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my first build (help pls)


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#1 alex of the west

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 05:10 AM

I have had 2 laptops die on me recently, and ive decided i will never be dealing with one ever again. im now using my old but incredibly reliable old hp with an amd in it.

its time for a new computer and i want to go the custom route.
All i really need is the tower and an o.s. and im strongly leaning towards windows 7. my price range ceiling is 1k, but id like to keep it under that as much as possible. i'm looking for a very solid $700-950 system (including windows) having tried all the procesors, i will be going with an amd cpu. I will be using this for gaming (and i want it to excel at this) and standard computer use. I DONT plan on doing that bizzarre double monitor thing that people seem to like. i dont need a massive hardrive because i tend to format them regularly. i probably woudlnt need anytihng beyond a regular cd burner.

here is what I have come up with so far, but please give tips and point things out that might be better. plus, as this is my first time building a computer, im not certain all the things i went with are compatible. one thing i am especialy unsure about is what kind of power supply i need.i dont really know what video card to go with. i am told the 5770 is a great card, but a lot of people are mentioning lag and glitches with it.
here is what i have come up with thus far:

(ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO AM3 AMD 785G HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131398
(AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16819103727
(OCZ ModXStream Pro OCZ700MXSP 700W ATX12V V2.2 / EPS12V) +(SAPPHIRE 100283L Radeon HD 5770)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboD...t=Combo.329720
(G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Dual Channel )
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231193
(Western Digital Caviar Black WD5001AALS 500GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136320
(Antec Nine Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811129021
(SAMSUNG Black 22X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 22X DVD-R 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-ROM)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16827151188
(Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit )
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16832116754

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#2 Wildabeast

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 06:49 AM

Looks like a good build to me, but I'm not sure about the video card. There are a couple of guys on here who know a lot about them, I'm sure they'll show up soon and either tell you the good and bad or recommend a better one for you. :thumbsup:

P.S.
Your links did not work for me, maybe it was me, but I went to newegg and looked up the parts..
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#3 hamluis

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 10:55 AM

I think that the links don't work because they are behind the secure firewall.

My experience is that I use the open part of Newegg, track the item to the display/specs/price page...and then link to that.

Louis

#4 dpunisher

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 01:21 PM

That OCZ700MXSP is just not a very good PSU. JonnyGuru, HardOCP, and Hardwaresecrets have the best PSU reviews. Spend a few extra bucks and get a good PSU now, it will save future headaches. A 700 watt PSU is overkill for the system you spec'ed out. Seasonic and Corsair= happy PSUs. There are plenty of other good ones out there, but you have to do your research. There are diamonds among the turds if you dig enough.

Try the 640 gig WD black instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16822136319 Better platter density and it is faster.

Nothing wrong with a 5770. It is almost as fast as a 4870 and handles light gaming, good multimedia features as well.

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#5 alex of the west

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 02:21 PM

thanks, i went with the hd you suggested.

what psu would you recomend in my price range? you say 700 watts is overkill, but how much should i aim for?

people were saying they coudlnt see the links, here is what i am looking at

http://img688.imageshack.us/img688/7383/20885293.png

Edited by alex of the west, 17 February 2010 - 02:29 PM.


#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 02:34 PM

nothin wrong with a 700 watt PSU though it is a little more then you need, I like to have breathing room for future expandability. Im running a 750 watt myself. I do have a slightly power hungry video card though. this PSU is one that I would recomend http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817171052 also, that video card is a good video card Saphire is a trusted manufacturer I use their cards in all my builds.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#7 alex of the west

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 02:43 AM

thanks for all the advice everyone!

also, i am considering getting a good cooler for the cpu. what is a good but reasonable one?

Edited by alex of the west, 18 February 2010 - 02:43 AM.


#8 RainbowSix

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:24 PM

Using an aftermarket cooler with an AMD CPU voids your warranty.

This Limited Warranty shall be null and void if the AMD microprocessor which is the subject of this Limited Warranty is used with any heatsink/fan other than the one provided herewith.


[ Antec 1200 v3 | Gigabyte GA-890FXA-UD5 rev. 3.1 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T (overclocked to 4GHz) | Corsair XMS3 4x4GB DDR3 1600 | COOLER MASTER Silent Pro 600W & Visiontek Juice Box 450W | SAMSUNG 470 Series 64GB SSD | WD Caviar Black 640GB & Samsung Spinpoint 2TB HDD | 2x XFX Radeon HD 5770 in Crossfire | SAMSUNG 22X DVD±RW | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit]

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#9 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 05:43 PM

And yet...everyone does it. In all seriousness, you should check to make sure your processor runs properly before installing any aftermarket cooler. If the CPU works and doesn't cause any errors, then you should be alright. Chances of your CPU failing are very, very small, less than 1%.

