Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

2 Broadbands at home. Want to access files on one broadband LAN from the other


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 TheyCallMeMrGlass

TheyCallMeMrGlass

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Local time:11:23 PM

Posted 13 February 2010 - 05:14 PM

Hi Network experts and enthusiasts. Can any of you provide a suggested solution for the following?

Basically, I have 2 broadbands each with their own router and LAN. From here on, I'll refer to them as BB1 and BB2. BB1 is basically my own business broadband. BB2 is my personal broadband. While I am on BB2, I often want to access files on my BB1 PC and vica versa. But the only way I am able to do this is to use a USB memory stick and transfer files. But thats such a primitive way! I want to somehow connect the 2 LANs so that I can access files across LANs. But i want internet access on BB1 to remain routed through BB1 router and BB2 internet access remain routed through BB2 router.

So how can I achieve this? I'm suspecting an answer may involve having 2 network cards on at least 1 PC in each LAN? If so, how do I configure to avoid both LANs using the same internet channel/router?

A solution to this puzzle will be most welcome

Edited by TheyCallMeMrGlass, 14 February 2010 - 04:39 AM.

"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Orecomm

Orecomm

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseburg, Oregon
  • Local time:03:23 PM

Posted 14 February 2010 - 06:19 PM

Greetings,

There are a couple ways to do this, some more elegant than others, and a little more info would help narrow down the options. First of all, can you identify the routers you are using on each of your LANs? Secondly, how comfortable are you with getting "down and dirty" with router or PC configs (command line level)? Third, what are the reasons for maintaining two separate LANs and accesses? (Not that I am questioning the need, I also have dual access for home and business here, but just to make sure the solution maintains the critical distinctions.)

#3 TheyCallMeMrGlass

TheyCallMeMrGlass
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Local time:11:23 PM

Posted 14 February 2010 - 08:00 PM

Greetings to you too, Orecomm, thanks for your response!

In answer to your questions:

1. BB1 router is a Thompson ST585 v6. BB2 is a ST585 v7. Both provided by the Service Provider. I can log into both routers through the HTML interface.

2. I have worked with routers before on a basic level. Ie, opening ports, setting up DHCP scope, etc. But I have only configured via their HTML interface, not at a command level I'm afraid. But I can catch on quick ;) I can use MS DOS command prompts. Getting down and dirty is a fun prospect for me as I build my own pcs. Just networking is not quite my strong point but I hope to rectify that shortcoming in due course!

3. I understand why you ask for the purpose of my setup for determining what kind of security I need, right? No probs. BB1 primarily has one PC that is used to dump data to and fro a couple of other work offices by which I use PC Anywhere. I also use Logmein on it. Only I have access to it, no one else does but I do plan to have a couple of my clients having access to it, to share some large video work files together but thats further down the line. The speed of the broadband is not very high 2mbs but sufficient for the business needs and easy to seperate as an expense in my book keeping (another reason for keeping it seperate). BB2 is on a higher broadband speed for all my personal enjoyment!

I live in London btw so my response may come half a day later as I suspect most people here are US citizens including yourself? Its half midnight as I write this and will be turning in but I look forward to your follow up post!
"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#4 Orecomm

Orecomm

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseburg, Oregon
  • Local time:03:23 PM

Posted 15 February 2010 - 05:18 PM

Great ! It looks like we can do this the easy way.

Here is what is going to happen. We will combine your two "inside" networks into one physical network with each gateway providing a way out. Then we will set your business computer to a Static IP and it's gateway to the business router. Your personal router will manage all DHCP (and probably all wireless activity) for any other computers that may live or visit your place, providing the IP of the personal gateway. Anything should be able to access anything locally (depending on normal OS security), but the business machine will use the business gateway exclusively for any communication outside the local LAN, and everything else will use the Personal gateway. Does this sound like what you have in mind ?

If so, proceed, if not, let me know.

You may want to read through this before starting, just so you know what you are getting yourself into.

Virtually all of the changes will be on your business router and PC, and since I don't happen to have a ST585 handy I'm flying a little blind. If things don't seem to be going according to plan STOP and let me know.

First of all, we need to make your business router just a little bit less intelligent. Log in to the router and back up or write down the current settings on each page you can get to. We aren't going to touch the service provider (WAN) side, but it is the most critical, so don't miss it.

Now we will turn off the wireless portion of the router, if it hasn't been already. This should be under Home Network -> Device Settings or Home Network -> Interfaces and we want to just disable the wireless.

Next we want to disable DHCP. This should be under Interfaces -> LocalNetwork and once again we just want to disable it completely.

Now we need to change the addresses that your router is using on the inside (LocalNetwork) so that they don't conflict with your other router. By default, it seems there are two active addresses, 192.168.1.254 and 10.0.0.138, both with a /24 mask (which is the same as 255.255.255.0 in dotted decimal notation). It looks like the default DHCP setup assigns addresses from 192.168.1.64 to 192.168.1.253, so we want to avoid that range. Even though we have turned DHCP off on this router once the two are connected together the other router will be assigning addresses. The addresses we will change your business router to are 192.168.1.1/24 and 10.0.0.137/24 so we don't conflict. When this change is made you will lose communication with the router, because it's address will have changed, so lets take a short detour to your work machine and set it up before we change addresses. That way you can log back into the router after the change from that machine.

