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Checking free and used space on your partitions


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#1 Guest_Plimsol_*

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 11:56 AM

In order to see how much free space or used space you have on your partitions you can use the df command.

To see output that is easily understood you should use the following syntax:

df -hk

This will print out a table of your partitions, how much space is used on them, and how much free space is available.

By using the -h argument, you specify that the numbers should be listed in human readable terms like M for Megabyte or G for Gigabyte.

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#2 Gumdrop

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 04:40 AM

I know this is an old post, but I'm reading everything here.....I want to LEARN!! :thumbsup:

What are partitions, exactly?? I've seen them mentioned elsewhere too in reading here at this great board, bleepingcomputer.com!! Any simple kind of explanation of 'partitions'??


Also, can you give more how-to info on the post above?? I'm interested.

Thanks. :flowers:


Edit: I may not post much, but I'm always here reading and taking notes!!!

Edited by Gumdrop, 08 May 2005 - 04:43 AM.



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#3 jgweed

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 12:14 PM

This article explains what partitions do and how they work:

http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/R...partitions.html

Partitions allow a single disk drive to be accessed by the operating system as if it were several independent disks. Originally disks were partitioned because operating systems were designed to read disks of limited sizes that were soon exceeded by hardware capabilities (who would have thought that disks would increase to 120GIGs so quickly?). Now, however, partitions serve more to segregate one large disk by functionality, allowing space for the OS, and then additional partitions for storage of information, etc. This logical arrangement also makes maintenance much easier for the user.

Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#4 Gumdrop

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 11:23 PM

This article explains what partitions do and how they work:

http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/R...partitions.html

Partitions allow a single disk drive to be accessed by the operating system as if it were several independent disks. Originally disks were partitioned because operating systems were designed to read disks of limited sizes that were soon exceeded by hardware capabilities (who would have thought that disks would increase to 120GIGs so quickly?). Now, however, partitions serve more to segregate one large disk by functionality, allowing space for the OS, and then additional partitions for storage of information, etc. This logical arrangement also makes maintenance much easier for the user.

Regards,
John

Thanks, JG. The link didn't work for me, but that's okay; I can Google, which I should have done instead of asking---I just thought it might be easier to understand here.. I was cheating. :thumbsup:


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#5 jgweed

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Posted 09 May 2005 - 12:31 PM

Sorry about the link. I hope my own somewhat simplified explanation was at least enough to answer your immediate question; sometimes a brief answer is all you need, and then you can decide whether you want to pursue further research about the topic.
Cheers,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#6 Gumdrop

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 09:39 PM

Yes, John, your explanation helped. I'm still reading up on it too. Thanks!


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