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Possibly infected, unknown IPs from ports activities


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4 replies to this topic

#1 TheUltimateCow

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:07 AM

Hi everyone,

I need some opinions on either I am infected or not as I have no clues at all this time.
I am using Windows XP SP3. Usually, I thought that when I am not running any programs, there should not be any unfamiliar port connections (listening, connected, or waiting to disconnect), but today something strange happened and there are many unfamiliar ports shown from the process explorer I use.

So simply put: my Norton Framwork crashed -> restart and the Automatic Update service is gone and could not be reinstalled -> Unfamiliar IPs and ports listening or connected

Detailed list of what happened today:

-First, after dinner, I restarted my computer just because Norton Framework crashed randomly(doesn't seem like it now).
-Then when it restarted, the Notifier told me that "Automatic Update is turned off....".
And then when I went to System Security Center to turn it on, it says "We're sorry. Security Center could not change the Automatic Updates settings. ..." Then I tried to turn it on in Updates tab under System Properties, but it is not even turned off. I thought it was strange, so I went to services.msc, and COULD NOT find the Automatic Update service.
So again I thought, "maybe it's just accidental". So I tried to reinstall the service by using this in the command line "%SystemRoot%\System32\rundll32.exe setupapi,InstallHinfSection AutoUpdate 132 %SystemRoot%\inf\au.inf", and restarted my system. It did not work, same alert popped up: "Automatic Update is turned off..." Now I got a feeling that something is off, and it is definitely something I have never encountered before.

-Secondly, after that diagnose above, I suspected that it might be an attack. So I opened my process explorer, and not surprisingly, I had many unfamiliar ports "listening"

-The third thing is that the System Log was corrupted after this happened, other logs were fine.

EDIT*:Pictures
Right when the computer starts
Posted Image
With Firefox open
Posted Image
After closing firefox
Posted Image
Sorry for using a Chinese software, here is the status translation:
Posted Image

Those IPs keeps changing, well, I don't know...

So, am I likely infected? I feel very unsafe to go on any games, login to amazon/ebay, or just staying connected in general...
Since it is late here, I guess I might not get a response right away, so for the time being, I will disconnect my internet and scan with Malwarebytes(with the latest defination).

Any help will be appreciated. Thank you!
~Cow

Edited by TheUltimateCow, 11 January 2010 - 02:02 AM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:55 AM

A port (TCP/UDP) is an address associated with a particular process on a computer. Ports have a unique number in the header of a data packet that is used to map this data to that process. Port numbers are divided into three ranges: Well Known Ports, Registered Ports, and Dynamic/Private Ports. Default port values for commonly used TCP/IP services have values lower than 255 and Well Known Ports have numbers that range from 0 to 1023. Registered Ports range from 1024 to 49151 and Dynamic/Private Ports range from 49152 to 65535. An "open port" is a TCP/IP port number that is configured to accept packets while a "closed port" is one that is set to deny all packets with that port number.Hackers use "port scanning" to search for vulnerable computers with open ports using IP addresses or a group of random IP address ranges so they can break in and install malicious programs (viruses, Trojans). Botnets and Zombie computers scour the net, randomly scanning a block of IP addresses, searching for vulnerable ports - commonly probed ports and make repeated attempts to access them. If your computer is sending out large amounts of data, that can indicate that your system may have a virus or a Trojan.

If your firewall provides an alert which indicates it has blocked access to a port that does not necessarily mean your system has been compromised. These alert messages are a response to unrequested traffic from remote computers (an external host) to access a port on your computer. Alerts are often classified by the network port they arrive on, and they allow the firewall to notify you in various ways about possible penetration and intrusion attempts on your computer. It is not unusual for a firewall to provide numerous alerts regarding such attempted access. However, not all unrequested traffic is malevolent. Even your ISP will send out regular checks to see if your computer is still there, so you may need to investigate an attempted intrusion.

You can use netstat, a command-line tool that displays incoming and outgoing network connections, from a command prompt to obtain Local/Foreign Addresses, PID and listening state.
  • netstat /? lists all available parameters that can be used.
  • netstat -a lists all active TCP connections and the TCP and UDP ports on which the computer is listening.
  • netstat -b lists all active TCP connections, Foreign Address, State and process ID (PID) for each connection.
  • netstat -n lists active TCP connections. Addresses and port numbers are expressed numerically; no attempt is made to determine names.
  • netstat -o lists active TCP connections and includes the process ID (PID) for each connection. You can find the application based on the PID on the Processes tab in Windows Task Manager. This parameter can be combined with -a, -n, and -p (example: netstat -ano).
-- If the port in question is listed as "Listening" there is a possibility that it is in use by a Trojan server but your firewall, if properly configured, should have blocked any attempt to access it.