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#10 alex of the west

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:01 PM

really?! no warranty if you use another cooler eh? well thanks a bunch for the tip! :thumbsup: (noo cooler for me then)

p.s. do you think that includes getting arctic 5 paste or... should i just go with stock as it comes?

Edited by alex of the west, 19 February 2010 - 08:04 PM.


#11 RainbowSix

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:10 PM

I don't think using different thermal paste will void your warranty, but aftermarket thermal paste is really unnecessary if you plan to use the stock heatsink-fan. There's no reason to use anything else unless you're an overclocker.
I should point out though, that it's necessary to re-apply thermal paste every time you lift the heatsink.

Edited by RainbowSix, 19 February 2010 - 08:15 PM.

[ Antec 1200 v3 | Gigabyte GA-890FXA-UD5 rev. 3.1 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T (overclocked to 4GHz) | Corsair XMS3 4x4GB DDR3 1600 | COOLER MASTER Silent Pro 600W & Visiontek Juice Box 450W | SAMSUNG 470 Series 64GB SSD | WD Caviar Black 640GB & Samsung Spinpoint 2TB HDD | 2x XFX Radeon HD 5770 in Crossfire | SAMSUNG 22X DVD±RW | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit]

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#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:21 PM

eh I never use the stock paste, ever. I use the stock coolers, unless you overclock, if you design your case right with proper air flow you should never need more then stock, but Ive found they often use crappy thermal paste and usually to much of it on the stock heatsinks. I always clean it off and put on my own arctic silver.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#13 alex of the west

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 09:57 PM

well now im on the fence about this. because i was thinking about overclocking. so what im getting out of this is the following:

dont use a cooler if you want the warranty

use a cooler if you want to overclock

therefore, if you overclock, you wont have a warranty. this is unless you want to overheat it using stock and melt it, right?

i guess that leads me to the following question--- overclocking, worth it or not, does it give you a noticeable boost in games?

#14 RainbowSix

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 03:35 AM

dont use a cooler if you want the warranty
use a cooler if you want to overclock

Assuming you mean a cooler other than the included one, you would be correct. You definitely need a CPU cooler, but you don't necessarily need a large, powerful one.

does it give you a noticeable boost in games?

That depends on how much you overclock.

You'll probably be just fine with mild overlocking if you remove the pre-applied thermal grease and apply some better stuff. Many would say Arctic Silver 5 is the best, but I am partial to OCZ Freeze. I use it and my CPU temp with the stock heatsink-fan has never gone above 53C under prime95 stress testing. My processor (Athlon II) has a maximum safe temperature of 71C. That leaves an 18 degree cushion in case I ever want to overclock.

Just make sure you remove >99% of the old thermal grease, and that you don't scratch the heatsink when you remove it.

Edited by RainbowSix, 20 February 2010 - 03:46 AM.

[ Antec 1200 v3 | Gigabyte GA-890FXA-UD5 rev. 3.1 | AMD Phenom II x6 1090T (overclocked to 4GHz) | Corsair XMS3 4x4GB DDR3 1600 | COOLER MASTER Silent Pro 600W & Visiontek Juice Box 450W | SAMSUNG 470 Series 64GB SSD | WD Caviar Black 640GB & Samsung Spinpoint 2TB HDD | 2x XFX Radeon HD 5770 in Crossfire | SAMSUNG 22X DVD±RW | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64-bit]

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#15 DJBPace07

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 10:47 PM

Don't worry about the warranty thing. Under normal operating conditions, an AMD CPU failure rate is, on average, about 0.9%. If the CPU is working out of the box, you will be fine, most likely. However, the caveat to this is some coolers are very heavy and can, if enough force is applied during installation or if the tower is dropped while moving, damage the CPU and motherboard. Also, if you don't know what you're doing with the overclocking process, you can damage the CPU, which will also void the warranty. AMD's warranty period is for three years on its boxed CPU's. By the time your warranty runs out, you may be wanting to upgrade or experiment with overclocking which is reasonable since the warranty period is over by then anyway. Some aftermarket CPU coolers already have the thermal compound applied and sometimes, it is pretty good. You cannot really melt the CPU since the CPU will throttle back and eventually shut off if the temperatures become too high. I've never had a reason to overclock my CPU's. Whenever I get a new computer, I always buy the best CPU I can afford. By the time I need to purchase a new one, the CPU is usually still able to run almost all the software that is currently out.

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