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Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Paid Version


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#1 Jagst3r15

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 11:32 AM

Is it worth it? I have the free version, but would love that real-time protection. Is it better than Windows Defender for Windows 7??

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 02:29 PM

I recommend taking advantage of the Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Protection Module which uses advanced heuristic scanning technology to monitor your system and provide real-time protection to prevent the installation of most new malware. This technology monitors every process and stops malicious processes before they can infect your computer. Enabling the Protection Module feature requires reqistration and purchase of a license key that includes free lifetime upgrades and support. After activation, Malwarebytes can be set to update itself and schedule scans automatically on a daily basis. The Protection Module is not intrusive as it utilizes few system resources and should not conflict with other scanners or anti-virus programs.
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#3 Jagst3r15

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 03:06 PM

Thanks quietman, you always have excellent advice! (hence my signature).

EDIT: This makes me sound like a newb, but what is the difference between getting a malware infection versus a virus? It seems that paying 25 dollars for the Malware protection is quite steep. I guess what I am trying to say is what is the biggest threat, malware or a virus?

Edited by Jagst3r15, 15 February 2010 - 03:17 PM.

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#4 quietman7

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 03:54 PM

You're welcome Jagst3r15

Malware and Spyware are general terms that refer to unsolicited commercial software (Rogue security programs) which downloads itself onto your system and often performs certain behaviors and hidden activities such as advertising, collecting personal information, or changing the configuration of your computer without your knowledge of permission. Some will force pop-up adds, redirect your browser's home page or search page, or add additional components to your browser you don't need or want. Some will track your Web movements, collect demographic and usage information from your computer and report back to their creators with the data. Others will offer free enhancements to your operating system or browser such as extra toolbars, special buttons, enhanced search capabilities and make it very difficult to change your settings back to the way you originally had them.

A Virus is a man-made program (small bits of programming code disguised as something else or buried in other codes) that causes an unexpected and usually undesirable event. A virus can replicate itself and is designed to automatically spread to other computer users. Viruses can be transmitted as attachments to e-mail, as downloads, or be present on a diskette or CD. Some viruses wreak their effect as soon as their code is executed while other viruses lie dormant until circumstances cause their code to be executed by the computer.

A Trojans horse is a destructive stand-alone application that masquerades as a benign program and hides "malicious code" within the original source code in such a way that it can gain control and do its chosen form of damage. This malicious code is a process or function specifically added by the Trojan's programmer that performs an activity the user is unaware of. Trojans are executable programs (.exe, .vbs, .com, .bat, etc) which means that when you open the file, they will perform some action.

A Worm is a a self-supporting program (parasite) considered to be part of the viral camp because they replicate and spread from computer to computer. As with viruses, a worm's malicious act is often the very act of replication; they can overwhelm computer infrastructures by generating massive numbers of e-mails or requests for connections that servers can't handle. Worms differ from viruses in that they are not just bits of code that exist in other files. They can be whole files. In addition, they replicate without the need for another program to be run. Worms can replicate over a permanent or dial-up network and usually perform a malicious actions, such as using up the computer's resources and shutting the system down. Worms reside in active memory and do NOT alter files or attach to other programs. A typical worm will only maintain a functional copy of itself in active memory or it may write itself to disk. Worms use parts of an operating system that are automatic and usually invisible to the user. It is common for worms to be noticed only when their uncontrolled replication consumes system resources, slowing or halting other tasks.

Rootkits are powerful system-monitoring programs that are almost impossible to detect using current security products. Rootkits are not an infection or a trojan in and of themselves. They are used by Trojans, Botnets, and IRCBots to conceal their presence. Thus a rootkit's purpose is to hide itself from view in order to prevent detection of an attacker's software and make removal more difficult. Rootkits are especially dangerous because they compromise system integrity by making changes that allow it to be used by the attacker for malicious purposes. Rootkits are used be Trojans to conceal its presence (hide from view) in order to prevent detection of an attacker's software and make removal more difficult. Many rootkits can hook into the Windows 32-bit kernel, and patch several APIs to hide new registry keys and files they install. They can disable your anti-virus and security tools to prevent detection and removal. Remote attackers use backdoors as a means of accessing and taking control of a computer that bepasses security mechanisms. This type of exploit allows them to steal sensitive information like passwords, personal and financial data which is send back to the hacker.

In recent years the term Malware has become all encompassing by many security experts to include any of the above.
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