disk devided the drive into two partitions, labeling one Primary, and the other SyS Recovery, without a letter desig. No C, or D. The Sys. Recovery was 100 MB in size, and the primary was the remainder of the hard disk, or 297+ GB. I wanted another partition, so I removed everything and started fresh. This time I reserved 74.22 GB, and let the disk create the Sys recovery 100 MB partition, and a primary of 223.77 GB. Presently Primary & Recovery are healthy, layout simple, type basic, with the 74.22 GB as unallocated. SysRecov is 74% available, & primary is 91% available.
I am hoping with guidance and directions, to have the frequent backups, and restore points sent to the unallocated portion. My previous OS ,factory-installed, Windows Vista sent that stuff to D disk [partition] without my input or directive. After a few months the D disk was full , and the frequent notice popped up advising action on my part, but the Sys.Recovery, wouldn't allow D to open. From what I read on Bleeping, this happened to many others with Vista pre-installed.

Please help me name the partition, and give directions for sending the backups & restore points to this partition. I'm speaking of the backups & restore points that the system does each time you add or remove a new program, run a virus scan etc. plus the backups the system does on a schedule.
Thanks again.

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#2 tekchallenged

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 06:44 AM

As nobody more knowledgeable has come along yet, I'll put my two cents in:

If the space is unallocated, you'd need to create a partition. You can do this in "computer management" (Start - administrative tools - computer management, or search for "computer management" in the search box and then select it.) Right click on the unallocated space and you should get an option to create a partition (I don't have any unallocated space, so I can't tell you exactly what the menu says, but it should be "create partition" or "make partition" or something like that). Just create a partition of the size of your unallocated space. You can call it whatever you like ("Backup" maybe?) and you can give it whatever drive letter that hasn't been used that you like. (I find calling it X: or Y: or something like that makes it clear that it is separate and you don't need to keep thinking "which partition is my stuff on?" when you are saving your data files)

To set up your backups you go to "backup and restore" (control panel - system and security - backup and restore) and when it asks where you want to save your backups, select the partition you've just created by highlighting its drive letter and name and then set it up to do the backup when you want it to.

I've no idea how to get the system to save restore points to anywhere other than wherever-it-is-that-the-system-puts-them, so I can't help you with that, I'm afraid.

(BTW, you're better off doing your backups on another disk drive, so that if your disk drive breaks down you can still restore your files from your backup. If your only back up is on the same drive, you have nothing to restore if you lose your hard disk.)
Feel free to assume that I won't know what you are talking about...

#3 nosmiley

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 03:58 PM

Thanks Challenged;
Your two cents worth is worth more than that to me. I followed your directions , and got the desired results. Didn't have to make any changes to your directions at all.
Maybe someone will make comments as to where the restore points are automatically going. Since you don't know either, it's probably a legitimate question.
:huh:
I always feel like some of my questions are foolish to the administrators & moderators, and others who provide the majority of the answers. Thankfully , all have been answered except one; and even it received 94 views. The best question received 3685 views, so at least the title must have been interesting. I'm not playing any little personal score card, Q&A game. Actually, I wish I didn't need Bleeping at all.
For Vista, I bought that MS book of 1375 pages with the CD, just for Vista users. I thought I'd never need Bleeping's help, with the book & dvd. I don't have enough computer knowledge to use the correct terms, apparently. The book is bound to have the answers if you know the right terms. Interestingly, with 58 pages in tiny print, the index has no entry under Repair! Going to the specific area of the problem, usually makes no mention of repair either. Billy Gates must feel that's too negative or indicative of the OS. He handles repair issues, calling them "updates." I mention all this, because they've published a new book: Windows 7 Inside out, with dvd.
Yes, I need to get another drive to keep restore info on. I'm not sure whether to go with internal HD,external HD, or SSD. This computer came with 2 GB RAM, but research & diagnostics suggest I could use more of that also.
Thanks again for your help. Send me a bill.

#4 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 05:28 PM

To see where restore points are saved, copy and paste the following into the Start Menu and hit Enter:

SystemPropertiesProtection.exe

This will show you on which drives System Restore is turned on. I don't think you can change where System Restore saves the restore points, however.

The reason Vista sent restore points to the recovery partition was because of some factory installed recovery software. It was not Vista's doings. A clean install of Vista would not do this. And Windows 7 is no different.

