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Adding a hard drive


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#1 raf96

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 05:50 AM

Hi guys.
So here's the thing... I have a small 120gb SATA I hard drive and I want to add a new sata II 750gb hard drive... simple enough right? I thought I'm just gonna install it as a slave drive and that's it, but the more I read about it the more questions come up...

So...
1. I'd like to install windows 7 on the new drive, but I've read that having multiple OS can cause various problems. So what do you tech-savvy guys think. I don't want to loose my xp setup... you know (just in case), so is it worth installing second OS? Maybe I should forgo my old XP and just start from the scratch?

2. If I install a second drive as a slave drive, will I lose SATA II transfer capabilities? Maybe I should install it as a main drive and put old drive as a slave? I'm asking, because I've read that when you put a jumper in, it limits SATA II to SATA I capabilities. I don't know if it's true or not, but I'd like to get the most out of my new drive.

3. can my PC handle windows 7? I've got...
AMD athlon 2800+
2,08ghz 2gb of ram
MoBo is a ABIT- NF7


Thank you

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#2 ReviverSoft

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 08:35 AM

*For the best setup, make the newer, faster hard disk as the Primary device and the older one as Secondary (slave). But first, make sure your motherboard supports SATAII.

*I wouldn't really suggest a dual boot, stick to a single OS.

can my PC handle windows 7?


*Take a look: Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor

Edited by ReviverSoft, 19 January 2010 - 05:43 PM.

ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#3 hamluis

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 10:07 AM

<<...but I've read that having multiple OS can cause various problems>>

Such as what?

Users have been dual-booting for eons now...that's the first time I've ever seen anyone make such a statement.

I have XP Home and Win 7 dual-booted (each on separate drives), as have various others.

<<...because I've read that when you put a jumper in, it limits SATA II to SATA I capabilities>>

Well...a jumper only applies to a particular drive...it can have no impact on any other drive. The need to use jumpers on SATA drives is limited to users whose older systems/motherboards do not support higher SATA speeds, in which case it is the motherboard/system which is the limiting factor...not any other drives attached.

Louis

#4 ReviverSoft

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 04:09 PM

I think raf96 was referring to the cross-compatibility among programs installed for each operating system.

Installing the operating systems on separate drives, like hamluis pointed out, would be ideal.
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#5 raf96

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 05:38 PM

I didn't receive my hard drive yet (few more days I guess), but most likely I'll get back to you all. as soon as I receive it. So far all I can do is thank you for taking an interest in my post... (if your advices won't work I'll curse the sh$T out of you :thumbsup:)
But seriously... I'm grateful for your help, and I will let ya' know how it works out for me so other members can benefit from this.

BTW... I've done a lot of research about this, and first of all... I'd like to point out to this sites community that SATA II is sort of "made up term" that doesn't guarantee you transfer rates that are specified just by calling it "SATA II".
"Sata II" was supposedly have a minimum transfer rate of 3gb, which is not true. since it's unregulated by the trade mark commision, anyone can claim their hard drive to be "SATA II compatible" (it's more complicated than that) ... so now , every hard drive manufacturer is claiming to be a "SATA II". and this... I repeat... this is not a next generation technology!!!
It is nothing more than a promotional scheme.

Just something I've learned so far. If you have something to contradict that, please post it here.

I'm paraphrasing but the jist is there

#6 ReviverSoft

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 05:46 PM

Yeah, it is to be referred to as SATA II.

Popular usage refers to the SATA 3 Gbit/s specification as Serial ATA II (SATA II or SATA2), contrary to the wishes of the Serial ATA International Organization (SATA-IO) which defines the standard. SATA II was originally the name of a committee defining updated SATA standards, of which the 3 Gbit/s standard was just one. However since it was among the most prominent features defined by the former SATA II committee, and, more critically, the term "II" is commonly used for successors, the name SATA II became synonymous with the 3 Gbit/s standard, so the group has since changed names to the Serial ATA International Organization, or SATA-IO, to avoid further confusion.

As of 2009, "SATA II" and "SATA 2" are the most common marketing terms for any "second-generation" SATA drives, controllers or related accessories. Unfortunately, these terms have no specific meaning, since they are not the proper official nomenclature. Also, the second-generation SATA standards only define a set of optional features (3 Gb/s, NCQ Native Command Queuing, staggered spin-up and hot-plugging) improving on the first generation technology, but don't require including those features. Almost any SATA product with any set of features could legitimately be described as "compatible" with these standards. Only careful research can determine which features may be included in any particular "SATA II" product. [11] [12]

In order to avoid parallels to the common SATA II misnomer, the SATA-IO has compiled a set of marketing guidelines for the third revision of the specification. The specification should be called Serial ATA International Organization: Serial ATA Revision 3.0, and the technology itself is to be referred to as SATA 6Gb/s. A product using this standard should be called the SATA 6Gb/s [product name].


