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Hard Drive Performance (HELP)


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#1 Leodhas

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 05:28 PM

Hello, my current hard drive runs at 7200 rpm and I use my desktop to run Audio recording/producing software on (Ableton 8 live) for my home studio.

I am running XP service pack 2 on the system as I love xp, it is easy to use and has always worked fine for me. The PC is not online as I use it solely for running the above software.

My question is, if I replaced the existing hard drive for one that runs on 10,000 rpm or even 15,000 rpm, will I achieve better performance, a faster performance with my software?

I do not want to spend a fortune and can use a hard drive with as little as 40gb storage as long as I get the better performance off a higher rpm drive. Can anyone help or suggest a drive?



Thank You,

Louie.

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#2 computerxpds

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 09:51 PM

Hello, my current hard drive runs at 7200 rpm and I use my desktop to run Audio recording/producing software on (Ableton 8 live) for my home studio.

I am running XP service pack 2 on the system as I love xp, it is easy to use and has always worked fine for me. The PC is not online as I use it solely for running the above software.

My question is, if I replaced the existing hard drive for one that runs on 10,000 rpm or even 15,000 rpm, will I achieve better performance, a faster performance with my software?

I do not want to spend a fortune and can use a hard drive with as little as 40gb storage as long as I get the better performance off a higher rpm drive. Can anyone help or suggest a drive?



Thank You,

Louie.


You will see a little marked performance increase but with a 15,000 RPM drive you can only get about 40 GB of storage but in the 10,000 RPM (which i have in one if my macs) you can get up to 100 or so GB of space but again you wont see that much of an increase in performance.

Good luck in the hard drive search!

P.S. be aware you will have to reinstall all of your files if you replace your current hard drive and as will the operating system will need to be reinstalled.
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#3 dpunisher

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 10:30 PM

It just depends.

A 10K RPM drive will help non sequential reads, but sequential reads are on par, if not slightly slower than some of the top rated 7200 RPM drives (Caviar Blacks ect). 15K is almost the same deal, but you have to get a SAS card and the cost is prohibitive as a decent SAS controller PCI-E is going to be a few bucks.

Have you considered an SSD? http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList....amp;srchInDesc=

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#4 Baltboy

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:54 AM

You tend to get better reads and writes from a large drive (i.e. 1TB) because the aureal density is tighter plus they tend to have larger caches as well. Since you are doing audio creation the best way to get maximum performance is to upgrade your CPU and memory to the maximum supported. By keeping the files in the system memory greatly increases the speed of re-compiling files. Also if you aren't using a multi-core CPU upgrading your system to one of these will also greatly increase your performance.
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#5 Leodhas

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 02:26 PM

ok, all interesting, I have a dual core AMD ATHLON 64 X2 7750 which I've had for about 10/11 mths now. So what you're all saying is that a hard drive with a faster rpm will not improve the performance of software on my pc?

#6 computerxpds

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 02:38 PM

it will improve your performance a little but depending on you hard ware and im assuming your running sata then it wont be much if you want a big boost in performance then go with a solid state drive but those are not cheap
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#7 Platypus

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 06:04 PM

It depends on what aspect of performance you're seeking to improve. If you're trying to increase simultaneous tracks, then a faster harddrive will have an effect. If you're looking to increase VST instances, then faster CPU or more RAM is needed. If you want to reduce latency, HDD and CPU performance will both contribute.
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