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Mobo or HDD fried after Power Outage??


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#1 Sykotik

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 10:46 PM

hello all, I am feeling a little confused, but I had a power outage a little while ago, and my PSU went out because of it. Yes the computer was plugged into a power strip. I just replaced the PSU and thankfully, the computer starts up. However, the computer is completely freezing at POST. There are no error beeps, nothing extra is plugged in (only the keyboard and monitor are currently plugged into the tower). I have a HP Pavilion a1110y. The old PSU was a Bestec Model ATX-300-12Z 300W, while the new PSU is Green Power Switching Supply ATX-580W 580W, 2.5GB RAM installed. Any help or ideas? I have read that Bestec's aren't the greatest PSU's and that when they go bad they often take the MOBO or HDD with it. I'm hoping that this is not that type of case, but are there other avenues that I could use to test out the MOBO and HDD? Thank you, if more info is needed I will get it to ya!

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 11:36 PM

Caution: There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges your body may have stored before touching any of the components inside. As a safety precaution you should unplug the computer to avoid electrical shock.
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The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test the PSU.

Caution: This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.


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From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.
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At this point you can use a DC Voltage meter to read the different rail Voltages. You will want to insert the black probe into any of the Black (-) sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the five different colored sockets, one at a time. Below are the five different colors and their corresponding rail Voltages. The Voltages should be within about ten percent of the given values.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 11:38 PM

that procedure should tell you if the PSU you got is bad or not, otherwise chances are the previouse PSU damaged other components as well, I would try swapping as many components as possible with another computer if available, one at a time, to check.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#4 Sykotik

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 06:22 PM

thanks for the info! i checked the psu with another computer and it works fine. i am getting ready to test the HDD with another computer, but i have no way to power up the mobo with another computer. i think that the mobo was definately damaged somehow, since i get absolutely no error codes at all, even with all the ram taken out and the HDD not plugged into the mobo. even when the keyboard is not plugged in, i get no error codes, it just freezes. however, i did notice that upon starting up a couple of times the POST screen came up scrambled. i took a pic of it with my phone, dont know if posting it would help anyone or not, but i had the fleeting thought that maybe the video card was damaged also. not entirely sure, but will keep you all updated thanks!

#5 the_patriot11

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 07:54 PM

well, sounds like a motherboard. simple solution is try all the other components in another system if possible, if they all work in the other system then its definitly the motherboard. though, normally in a power outtage the PSU fries first and then takes mobo out, but theres exceptions to every rule, and they may not have been caused by the power outtage but just a coincidence to.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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