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Mapping a Network Drive


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#1 doe22

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 10:51 AM

So I'm trying to set up a mapped drive (probably X:) for several computers on a small office network. Most of the computers use Windows (a mix of 7, Vista, and XP), and one or two are Macs, but I'll deal with those later. The way we have the network set up is the main part of the office has its own wired network, an offshoot room has its own subnet, and there's wireless throughout. There are a few desktops that can only use wired connections, but mostly we have laptops that generally use wireless but sometimes wire in. What I want to know is if the computers on the three networks can map a drive to a folder on one computer that will serve as our server. This computer is wired in to the main office network.

I thought I could use workgroups for this, but it doesn't seem to be working as the machines only seem able to see computers on their own network within the workgroup. What's more, the machine that will be the server doesn't seem to connect to anything else on the network.

If there's any way to get all the computers mapped to the same folder on that one computer please let me know. Whether it's workgroups or something else, I don't care what it is as long as it works.

Thank you.

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#2 doe22

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 12:56 PM

Okay, no reply yet, so let me add a little more info/description. I've got my main wired network, let's call that network 1. Off of that is a subnet, let's call it 1a. Then I have my wireless network, let's call it network 2. The computers on network 1 can communicate and share files, in fact I've successfully set up a mapped drive on this network already. The computers cannot see any computers on different networks/subnets.

Right now I'm most worried about getting networks 1 & 2 (wired and wireless) talking, if I can't get the subnet working it's not as big a deal. I'm worried that mapping the drive won't be possible because the computer that's acting as the server only has a wired connection, no wireless. Would it only be possible for the wireless computers on network 2 to communicate with the server on network 1 if I set up a wireless adapter on the server? Or am I just going in a completely wrong direction?

In case it isn't obvious, I only know a little about this, so any help at all is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

#3 CaveDweller2

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 01:54 PM

For network 1 - what is the IP address range?

For network 1a - what is the IP address range?

For network 2 - What is the IP address range?

This will help clear things up for me.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#4 doe22

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 02:19 PM

Network 1: 192.168.100.***
Network 1a: 192.168.10.***
Network 2: 172.16.31.***

Need anything else?

#5 doe22

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 03:38 PM

After working on this some more, here's another update. While I was using wireless on a laptop I tried pinging the server on Network 1 using its static ip address and it went through. This surprised me because I can't see the computer when I look for it on the network, but I'll take it. I was able to set up the drive mapping using the ip address rather than the computer's name. So now I'm able to map drives on all computers on networks 1 and 2 (wired and wireless).

The only thing I have left to get is mapping those computers that are on network 1a (the subnet). I've been looking for info on this and what I found said it's impossible for computers on the two networks to communicate. I'm inclined to believe this since I can't ping from one to the other, but I'd like to hear if anyone else knows for certain.

Thanks!

#6 Baltboy

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 03:03 PM

My first question is in a small office why would you have such a complex setup? Why not have them all in the same work group and on the same ip sub net? Unless you have more that 254 pieces of equipment using the LAN everyting can fit under any of those addresses. That would eliminate all of your issues. The whole purpose of creating different subnets is to create separation. However you can allow them to communicate if you install a router between the subnets and configure it with static routes for the opposing subnets.
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#7 doe22

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Posted 20 January 2010 - 10:28 AM

My first question is in a small office why would you have such a complex setup? Why not have them all in the same work group and on the same ip sub net? Unless you have more that 254 pieces of equipment using the LAN everyting can fit under any of those addresses. That would eliminate all of your issues. The whole purpose of creating different subnets is to create separation. However you can allow them to communicate if you install a router between the subnets and configure it with static routes for the opposing subnets.


Thank you for your response, sorry to take so long to get back to you, I was out of the office for a while with no internet connection.

I don't know specifically why the network is set up this way, it was set up well before I came to work here. I assume it's because it's mostly interns using the subnet and my boss didn't want them to have all the access of regular employees, but I'm not sure. I do know, however, that it was set up to the specifications of my boss (the owner of the company), so I'm pretty sure it's going to stay the way it is. Yes, I agree it is unnecessarily complex, but this is what I have to deal with.

I do have things working pretty well now though, so I'm satisfied. Thank you very much for your help.




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