So you should be looking for a SATA 3Gb/s , NCQ hard disk. :thumbsup:
ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#7 raf96

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 05:56 PM

although it is not the same text as I have read (and many others), it does refer to the same idea... SATA I/O... yeah that will solve the confusion [eyeroll}

#8 ReviverSoft

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 06:30 PM

SATA drives are backward compatible, so you don't really need to worry about that.
ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#9 raf96

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 08:11 AM

WTF?!?
I have a problem and I'm about to explode...
This a connection I've got...
Posted Image

And this is what I have gotten in my new hard drive...


Posted Image

Can someone please explain me where did I go wrong, and what can I do now? PLEASE?!? :thumbsup:
(the tone of my post is with a "asking for help smile")

Edited by raf96, 29 January 2010 - 08:19 AM.


#10 ThunderZ

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 09:46 AM

Top picture (old drive) Is an Ide or PATA drive.

Bottom picture (new drive) is a SATA.

They require two different types of data transfer cables. The wide, probably gray, one that connected you current hard drive to the mobo. The SATA (new) drive need`s a SATA cable. Might be any color and is about an inch wide.

Downloaded the mobo manual from the ABIT site to see if it supported SATA. There are 8 different versions of your board. NF7, NF7 V2.0, NF7-M, NF7-S, NF7-S2, NF7-S2G, NF7-V.

I grabbed the NF7 manual since that is what is listed as your system specs in your first post. According to it. If your board version is not at least a -S, -S2, or -S2G then it will not have the proper ports on the board and your new drive will not work with it.

You should be able to find the markings on the board to tell you the version of the board. If you have a mobo manual pull it out and compare the picture to the board. It will show the location of the SATA ports on the board if yours is equipped with them. If you do`t have a manual then it can be downloaded HERE.

#11 hamluis

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 10:37 AM

Example of SATA Controller Card, which allows older motherboards/systems to take advantage of more current hard drives.

Only requirement is empty PCI slot in system, appropriate connector from power supply to drive, and cable connecting SATA drive to installed controller card.

If current PSU is lacking proper connector, a SATA PSU Connector may be needed. I believe that SATA drives normally come with such, that's been my experience.

Louis

#12 raf96

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 10:58 AM

I'll respond properly once I get my sata cables... oh yeah... I do have a sata on my mobo... (obviously)... will get back...

#13 raf96

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 05:19 AM

OK, guys, so I've got the sata cables, I've connected it, enabled sata in my bios, and.... nothing... It won't boot up.

It says that it finds my new drive on sata bios... it says.
Primary drive: (symbol of my new drive) and then it just sits there.
Also it says press f4 or ctrl+s to enter raid bios, but when I hit it, it doesn't respond.

I've tried to insert my original XP CD and try to boot up from CD, but it won't even get to the point where it asks you "press any key, to boot from cd".

So at this point I'm lost... maybe it installs something and I should wait much longer (I've waited several minutes).

Any ideas?... maybe my bios should be flashed or something? Problem is I'm a bit afraid to do that, cauz' I'm not precisely sure how to do that. well... it's not hard, but I'm afraid that I'll pick a wrong file and screw the whole thing up.(edit) I was actually gonna do it but since I don't have a floppy drive I was gonna use flash drive, except I can't change the boot order because USB is not on the list.

All that is on the list...

Floppy
LS120
HDD-0
SCSI
HDD-1
HDD-2
HDD-3
zip100
LAN
Serial ATA
or disabled

BTW my mobo is abit-nf7 (s) v.2.0
SiI 3112A SataRaid Bios 4.2.12
and the new drive is Seagate barracuda7200.12 750GB


I'm reading and reading about it, but for the hell of me, I can't figure out what to do.

(And it was supposed be soooo simple, or so I thought :thumbsup:)

Edited by raf96, 31 January 2010 - 09:17 AM.


#14 hamluis

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 11:14 AM

From what I see...you have a SATAII drive, with a system onboard SATA controller that is only SATAI capable.

Some SATAII drives must be jumpered to be recognized by older motherboards/controllers. See

Configuring The Drive, page 22.

Louis

#15 raf96

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 11:52 AM

yeah, I've seen it, and I want to try it but, they had to make it hard for me as well... standard jumper is bigger and it won't fit in the slot, I could push it in there, but then I won't be able to get it out and I'm not sure if that standard jumper will make a connection on those skinnier pins.
I'm telling you buddy, the more I go in the more problems I find.




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