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Combofix


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#1 jbum

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 08:19 PM

After running combofix I can not connect to the net I have repaired, rebooted, disabled and everything I can think of. When I run ipconfig I am getting the right info. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Moved topic from XP to the more appropriate forum. Also added a topic descriptor. ~ Animal

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#2 garmanma

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 10:28 PM

Log on as an administrator, go Start > Run and type: "cmd". In the window that appears type: "netsh winsock reset". When the program is finished, you will receive the message: "Successfully reset the Winsock Catalog. You must restart the machine in order to complete the reset." Close the command box and reboot your computer.

Go Start > Run > type: "cmd" In the window that appears type: "ipconfig /flushdns". Close the command box.

Go Start > Control Panel > Network Connections. Right click on your default connection, usually Local Area Connection or Dial-up Connection if you are using Dial-up, and and choose Properties. Double-click on the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) item. Select the radio button that says "Obtain DNS servers automatically". Reboot.

Warning: Some Internet Service Providers need specific DNS settings. You need to make sure that you know if such DNS settings are required before you make this change.

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#3 jbum

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 10:47 PM

Thank you so much but what the heck put the dns server addy in there never seen that before.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 01:50 PM

There are Trojan infections (DNSChanger) which can alter DNS settings and redirect your browser to their DNS Server or other unwanted sites.

...rogue DNS servers are part of click fraud and leakage of personal information...we discovered that this network is now targeting four of the most popular search engines. In a large scale click fraud scheme, the ZLOB gang appears to hijack search results and to replace sponsored links with DNS “tricks”.

ZLOB Enters The Search Engine Market

A new Trojan horse masquerading as a video "codec" required to view content on certain Web sites tries to change key settings on the victim's Internet router so that all of the victim's Web traffic is routed through servers controlled by the attackers.

...recent versions of the ubiquitous "Zlob" Trojan (also known as DNSChanger) will check to see if the victim uses a wireless or wired hardware router. If so, it tries to guess the password needed to administer the router by consulting a built-in list of default router username/password combinations. If successful, the malware alters the victim's domain name system (DNS) records so that all future traffic passes through the attacker's network first. DNS can be thought of as the Internet's phone book, translating human-friendly names like example.com into numeric addresses that are easier for networking equipment to handle.

Malware Silently Alters Wireless Router Settings

Edited by quietman7, 29 January 2010 - 01:51 PM.

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