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THIS is the problem with the English language


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#1 TheEgg

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 09:53 PM

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qi...16075752AASEH4l

There are so many useless words that no one ever uses. Most of those useless words are just synonyms for common words that no one ever uses. (The synonyms are the words that no one uses, not the common words. Thats another problem with the language)

Now for the word exceed, there appears to be no good single word antonym. I wanted to say the opposite of "This thing exceeded my expectations", but I can't think of a good way to say it. Oh well, I don't really care. But I think that there are words that the dictionary actually needs, yet people over the years have filled it with more words than it doesn't need.

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#2 Orange Blossom

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 10:58 PM

In which case, you can use a multi-word antonym.

This thing failed to meet my expectations.

Note that synonyms do have slight differences in meaning and usage. A very good dictionary will provide the nuances in meaning. I always use a good dictionary to find synonyms, never a thesaurus which fails to provide those meanings resulting in misuse of "synonyms".

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#3 TheEgg

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 01:48 AM

lol. THAT'S the word(s) I was looking for. I couldnt think of it.

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 03:12 AM

this thing blew my expectations away. :D

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#5 Nawtheasta

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 12:51 PM

I always thought cuspidor was a word that deserved better. It means spittoon ( Think chewing tobacco) ([Portuguese, from cuspir, to spit, from Latin c nspuere, to spit upon).

Just kind of feels good to say.

“How very cuspidorian”

“ He is of the cuspidor clan”
or
“ This new malware is a real cuspidor”

Oh well , idea thoughts from ideal time I do not have.
Regards
Nawtheasta

#6 Surma

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 04:20 PM

boxing rings are square...
---My computer---
Manufacturer:HP Pavilion 061 CPU:Intel Pentium 4 640, 3200 MHz (16 x 200) RAM: 1024MB Motherboard:Asus PTGD1-LA Chipset:Intel Grantsdale i915P HDD:Main256GB Ext512GB Video:Radeon X600 Series Internet:DSL 2mb/s OS:Windows XP Home Edition SP3 Firefox+IExplorer AVG Internet Security

#7 Orange Blossom

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 05:03 PM

this thing blew my expectations away. :D


The problem with this possibility is the meaning is ambiguous: it could mean either greatly exceeded or abysmally failed to meet my expectations.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:
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#8 buddy215

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 06:32 PM

Unmet expectations:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&sou...met&aqi=g10

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss

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#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 06:36 PM

this thing blew my expectations away. :D


The problem with this possibility is the meaning is ambiguous: it could mean either greatly exceeded or abysmally failed to meet my expectations.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:


my point exactly, hence, another problem with the english langauge ;)

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#10 woodyblade

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 06:48 PM

There are so many useless words that no one ever uses. Most of those useless words are just synonyms for common words that no one ever uses. (The synonyms are the words that no one uses, not the common words. Thats another problem with the language)


Yeah there might be useless words but someone must use them, having written reports one thing for writing a proper report is to not repeat words i.e. not use the same word twice in a sentence, meaning synonyms are important to writing reports, the flexibility of English at least in the amount of words available that mean the same thing, means I can use a variety of words to complete a report.

Where as say someone speaking French, German or most other languages doesn't have such a wide choice, I can't remember the exact quote but having read a book by Bill Bryson on the English language (the book is called "Mother Tongue", it's basically a history on how the English language came to be, pronunciations, spellings creation of words etc, good and bad things about it and its place as the recognised business and international language), anyway it said something like on average an English speaker can use or knows around 30,000-40,000 words where as a French speaker knows somewhere in the region of 10,000-20,000 words a decent shortfall on the variety of words available to us.

An obvious bad thing is the rules on how to use English, it was a language formed around the strict rules of Latin leading to English being one of the top 5 hardest languages to learn.

Just as an additional point to prove some variety, the word "simples" was added to the Oxford English dictionary recently, it has quickly become a well known word/phrase here in the UK meaning something that is easy to understand or achieve, Simples :thumbsup: - http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/...dictionary.html

#11 JohnWho

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 07:31 PM

Is this the place to bring back this poem? -

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.


:thumbsup:


I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!


#12 Orange Blossom

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 08:04 PM

And therein is proof positive that one should not rely on spell-checker.

Nice poem by-the-way. :thumbsup:

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#13 Capn Easy

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 04:19 AM

I am disappointed.

:thumbsup:

#14 Capn Easy

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:50 PM

Once there was an English teacher who explained to his class that, in English, a double negative would mean a positive, but that a double positive would not mean a negative.

One of his students was heard to say, "Yeah, right!"

#15 Animal

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:00 PM

Here is my 2 cents on the language: kernel vs colonel and whats up with 3 spellings that sound alike: pair, pare and pear.

I mean seriously colonel??? :thumbsup:

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