My recommendation would be this:

Make sure System Restore is turned on for the drive you are using (using the methods I gave above). Then go buy the biggest external hard drive you can afford and make regular backups (system image and data backups) using the "Backup and Restore" features built into Windows 7.

tekchallenged is correct about saving backups to a different drive. If the hard drive physically failed and you had your backups on it instead of an external, the backups would do you no good. That is why you should use an external. If the on-board hard drive failed, you can save yourself with the backup on the external. And if both failed for some reason, well...you are just plain unlucky then. But that is a rarity. :huh:
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#5 nosmiley

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 10:55 PM

Hello Ninja:
I used your instructions and System Restore is turned on in C. It won't let me change as you predicted. It also won't let me turn on Sys.Protection for X, the remainder. Further, it won't let me do any partitioning in C, whether I wanted to or not. I'll just be content with sending backups to X for the time being. You mentioned buying the biggest external I could afford. Are you suggesting I should get into TB's capacity? Can you suggest brands, without violating anything? I have looked at some Western Digital stuff Don't know if there are better ones. The HD in this computer is made by WD and is one of their caviar blue units. The caviar black has a 5 yr.warranty , but e-mail to WD, replied that they "don't know " what drives are used in their externals. I guess they thought they were responding to a six year. old rather than a 62 year old. I'm not partial to WD, but it has been in both off the shelf Gateways .
Thanks for the insight to what was going on with Sys Restore in Vista. It bugged me because it filled up relatively quick, and in some of the reading, it was suggsted it would take forever. I don't store a lot on computers or play games. Mainly surf. Before removing Vista hm premium from this computer I noticed the HD was about 80 % available. I did try to remove junk frequently, possibly more than recommended.
Thanks again for your help. :huh:

#6 tekchallenged

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:14 PM

I'm glad it helped.

I always feel like some of my questions are foolish to the administrators & moderators, and others who provide the majority of the answers.

And if I answer something, I think that my answer is wrong or stupid. There's no limit to "forum over-sensitivity":huh: Only sometimes will I see answers that criticize someone for not knowing already or not being able to find or figure it out themselves, but I think people who do that are unreasonable. It would be just as easy not to post such an "answer" at all. (Not necessarily on this forum, just on forums in general.) Really, the worst that can happen is that you don't get a reply. Usually someone will have something to say.

I mention all this, because they've published a new book: Windows 7 Inside out, with dvd.

I bought a book about XP by authors Cowart and Knittel., which I found useful They've also written one about Windows 7 which I'm going to buy if I can get Windows 7 working properly

I'm not sure whether to go with internal HD,external HD, or SSD.

Unless you've got other computers that you also want to back up, if you have a spare drive spot inside your computer, I'd just get another internal HD. You won't have to connect anything and you can set up your backups automatically as you'd like to do. If your motherboard or something else inside your computer breaks down you can take it out, put it into a case and turn it into an external drive. I think (but I'm not sure) that the backup is quicker to an internal hard disk than via the usb cable to an external drive. As for brands, you read people with issues and then they are against a particular brand. Unless you read something that indicates that a particular make/model has an actual issue, I think the brands are pretty much "much of a muchness". Just get one that is a good price at the time you want to buy. All brands have drives that'll fail, it's just bad luck, I reckon (just my opinion).

Thanks for reporting back. It's nice to know that a reply has been useful.
Feel free to assume that I won't know what you are talking about...

#7 keyboardNinja

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:47 PM

Are you suggesting I should get into TB's capacity?
Can you suggest brands, without violating anything?

Ehh....you'll use it up faster than you think. I have a 250GB external and I have a hard time keeping it from filling up. A 500GB would probably be suitable depending on how much you have to backup. But like I said, you will find other uses for it, as well, and it will fill up faster than you think. I wouldn't consider 1TB to be overkill (I wish I had one myself), but 2TB probably would be overkill. Another thing to consider: if you have plenty of extra space, you can allow Windows 7 Backup to keep a longer history of your backups (i.e. you can go back further in time that just the last backup, if needed).

Like tekchallenged said, most of the common brands are pretty much the same (WD, Seagate, Samsung, Hitachi, etc..). Then there are the super-duper high performance brands like Super Talent and some others I don't recall. The main thing to look for is low price and long warranty from a good quality brand (like the ones I listed).

I think (but I'm not sure) that the backup is quicker to an internal hard disk than via the usb cable to an external drive.

Yes, an IDE or SATA cable is much faster than a USB port. And it's also handy, like you said, because you don't have to remember to hook it up when the time comes around to backup (I had to program a reminder for me...ask if you want to know how I did it...it's kind of cool...lol).

So yeah, a 500GB internal hdd for a slave backup drive would probably be the best option for you. :huh:
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