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Memory - what is using 5 GB?


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#1 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 11:21 PM

I have a 6.0 GB (tiny, I know) hard drive, but only have MS Office, IE, Adobe Reader, basic Canon needs. No photos (keep them on a thumb drive), no music, no games. The memory keeps shrinking. It's down to 15% free space (953 MB) - not enough to defrag. How do I find out what's taking up the space? And how to get rid of it? Thank you

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#2 Guest_joelj1964_*

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 11:27 PM

Thanks for posting your question. Is this your primary or secondary drive? If it is your primary drive then the reduction could be related to system restore points.

#3 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 12:22 AM

My primary and only drive (except for the thumb that hold pixs and backup Word/Excel files). The system restore is set to max (12%). Where do I find these system restore points and what do you suggest I do about them? I would like to clean up this machine - it does most of what I need and will perhaps consider a new one when Win7's kinks are worked out. Your guidance is much appreciated.

#4 Budapest

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 12:48 AM

This is a good free utility for finding out what is taking up the space on your drive:

http://w3.win.tue.nl/nl/onderzoek/onderzoe...on/sequoiaview/
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw

#5 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 01:46 AM

SequoiaView looks very interesting. My computer tells me it doesn't have appropriate digital signatures etc, but I am trusting you that it is safe. Question: can you help me interpret the results? That is, what do I do after I get the picture? Thank you.

#6 Budapest

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 01:50 AM

I've installed it on a few different computers with no problem.

Once you get the picture up you just move your mouse pointer over it and it will tell you what the file is. It groups the files by the folder they are in.

It's a very handy tool I think.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw

#7 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 01:57 AM

OK. It tells me to shut everything down while it does its thing. Once I find the fat files, I'll be back to find out what to do with them, unless the answer is already on a forum.

#8 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 03:31 AM

Dear Budapest,
SequoiaView: WOW
Thank you for providing this link. I will ask questions about the results in a separate thread. It is an amazing tool.

#9 cryptodan

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 08:47 AM

Updates to windows xp can increase c:\windows directory quite abit especially as it keeps uninstallers for updates present.

#10 Stang777

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:27 PM

System Restore can also take up a lot of space. Many of the things that people delete from their system to free up space does not free up space because it ends up in a restore point in the System Volume Information folder.

#11 cryptodan

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:34 PM

System Restore can also take up a lot of space. Many of the things that people delete from their system to free up space does not free up space because it ends up in a restore point in the System Volume Information folder.


And this is why I disable restore on all my computers. I dont care about reformatting.

#12 Stang777

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:43 PM

I would rather have the protection that System Restore provides. Even though I have a rather small hard drive, there is plenty of space on it so I do not see what harm it does for System Restore to use some of it.

#13 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 01:34 AM

Thank you for all of these comments. Yes, updates and their uninstallers take up a lot of memory. I understand the updates are critical for security issues. Is this true? About the uninstallers which hog memory: Is it safe to delete the uninstallers? Does one uninstall them or just delete?
One huge chunk of the drive is taken up by Adobe. Scattered throughout are sizeable chunks of Reader 7, Acrobat pieces and a variety of other Adobe stuff. How can I get rid of them? Uninstall didn't do it. Can I uninstall the current Reader, manually delete all the remaining Adobe file folders, then reinstall the new 9.3? It looks to me that Adobe is taking over the hard drive. :thumbsup:

#14 cryptodan

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 01:38 AM

Thank you for all of these comments. Yes, updates and their uninstallers take up a lot of memory. I understand the updates are critical for security issues. Is this true? About the uninstallers which hog memory: Is it safe to delete the uninstallers? Does one uninstall them or just delete?
One huge chunk of the drive is taken up by Adobe. Scattered throughout are sizeable chunks of Reader 7, Acrobat pieces and a variety of other Adobe stuff. How can I get rid of them? Uninstall didn't do it. Can I uninstall the current Reader, manually delete all the remaining Adobe file folders, then reinstall the new 9.3? It looks to me that Adobe is taking over the hard drive. :thumbsup:



Do not delete the installers. I did so by mistake and was unable to perform any windows updates. I had to reformat.

#15 SeekingSolutions

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 01:58 AM

What about UN-installers?




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