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Wireless-n standard


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#1 Derek Ellis

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 12:46 AM

I am in the looking to possible upgrading to the new 802.11-n standard (wireless-n) either this year or next year (2010 or 2011)

I am confused about it.

Are there two speeds? I have seen 150 and 300 MB/sec.

What is Draft-n?

Is this really going to make a differnce? or should i just hang out until the Wireless -g becomes phased out?

Im not a huge gamer, and i rarley transfer large files. I just would really want to use it for the longer range. it would be great to have my router on one end of the house and be able to pickup a signal on my back porch.

Edited by Derek Ellis, 02 January 2010 - 12:47 AM.


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 08:06 AM

I do not know the technicals but the increase in speed when I switched was very nice, but every time there is a standard they bring something new out!.

Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#3 ThunderZ

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 08:36 AM

DRAFT-N

#4 Derek Ellis

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 07:20 PM

Thanks for the link you sent, but for some reason i really cant stand Wikipedia

I have looked at that a few times, what i am looking for is if anyone has used it yet, or can explain it in Barney Terms. Something simple, not a techincal explaination.

#5 CaveDweller2

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 08:54 PM

This site might be what you are looking for.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#6 Derek Ellis

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 12:28 AM

So....if Wireless-n broadcasts on the 5 GHz band will that affect my cordless home phone? I got the 5 GHz cordless phone because I was told that since the Wireless-g broadcasts on 2.4 GHz, it would interfere with any phone that broadcast the same frequency band.

To add to what i asked eariler, would it be wise to stay with Wireless-g for a while? Right now i am in a small studio Apartment, (less than 750 sq ft), and i am not a gamer or a massive file mover. At the very most i will have 3 computers on my network- my deskop, which is always wired, and my laptop, and a friends laptop when the come visit, which would both be wireless

If i ever move to a bigger place, would the only benefit for me be increased distance that i can get a signal?

Edited by Derek Ellis, 03 January 2010 - 12:34 AM.


#7 CaveDweller2

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 12:48 AM

No the phone won't interfere. Same band(5 GHz) different track(frequency). hehe

If what you have now works for you, why would you upgrade it? Cause you'd have to buy a new router and new wireless card.

You'd have to live in a very large place for G not to cover it.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#8 Derek Ellis

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 01:14 AM

yeah i know the old saying "if it works, dont fix it"

I just was wanting to inqurie about if from anyone else who might be using it already.

I think i might hold out a few years before i decide to upgrade.

So with the phone, was getting a new phone nessicary? Or was the guy at Staples (where i bought a new phone and router) in 2007 just upselling me? Since you said that it will be on the same band but diffrent frequency.

Edited by Derek Ellis, 03 January 2010 - 01:17 AM.


#9 CaveDweller2

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 01:41 AM

I copied this from somewhere else. But it does a good job splaining it all

The problem is in the way that 802.11b/g operates and the way that many cordless phones operate.
Wifi (802.11b) is a direct sequence spread spectrum technology, that is in the 2.4 - 2.483 ghz spectrum, Wifi uses channels that are 22 mhz wide, at each channel center point Wifi hops 11 mhz down, and 11mhz up from the center of the channel, 400 times per second.

the "unlicensed" bands, such as 900mhz, 2.4ghz, 5.8ghz are just that, unlicensed, meaning that anyone can develop any technology they want to utilize the spectrum. The FCC regulates this simply by putting parameters on the EIRP (Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power) emitted at the antenna, in 2.4ghz, not to exceed 4 watts. the presumption being that this would curtail people stomping on each other to some degree.

Most modern cordless phones use Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum, and typically do it across the entire available spectrum. BlueTooth is also a FHSS technology. While cordless phones are typically proprietary in their use of FHSS as far has hop sequences and how many times per second they change frequencies, it can be similar to BlueTooth which hops at 1600 times per second across the entire 2.4ghz range.

What does all this mean?

In order for your Wifi device to communicate it must be able to distinguish data signals from background noise (such as microwaves, cordless phones, bluetooth). The higher the "noise floor" the more signal strength you need between your wireless access point / router and your client device. When the difference between noise floor and received signal strength is not sufficient the data packet won't be seen.

Additionally, and more common, since these FHSS devices are typically hopping thru the entire sprectrum at a must faster rate then your wifi, they have a much greater chance of sending signal on the exact same frequency at the exact same time as your wireless, each signal currupting the other and causing the devices to use whatever mechanism has been designed to deal with such issues.

For Wifi, every packet sent by either side of the communication is to be acknowledged by the receiver. If no acknowledgement is received, then the sender "resends" the data packet. Potentially dramatically reducing performance.

Even phones that market them as 10 channel phones, don't really behave well in these environments, because they are typically constantly searching, probing the available channels for the "least congested" place to do business.


You could have gotten a router that when mixed with your phone could have caused issues or not. So there is no real way of knowing. But if you still have the 2.4 phone when you switch to N (or whatever will be around then) you can use it again. lol

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#10 Baltboy

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 07:04 PM

RF interference is RF interference regardless of the wireless standard being used. Using he 5Ghz range will definitely improve the NR. While N uses a 40 mhz and single or multiple bands instead of a 20 mhz single band. a single band( 1 antenna) is 150Mbps, double band(2 or 3 antenna) is 300Mbps. It also operates at the 2.4 or 5.0 Ghz range so buyer beware when purchasing the equipment that it can support the higher 5 Ghz range.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#11 Derek Ellis

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 10:34 PM

So..using a cordless phone at 5.8ghz and Wirless-N at the same time is a hit or a miss?

#12 CaveDweller2

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 03:38 AM

Don't put a cordless phone base next to the router and you should be fine. Don't set your wireless device next to a cordless phone base and you should be fine. Don't talk on the phone with it right up next to your head and you should be fine. Doing so will increase the chance of interference. These signals are in the air everywhere. Your phone signal doesn't end at your walls, neither do your neighbors. But as long as the sending and receiving devices aren't next to where these signals are the strongest(ie the bases of cordless phones) the chances of them interfering is minimized.

But just about the time you get your head around all this info it will change. So again, if what you have now works then be happy wait until it no longer works for you then worry about buying the latest greatest can't live without wireless stuff.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College





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