You can use Process Monitor, an advanced monitoring tool for Windows that shows real-time file system, Registry and process/thread activity or various network traffic monitoring tools for troubleshooting and malware investigation.

There are third party utilities that will allow you to manage, block, and view detailed listings of all TCP and UDP endpoints on your system, including local/remote addresses, state of TCP connections and the process that opened the port:Caution: If you're going to start blocking ports, be careful which ones you block or you may lose Internet connectivity. For a list of TCP/UDP ports and notes about them, please refer to:You can investigate IP addresses and gather additional information at:

Edited by quietman7, 11 January 2010 - 07:57 AM.

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#3 TheUltimateCow

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:02 PM

Thank a lot queitman7! I guess I was just being paranoid...
I scanned my computer with Malwarebytes and cleaned out a few trojans and other infections:
Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware 1.44
Database version: 3539
Windows 5.1.2600 Service Pack 3
Internet Explorer 8.0.6001.18702

2010-1-11 1:35:02
mbam-log-2010-01-11 (01-35-02).txt

Scan type: Quick Scan
Objects scanned: 192636
Time elapsed: 23 minute(s), 36 second(s)

Memory Processes Infected: 0
Memory Modules Infected: 0
Registry Keys Infected: 3
Registry Values Infected: 0
Registry Data Items Infected: 0
Folders Infected: 4
Files Infected: 6

Memory Processes Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Memory Modules Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Keys Infected:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Ext\PreApproved\{e5d5d4a1-17f0-41d7-b1c6-0979f91e6f46} (Adware.BDSearch) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\FlySky (Malware.Trace) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Baidu (Trojan.Cinmus) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Registry Values Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Registry Data Items Infected:
(No malicious items detected)

Folders Infected:
D:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\12315004 (Rogue.Multiple) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application Data\Baidu (Trojan.Cinmus) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application Data\Baidu\Toolbar (Trojan.Cinmus) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application Data\Baidu\Toolbar\Custom Buttons (Trojan.Cinmus) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.

Files Infected:
D:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\12315004\12315004 (Rogue.Multiple) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Application Data\Baidu\Toolbar\Custom Buttons\custom.xml (Trojan.Cinmus) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Local Settings\Temp\krnln.fnr (Trojan.Agent) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\Guestz\Local Settings\Temp\d.exe (Trojan.Dropper) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\Documents and Settings\UserName\Local Settings\Temp\d.exe (Trojan.Dropper) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
D:\WINDOWS\EXPLORER.MS (Heuristics.Reserved.Word.Exploit) -> Quarantined and deleted successfully.
[size=4]

Edit: Problems solved. For AU, I downloaded WUA standalone installer and fixed the problem. Thanks for he explanation for IP and ports.

Edited by TheUltimateCow, 11 January 2010 - 07:17 PM.


#4 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 07:43 AM

You're welcome.

Since some malware was found and removed, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Posted Image > Run... and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista and Windows 7 users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista or Windows 7 and Disk Cleanup in Vista.
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#5 Pandy

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 03:28 PM

Hello,

Now that you have posted a log here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic347971.html you should NOT make further changes to your computer (install/uninstall programs, use special fix tools, delete files, edit the registry, etc) unless advised by a MRT Team member, nor should you ask for help elsewhere. Doing so can result in system changes which may not show in the log you already posted. Further, any modifications you make on your own may cause confusion for the helper assisting you and could complicate the malware removal process which would extend the time it takes to clean your computer.

From this point on the MRT Team should be the only members that you take advice from, until they have verified your log as clean.

Please be patient. It may take a while to get a response because the MRT Team members are EXTREMELY busy working logs posted before yours. They are volunteers who will help you out as soon as possible. Once you have made your post and are waiting, please DO NOT make another reply until it has been responded to by a member of the MRT Team. Generally the staff checks the forum for postings that have 0 replies as this makes it easier for them to identify those who have not been helped. If you post another response there will be 1 reply. A team member, looking for a new log to work may assume another MRT Team member is already assisting you and not open the thread to respond.

Please be patient. It may take several days to get a response but your log will be reviewed and answered as soon as possible. I advise checking your topic once a day for responses as the e-mail notification system is unreliable.

To avoid confusion, I am closing this topic. Good luck with your log.

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