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Question about Routers


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#1 SmokeViper07

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 06:42 PM

I have a home network set up consisting of: Desktop A running windows xp connected directly into the modem(wired), Desktop B running Windows XP connected to a Linksys WRT54G Wireless Router through a 50ft cat5 cable, Laptop A running Windows Vista and Laptop/Netbook B running Windows XP connected Wirelessly, and lastly a PlayStation 3 connected wirelessly. At the current time I am having issues with internet connections dropping intermittently at random times on Desktop B and the wireless connections. This has usually been a quick solve by running out and resetting the router. I personally use Desktop B and am looking to upgrade to windows 7 ultimate I have and having the modem and router moved to my room for easier maintenance and a better connection for myself. I require a strong connection for online gaming and lots of downloading daily. I have started to come to the conclusion that my issue is probably with my router, if any of you think its a different issue please let me know. Now I come to the main question which is, what would you all recommend for me to buy as a wireless router that will support my large amounts of downloading and keep steady for online gaming for both desktop B and the PS3? Please let me add I am on a budget, I can't spare to spend 150-200 bucks on a router. Thanks in advance.

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#2 xblindx

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 06:53 PM

Try resetting your router first, you can do so by putting a small object like a paperclip in the reset hole on the back of your router, this will reset all of its settings, including security.

#3 SmokeViper07

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 07:08 PM

That is actually what I have been doing lately, just I am looking to remove having to reset the router every few hours when it decides to go out.

#4 Raker

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 07:46 PM

Do you happen to have an "event logging" feature enabled on that linksys router? If so you may want to disable it for the time being.
I worked at on a job where the home owner was using a linksys N router and had a "logging" feature enabled. The network would become unreliable and require a reset then it would work for a couple of days and repeat same symptoms. When he disabled it the problem went away.

Have you tried checking for a firmware update. I know it can be risky (could turn it into a paper weight) but maybe a solution.

#5 SmokeViper07

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 08:01 PM

I will check for the "event logging" feature you mentioned and reply back with the result.

As far as the firmware update, you are talking about updating my BIOS correct? No I haven't done this but I also don't think it is the issue as other computers on my network are effected by this as well, the only one which stays connected is Desktop A, which is connected directly into the modem.

#6 Raker

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 08:17 PM

No I was talking about the firmware on the router. I have had to update the firmware on a d-link router for similar glitches. I just "Googled" this problem. Check this article out see if this helps. Firmware update
:thumbsup: Beware updating firmware there is always a risk that something could go terribly wrong, like maybe the router will not work anymore.
Good Luck!

#7 xblindx

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 08:19 PM

No I was talking about the firmware on the router. I have had to update the firmware on a d-link router for similar glitches.


Oh god, don't get me started on D-Link lol, I had to flash it to a LOWER firmware for a DIFFERENT model to get my router from constantly disconnecting, it works perfectly now though :thumbsup:

#8 Raker

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:13 PM

No I was talking about the firmware on the router. I have had to update the firmware on a d-link router for similar glitches.


Oh god, don't get me started on D-Link lol, I had to flash it to a LOWER firmware for a DIFFERENT model to get my router from constantly disconnecting, it works perfectly now though :thumbsup:


A different model?!? That's crazy! I don't even know how/why you would use a different model firmware even lower. That is pretty cool that you got it working with that firmware version. Posted Image

#9 CaveDweller2

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:33 PM

You have a PC directly plugged into the modem and then talk of a router. What is the router plugged into? What is the make and model of the modem?

I'm a little confused as to how you are getting online.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#10 Orecomm

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:39 PM

Greetings,

Most of the newer generation 802.11n routers will have better propagation than the g series, but to get full advantage you need a 802.11n interface at each end. There is some advantage without, but not a lot. Your best first shot is to take a look around and see what other devices might be interfering with your signal. An easy way to check out the local WiFi neighborhood is with NetStumbler (NetStumbler.com or many other download sites). Download and install on your laptop/netbook and do a little walkabout with it running. Note what channels the signals you pick up are running on, particularly the strongest. Set your router to use the channel with the lowest level signal on either channel 1, 6, or 11 (don't use other channels, they will just cause you and others problems). Use Channel 1 if there are no strong signals on 1-3, use 6 if there are no strong signals on 4-8, and use 11 if there are no strong signals on 9-11 (these are US channels - overseas you may have more or less options, up to channel 14). Also look at when your signal loss happens - when the phone rings ? (2.4Ghz phones) Cooking dinner (Microwave, usually on higher channels), evenings ? (Baby monitor or TV remote controls). You can't see these signals without an analyzer (Ubiquity has a 2.4Ghz AirView one for $40, but probably not worth it for a one-time deal it unless you want to impress your friends).

