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Media Player Connecting to Unfamiliar Web Sites


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#1 maximianusherculius

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 01:46 AM

I have some videos that I play from a usb stick. When I play them, Online Armor shows wmplayer tcp connections to what I assume is a website in the country that they originated from. There is also an "FFDShow" icon that comes up on the toolbar. I recognize that from the codec pack that I downloaded from CNET. THis only happens with a handful of videos. There are no browsers connected to the internet when this happens. If I click to terminate the process, the video stops and I have to restart it. When I click to close the connection the media player continues to play and the connections to the suspect destinations stop. This happens with the same videos every time I play them unless I disconnect my internet service.

I have recently run combofix with the help of an expert. SAS and MBAM come up clean.

What does this seemingly odd behavior mean?
Windows XP Professional 2002 sp3 32bit (ACPI Multiprocessor PC); Google Chrome and Mozilla w/Keyscramble
Processors: Twin Dual Core E5200's @ 2.5 GHz & 2 GB of RAM;..... MOTHERBOARD: INTEL
Hard Drive: Seagate 240GB ST3250310AS;..... SECURITY: Realtime is Avira (free) and Online Armor (free)
DVD/CD Drive: ATAPI DVD A DH20A4P;..... MALWARE Scanners: MBAM, SAS
WIRELESS: Linksys Wireless-N USB Network Adapter;..... DISPLAY Adaptors: NVIDIA GeForce 7300 SE/7200 GS

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#2 maximianusherculius

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:38 PM

The following piece from wikipedia explains why I might have experienced this seemingly unusual or unnoticed connection event.


Digital rights management (DRM) is a generic term for access control technologies that can be used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to try to impose limitations on the usage of digital content and devices. It is also, sometimes, disparagingly described as Digital Restrictions Management. The term is used to describe any technology which inhibits uses (legitimate or otherwise) of digital content that were not desired or foreseen by the content provider. The term generally doesn't refer to other forms of copy protection which can be circumvented without modifying the file or device, such as serial numbers or keyfiles. It can also refer to restrictions associated with specific instances of digital works or devices. Digital rights management is being used by companies such as Sony, Apple Inc., Microsoft, AOL and the BBC.
The use of digital rights management is controversial. Proponents argue it is needed by copyright holders to prevent unauthorized duplication of their work, either to maintain artistic integrity[1] or to ensure continued revenue streams.[2] Some opponents, such as the Free Software Foundation, maintain that the use of the word "rights" is misleading and suggest that people instead use the term digital restrictions management. Their position is essentially that copyright holders are restricting the use of material in ways that are beyond the scope of existing copyright laws, and should not be covered by future laws.[3] The Electronic Frontier Foundation, and other opponents, also consider DRM systems to be anti-competitive practices.[4]


I had no clue about DRM. If I did, I would not have considered this topic to be so suspicious.
Windows XP Professional 2002 sp3 32bit (ACPI Multiprocessor PC); Google Chrome and Mozilla w/Keyscramble
Processors: Twin Dual Core E5200's @ 2.5 GHz & 2 GB of RAM;..... MOTHERBOARD: INTEL
Hard Drive: Seagate 240GB ST3250310AS;..... SECURITY: Realtime is Avira (free) and Online Armor (free)
DVD/CD Drive: ATAPI DVD A DH20A4P;..... MALWARE Scanners: MBAM, SAS
WIRELESS: Linksys Wireless-N USB Network Adapter;..... DISPLAY Adaptors: NVIDIA GeForce 7300 SE/7200 GS

#3 Capn Easy

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 12:10 AM

It's possible, I guess. I have generic MP3 players that won't work with DRM files, so I try to avoid them. I also don't use Media Player, so I may be of limited use to you.

But, what -- precisely -- are the files you are playing that are connecting to the web? The whole filename PLUS dot extension. Is it possible that you don't actually have the video, but a link to a remote site that then streams the video?

#4 maximianusherculius

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 01:43 AM

That is an excellent question. I can tell you for sure that I have everything in my possession. I know this because they will play whether my internet connection is plugged in or not.

Maybe it is both. I am playing the file that I have and its link exists in my usb stick as well, thus triggering the connection by WMPlayer when my internet connection is plugged in. See, I told you it was a great question! :thumbsup:
Windows XP Professional 2002 sp3 32bit (ACPI Multiprocessor PC); Google Chrome and Mozilla w/Keyscramble
Processors: Twin Dual Core E5200's @ 2.5 GHz & 2 GB of RAM;..... MOTHERBOARD: INTEL
Hard Drive: Seagate 240GB ST3250310AS;..... SECURITY: Realtime is Avira (free) and Online Armor (free)
DVD/CD Drive: ATAPI DVD A DH20A4P;..... MALWARE Scanners: MBAM, SAS
WIRELESS: Linksys Wireless-N USB Network Adapter;..... DISPLAY Adaptors: NVIDIA GeForce 7300 SE/7200 GS




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