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DATA GLUT


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13 replies to this topic

#1 raj29

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 07:57 AM

Way back in 1981, Bill Gates apparently said that 640 KB was more than enough for anybody. Today, you can fill up that space in less than the time it takes to blink...........

There is an interesting theory that the human race is akin to a gas - in that it expands to take up all available space. One only needs to lood around to identify at least a kernel of truth in that proposition. Much like us, data is pervasive and tends to be omnipresent. In many ways, our data is a reflection of ourselves - it's plentiful, varied, and present like a shodow sticking to our connected race. Today, a cross-section of the world wide web, that prime example of our society's data glut, is as likely to carry data from a star dead a million years ago, as it might carry your first-born's first giggle. As data explodes into our senses, data storage lags our needs, as perhaps all technology does. Why don't we have holographic storage devices yet, or better yet, those cool crystals that Superman employs to store his race's collective blog? Why are we still juggling data around across various media, partitions,and st systems? Wouldn't it be great if we could just pluck data from the sky; heedless of where it might be, or how much of it, or of what kind? Small progress has been made though;as economy of scale and production would allow - solid-state drives(SSD) are maturing quickly and have gone from noves marketing ammunition to products that us real consumers might pick up and use in our daily lives. They are a threat to the traditional hard drives of sure, and form a product category to taken seriously in the very near future. The only area SSDs lack today is storage capacity. Hard drive manufacturers are pushich storage capacities to the limits. Disk densities have gone up significantly. Today, a 2TB drive is more or less common. One terabyte is affordable, with 500 and 640 GB drives becoming a bare minimum for any PC, even if you think you don't need it. And you do.

Then what should be our next storage solution for future?
I am the Saint and the Soldier that walks in Peace. I am the Humble dust of your feet, But don't think my Spirituality makes me weak. The Heavens will roar if my Sword were to speak...

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#2 BlackSpyder

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 04:37 PM

In '81 Bill could not have foreseen what we're using computers for today. We're using them to power Hi-def entertainment systems which the specs for them in '81 were far beyond the capabilities of even a super computer. We're breaking down the human genome. In in the 1980's the average program operated on less than 1MB there was no need for alot of the code that exists in their descendants today Lotus didn't need color formating options, there weren't color printers and color monitors were few and far between, there was no need for sound cues as most PC's didn't have speakers or sound cards, and so on.

SSD's will not be the wave of the future. They are merely a stepping stone for whats to come. We've stepped down in size from a 5.5" Hard drive to a 3.5" HDD(desktop), to a 2.5"(Laptop, max capacity is 1 TB currently), to a 1" (iPod Classic, max capacity is currently 160GB). i look for cloud computing to be the next thing but first Broadband for all must occur.

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#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 02:55 AM

actually I find I can actually get by on a 80 gb hard drive no issues. course that being said I am running 500 gig hard drive. . .but theres some truth to that people take up room, and greed is a big factor we have to just keep having more and more and more. . .people are never content with what they have.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#4 Layback Bear

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 09:51 PM

Bill Gates did look into the future once. When he lift IBM and said PC'S would be the future and IBM thought he was crazy. Bill was crazy smart.

#5 the_patriot11

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:41 AM

and yet IBM is still making a fortune without making PCs. . .

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#6 Nawtheasta

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 10:28 PM

Data Glut an interesting concept. . I wonder how physically big a memory storage device would need to be to store every typed word, picture, note of music and all other data every recorded in the history of man. How much actual physical space. 1 cubic mile? an auditorium? As the technology advances the amount of space would get smaller as the data amount grew larger. Would you ever be able to have the equivalent of all ( 100%) human history stored in something as small as a PC??
Boggles the mind
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Nawtheasta

#7 Layback Bear

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 03:05 PM

Remember the old Commodore 64. Computers have come a long way and still a long way to go.

#8 duckne55

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 07:00 AM

the future of media storage is closer than you think.
i couldn't find the original article i read, and that is slightly different from this, but this should keep you busy :thumbsup:
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/39146

#9 carri

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 02:34 PM

An interesting topic, thanks raj29. The article linked by Duckne55 about the possibility of storing and reading data using laser light and nanorods just is amazing (Thanks Duckne55)! The implications of a 5 D recording process are enormous. In theory they are looking at the typical storage of over 7TB on a DVD sized disc. Now my mind is doing more than boggling trying to grasp the fact that this technology could be just around the corner and not light years away!
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#10 Stang777

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 06:08 PM

The hard drive I have shows as 37.2 gigs and after two years of using it, I still have 21 gigs free. Obviously I have no need for a larger drive.

#11 raj29

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 05:08 AM

On the contrary I have two 320GB HDD & the new one which I have bought 8 months ago is going to reach its limit. :thumbsup:
I am the Saint and the Soldier that walks in Peace. I am the Humble dust of your feet, But don't think my Spirituality makes me weak. The Heavens will roar if my Sword were to speak...

#12 Capn Easy

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 01:30 AM

Yes, I remember the old Commodore 64... It was wonderful after I outgrew my Vic-20!


Really, I remember 8 inch floppy drives and 5 MB hard drives.

A lot of our need for upgrades comes from cheaper and cheaper capacity and inefficiency. A Word document takes up a whole lot more room than the equivalent ASCII file, and most documents really don't need the overhead. IMHO, of course. All us Neandertals think so! :thumbsup:

#13 liamari

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 01:35 PM

I don't miss my daisy wheel printer! Though it was kinda cool to watch.

8IN floppies are part of what got me into trouble when I got my first real PC... they kept insisting that I insert the floppy disk, when all I had where hard plastic ones... GIGGLE

Space/Time:

Now that I am rid of a superfluous copy of Windows, I have plenty of space on my tinsy tiny 40g HD... But I am under the impression that more space, means less time... or so it seems.

I believe, if we concentrate, we can pull all information from everywhere in without the use of man made tools... I'm working on it.

Peace,
Lia
~A candle loses none of it's light by lighting another candle.~

#14 Baltboy

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 10:27 PM

My first hard drive was a massive 100 MB in a 5 1/4" width and about three of todays drives tall. It was also about as fast as a floppy :wacko:

I think the electromechanical solutions of today will inevitablably have to go into the biomechanical to achieve the storage capacity and speed needed inthe future. A crude brain, if you will, would be infinitely faster than todays drives with a much higher "density" if that kind of verbage would even apply at that level.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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