Depending on the version of your WRT54g you may also be able to load one of the Linux firmwares on it, such as DD-WRT, which tend to be pretty stable and will let you turn up the gain a little (don't max it though, the signal quality drops off badly as you approach max). This only if you are feeling a little adventurous or have a spare router lying about, because it is possible to turn your router into a doorstop installing these if things don't go right.

Hope this helps...

#11 SmokeViper07

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 01:09 AM

Greetings,

Most of the newer generation 802.11n routers will have better propagation than the g series, but to get full advantage you need a 802.11n interface at each end. There is some advantage without, but not a lot. Your best first shot is to take a look around and see what other devices might be interfering with your signal. An easy way to check out the local WiFi neighborhood is with NetStumbler (NetStumbler.com or many other download sites). Download and install on your laptop/netbook and do a little walkabout with it running. Note what channels the signals you pick up are running on, particularly the strongest. Set your router to use the channel with the lowest level signal on either channel 1, 6, or 11 (don't use other channels, they will just cause you and others problems). Use Channel 1 if there are no strong signals on 1-3, use 6 if there are no strong signals on 4-8, and use 11 if there are no strong signals on 9-11 (these are US channels - overseas you may have more or less options, up to channel 14). Also look at when your signal loss happens - when the phone rings ? (2.4Ghz phones) Cooking dinner (Microwave, usually on higher channels), evenings ? (Baby monitor or TV remote controls). You can't see these signals without an analyzer (Ubiquity has a 2.4Ghz AirView one for $40, but probably not worth it for a one-time deal it unless you want to impress your friends).

Depending on the version of your WRT54g you may also be able to load one of the Linux firmwares on it, such as DD-WRT, which tend to be pretty stable and will let you turn up the gain a little (don't max it though, the signal quality drops off badly as you approach max). This only if you are feeling a little adventurous or have a spare router lying about, because it is possible to turn your router into a doorstop installing these if things don't go right.

Hope this helps...


Thanks that helped alot I will look into these you pointed out. Also you pointed out using linux firmwares, would something like Tomato work for this?

#12 SmokeViper07

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 07:39 PM

I just finished playing around with my settings and I just got bumped off again, liking Win7 with its diagnostic tool to fix connection errors I didn't have to get up and reset the router this time. I started browsing the web a bit with firefox 3.6 (newest version) and got stuck with page loading errors and started to do command line pings to check it out. Here is what I got:

C:\Windows\system32>ping www.google.com

Pinging google.navigation.opendns.com [208.69.32.231] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 208.69.32.231: bytes=32 time=144ms TTL=50
Request timed out.
Reply from 208.69.32.231: bytes=32 time=101ms TTL=50
Reply from 208.69.32.231: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=50

Ping statistics for 208.69.32.231:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 3, Lost = 1 (25% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 101ms, Maximum = 144ms, Average = 123ms

I did a few others before this as well with them both coming up with 2+ responses of "Request timed out." as well. Any suggestions?

#13 Orecomm

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 12:17 AM

Yes, Tomato is one of the class of Linux router loads available, and a pretty good one. The big question is whether it will run on the specific model and revision of router you have. Be sure, be very sure, before you begin. Tomato's website also has links at the bottom of the page to several other options if it doesn't match your hardware.

As for your pings, it looks like you are dropping packets. Now the question is where are the packets being dropped. Try using traceroute instead of ping [tracert <destination> in Windows cmd window]. It will try 3 times to send a packet to each "hop" along the path. The first "hop" should be your wireless router. The next should be your ISP's edge router. The others are various routers encountered on the way to the destination. Each should show 3 numbers, the response time for each query packet, or else an asterisk (*) which means the packet was lost. Look to see where the first packet loss occurs. Once you have a suspect you can try using ping on the nodes before and after it in the list to narrow things down. If the problem is between you and your router (the first hop) it is most likely a wireless signal strength or interference issue. If it is on the second link it is between you and your ISP. You might call them for assistance at that point. If it is beyond that then you are pretty much stuck. You can raise the issue with your ISP and see if they can do anything about it, but chances are the ownership of the problem is lost in the bowels of the Internet.

#14 SmokeViper07

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 05:29 PM

Thanks alot for all of your help, I just used your tracert suggestion to find out that it was losing packets on the 2nd hop and according to what you have said, that means the issue lies with my ISP. This helps alot, I will call them up and now can be sure they will not give me the run around. I will reply with my results.

#15 SmokeViper07

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 12:46 PM

Update: issue was not with the ISP or atleast the tech had no idea where the hop was going to that was timing out but he did say that my connection issue is most likely with my router. Would anyone be able to recommend good wireless routers for gaming and lots of downloading?




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