On your work machine get into Control Panel -> Network Connections, select your Local Area Connection and then Properties, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and then Properties again (phew). Now select Use the following IP address and set IP Address 192.168.1.2 , Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0, and Default Gateway 192.168.1.1 . Select Use the following DNS Server Addresses and enter 192.168.1.1 for the Preferred DNS Server. Hit OK and close things out back to your desktop.

Now get back into your router and go to Home Network -> Interface Settings -> Configure and you should see the current IP address on the left. Change 192.168.1.254 to 192.168.1.1, and 10.0.0.138 (if present) to 10.0.0.137. The subnet mask for each should be 255.255.255.0. Save.

The router will probably reboot at this stage. Once it finishes try to log on to it using your work computer. The router's new address should be 192.168.1.1. Check and see if you have good Internet connectivity. Good ? OK ! We are almost done.

Now we glue the networks together. This will take an Ethernet cable from the back of one router to the back of the other. It looks like the ports on that router are auto-MDX so any decent Ethernet cable should work, but if the lights don't come on you may need a crossover cable. A crossover has pins 1 and 2 on one end swapped to 3 and 6 on the other, and vice-versa. The local 'puter shop should have one, or anyone that deals with Ethernet a bit either has one or can whip one up for you. The cable should be from any of the LAN ports on one router to any of the LAN ports on the other. Only one cable please. Connecting two will introduce you a nice broadcast storm and the reason the Spanning Tree protocol exists, but unfortunately is usually disabled on SOHO routers and switches.

You will need to edit any port mappings on your business router to point to the new business computer IP address.

You should now have full connectivity between your local devices, with separation of access. You might want to make the Windows Workgroup name the same on all your machines just to make it easy. You can use any open Ethernet ports on either router for additions to your home network, and any wireless devices will also join the home network. Only if you add a static IP addressed device (in the range of 192.168.1.3 to 192.168.1.63) with the Default Gateway field set to 192.168.1.1 will it use the Business broadband access.

Let me know how it works (or not...)

And yes, I'm across the puddle. Oregon, actually. Almost got my feet in the Other puddle.

#5 TheyCallMeMrGlass

TheyCallMeMrGlass
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Local time:11:23 PM

Posted 16 February 2010 - 07:39 AM

@Orecomm, that sounds absolutely perfect for me! Thank you for laying it out in a clearcut manner. You obviously had to research the menu layout of my routers, I appreciate that too ;) I understand everything, and it makes very good sense. So just to confirm I understood, all devices are within the 192.168.1.x LAN with /24 mask but my business router and computer will be assigned static IP addresses outside the DHCP scope of my personal broadband router. And of course cant have 2 devices providing dhcp so I need to turn that off on my business router along with the wireless (dont quite understand why switching the wireless off is important but I'll do it anyway!). Set the gateway+DNS of my business computer to that of the business router. Then connect my business router to my personal one with a cross over cable. Hence my business computer communicates with the outside through my business router and my other computers are DHCP assigned so continue to communicate with the outside through my personal router but this time ALL of my computers can talk to each other on the same LAN. Perfect and very neat, and not only that, I can see this solution will also allow all my computers to share the same resources (2 network printers/scanner) too. Sorry to repeat what you said in my own rudimentary way but just wanted to be sure I got the whole logic of it all!

Do allow me a couple days to implement your solution before I report back on its success! I'll need to buy the cross over cable first, which I'll try and get today.

And thank you!

Edited by TheyCallMeMrGlass, 16 February 2010 - 07:48 AM.

"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#6 Orecomm

Orecomm

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseburg, Oregon
  • Local time:03:23 PM

Posted 16 February 2010 - 11:08 AM

You seem to have the idea.

Turning off the second wireless was just to simplify things, it shouldn't break anything to leave it on, but since that router isn't providing DHCP, and nothing connected to that wireless will be using that gateway unless statically assigned, the radio is just redundant noise. Less RF is better. It also provides a little protection from the case where something is wired to one router and wirelessly connects to the other, which could create a bridge loop and really bog down your network. Simple is better.

A crossover cable may not be needed if your routers support Auto-MDX (auto-crossover). It would work with a straight through Ethernet. You can try it and see if the lights come on. If not, it's off to see the cable wizard.

#7 TheyCallMeMrGlass

TheyCallMeMrGlass
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 42 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Local time:11:23 PM

Posted 17 February 2010 - 06:07 AM

@ORECOMM

I am extremely pleased to say that I have successfully implemented your solution without any hickups. As you suspected, a normal ethernet cable was suffice to connect the 2 routers. I didnt know about auto-MDX ports, my routers seem so basic I wouldnt have thought they would have such a useful feature.

Thank you, sir.
"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users