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computers and electrophoresis/ related issues


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#1 Tracer3

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:07 PM

In another forum the writer mentioned he thought there may be a problem with incompatible metals coming into contact with each other. I see electrophoresis in my work every day and it is never a good thing. It is considered a "finding" and I write it up. On the installation of a new motherboard I am concerned that this may be a little discussed issue. EMI is discussed somewhat - not much, but with the micro connections in computers, electron transfer takes on a sinister dimension. I am considering isolating dissimilar metals on my computer and using a jumper to ground my internals. If static or EMI disturb the works it seems logical that electrophoresis would be very bad indeed and possibly overlooked by most. This is a broad topic so any intelligent feedback is welcome.

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:44 PM

it can indeed be a problem, that is why when I work on a computer or I when I help others work on one, there are some tricks to keep in mind. A: keep yourself well grouned. they make special bracelets to help dissipate static discharge, but i dont even have one and most people don't, so tricks there is to try to do it on non carpet surfaces (cement, linoleum, etc. if you don't have a choice, take off your socks. B: ALWAYs touch something metal before any computer component, and DONT move your feet after you do so. if you do have to move your feet, touch something metal again before touching the computer components. this is actually the number one thing to do when working with computers, I believe, on any surface. if your not sure, touch something metal. the metal of the case does work for this. C: DO NOT use custom mounts for the motherboard, use only the ones provided with the case or motherboard, or of the same type, and only use the screws provided. The mounts, and screws that come with the case/motherboard are specially designed NOT to fry computer components. If you use your own screw for example, and the head is to big there is a possibility it will come in contact with components of the motherboard and cause a short. While a screw or mount made of the wrong type of metal, can also cause a short. D: DO use mounts. if you dont have them, dont install the motherboard. the motherboard tray will short out a motherboard in short order. E: DO NOT get thermal interface fluid on the motherboard, it can cause a short to. anyway here are some quick tips. :D

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#3 Tracer3

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:14 PM

Thanks for the advice - I listened well and will do as you say. Sorry it took so long to reply but i have been working 16hrs. On another topic, or rather back to a topic - incompatible metal contact. The motherboard has contacts around the screw holes which appear to be solder tin/lead/zinc compound i believe is used in electronics, the screws are zinc coated pot metal, the stand offs appear to be brass and are connected to a steel surface. The steel is 1mm (good case) but there are dozens of types and manufacturers usually use whatever is they have. The zinc coated pot metal screw goes through the motherboard into the brass mounts and when flushed up they are also in contact with the solder. Here is the potential problem I see. The screws on threading into the stand-offs will lose some of the zinc coating - a inert metal but not the same as the board solder, the standoffs or the steel off the motherboard mounting plate.
Here are my thoughts. When water travels through a pipe there is an electrical charge present - Houses use the copper pipe at the water heater to attach a ground. At this point the corrosion begins at the valve connection unless a di-electric union is used, which is almost never. Both grounds and neutrals have a current, though a small one. What happens is the fittings are brass and the pipe is copper causing extreme electrophoresis (corrosion commonly called rust). Look at any house more than a year old and this condition is present on all valves in the house (look under any sink at a shut off valve). There is a white residue. it Will eventually become green with time. This is the action of dissimilar metal contact carrying a electrical charge. They metals have been busy exchanging electrons - sort of metal sex. This process does not require water to work. Condensation or humidity work well. If there is a grounding attached to the slab rebar ( as it sometimes is ) it can eat the rebar throughout the entire slab by a similar action described.
My point - zinc/pot metal/ solder/brass/and steel have all the ingredients to distort electron flow when in contact with each other - they are having sex and do not want to be disturbed. Electricity is nothing more then electrons being transferred through a conductor producing a current, and heat. If static electricity harms components, then my scenario of unwanted electron transfer cannot be far off base. In a regulated state: of heat, no unwanted electron transfer, and a steady state volt and amp ratio - computer components should never wear out. OK I'm done. Later - Tracer

#4 vpoffice

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 09:16 PM

thanks your your sharing...




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