Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Virtual XP


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 bigguy3

bigguy3

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 12:13 PM

Can I run virtual XP on a new Dell desktop Studio 540, running Windows 7? :huh: Also, what can I expect? I'm wanting to run my old xp software and games on the new machine.

Thanks

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 12:20 PM

You should be able to. My processor doesn't have HAV (hardware assisted virtualization), so I can't run "XP Mode". However, I can just do a plain ol' virtual machine (installed off the disk). It does run pretty slow, though.

But on a new desktop, you should be able to just fine. And even if you can't do the XP Mode, you can do like I did: install XP manually (off your own disks).

Have fun!! :huh:
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#3 bigguy3

bigguy3
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 01:06 PM

you can do like I did: install XP manually (off your own disks).


Can you explain? How do I go about this?
Thanks,
Tom

#4 groovicus

groovicus

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 01:13 PM

Before you do that, just install your games and see what happens. Chances are that they will work just fine.

#5 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 03 January 2010 - 07:44 PM

Yes, it's possible that they will work. I've only found one piece of software that is completely incompatible with Windows 7. And unfortunately, it is the software that I previously used to access my wireless router settings and password (maybe AT&T will release a compatible version soon). But most things that don't work straight away will work in compatibility mode just fine.

And to answer your question:

How to Install an Operating System in Microsoft Virtual PC 2007

Notice the difference in MICROSOFT Virtual PC and the WINDOWS Virtual PC that runs XP Mode. Microsoft Virtual PC is the program that everybody can use on any OS (free from Microsoft). Windows Virtual PC is used for XP Mode exclusively for Windows 7 (it's also free). You can't install a regular OS into the Windows Virtual PC because it's only for XP Mode. When you install XP Mode, it will give you a virtual hard drive that already has XP installed on it. If you did it through Microsoft Virtual PC, you would have to install it manually from a disk or ISO image.

Like I said, my processor doesn't have HAV (run this program to see if yours does), so I can't do XP Mode. But I can install XP manually into a Microsoft Virtual PC machine. It bogs down quite a bit, though.

I'll give you a hint about installing manually: use ImgBurn (or a similar program) to create an ISO image from your install disk. Then boot the new virtual machine off of the ISO image. It's a lot faster than using the install disk (your hard drive reads a lot faster than your optical drive does).

Any other questions, just let me know. :huh:
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#6 bigguy3

bigguy3
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 04 January 2010 - 10:58 AM

Mr. KeyboardNinja, or is it just Keyboard? :huh:

Thanks a lot for your support. The first question I have is that when I go to Microsoft's virtual xp site, in step 3, I select my OS, which is home premium, and it tells me,

You are not eligible to download Windows XP Mode. You must have Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate to run Windows XP Mode. To upgrade visit Windows 7 Anytime Upgrade.


What now?
Thanks,
Tom

#7 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 04 January 2010 - 11:27 AM

Mr. KeyboardNinja, or is it just Keyboard? :huh:

ninja is fine. :inlove:


See, I told you it was exclusive....I have the Pro edition, but I don't have HAV, sooooo... :thumbup2:

You could always throw down some dough for the upgrade to Pro (then XP Mode would work), but that is your choice. Or you could just ....

Go here and download Microsoft Virtual PC.

Then follow the directions here, and install XP into a virtual machine.

Like I said in my last post, create an ISO image from your install disk, then boot the virtual machine off the ISO. Your hard disk (reading the iso) is faster than your optical drive (reading the physical disk).

The only thing about XP Mode that is better than just a plain vm is that XP Mode integrates with the host OS (Windows 7). Your programs that you would install in XP Mode show up in the Start Menu list, and can be run very easily. But running a regular vm means you have to use it inside the vm (it's just an operating system in a box). Like I said above, ou could always throw down some dough for the upgrade to Pro (then XP Mode would work), but that is your choice.

But since you have HAV, your vm will probably run a little smoother than mine do. Mine are pretty slow. Whether or not you will be able to play games....no way to know but to try it. Have you tried installing your games in Windows 7 yet? They'll likely work (they might need "Compatibility mode", though).

First, try installing your games in Windows 7. If they fail, install an XP vm in Microsoft Virtual PC. If the games run too slow in the vm, then your only options would be to do the upgrade to Pro and run XP Mode (no guarantees the graphics quality would be better, but that's what the HAV is supposed to be for, hardware assisted virtualization), or give up gaming (at least with your old games anyway). Maybe try Call of Duty - Modern Warfare 2. :huh:
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#8 bigguy3

bigguy3
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 04 January 2010 - 02:31 PM

Thanks again, ninja,

How about this ... what if I get a fresh (unformatted) SATA drive and install XP Pro on it. Theoretically I think it should work. Then I'll still have the Windows 7 re-install disk, from Dell, if I want to go back to 7. I've asked this question in another part of forums and got reasonably positive responses. Am I expecting too much?

Tom

#9 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 04 January 2010 - 10:34 PM

I'm not sure what you're asking. Could you be more specific and spell it out plainly?

If you wanted to run XP still, you could just partition off the disk that's already in there, and install XP on a separate partition (giving you a dual-boot scenario). Lots of people do this.

But I'm not sure what you're saying in that last post. Please explain... :huh:
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#10 Ingle

Ingle

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:MN
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 05 January 2010 - 10:43 AM

If you're trying to get a clean install of Windows 7 without the OEM disc, try to burn a copy from a friend or search for an ISO. Then just use the key that came with your machine, if it raises a stink it'll require you to call Microsoft, but they'll clear you within minutes of getting a hold of someone.

#11 bigguy3

bigguy3
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 05 January 2010 - 11:28 AM

Thanks to Ninja and Ingle,

Nope, what I want to do is to use XP pro, which I have a legit, unused copy of, instead of Win 7, which came on my new Dell. As Ninja suggested, I could use Virtual XP but I'd have to shell out $199 for a microsoft upgrade, since Win 7 Home came on the computer ... I really don't want to do that.

Also ...

I would rather not trash my Win 7 as I might actually want to use it later. I'm thinking of installing just XP on a blank drive and tucking the Win 7 drive away for a rainy day ... or ... I'm starting to look into a dual boot, on two separate drives. I just don't know how to do that yet. :huh:

I have a bunch of software that isn't supposed to run on Win 7 that I don't want to have to replace (cost) and every now and then I like to play "old" games.

That's it in a nutshell.

Any thoughts are certainly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tom

#12 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 05 January 2010 - 07:43 PM

Okay, the picture is a little clearer now.

You can install XP in a plain ol' virtual machine to test it out without wasting your product key. It lets you wait thirty days to activate. By then you would be able to decide whether or not to continue with the virtualization, or just go with a dual-boot. Depending on how well you like Windows 7, it would be fine for you to just use XP instead (by itself). If you set it up as a dual-boot (which you can do with 1 hard drive, it's super easy), it sounds like you won't be using Windows 7 that much anyway.

So yes, I think for now, just using XP by itself is fine. Although, even if you set up a dual-boot, it wouldn't really change things except how much space is left on the hard drive (and face it, nobody can fill them up these days!). You can set the OS to automatically boot into XP all the time, and just step in during the timeout to change it to Windows 7 if you want to use it. When you have a dual-boot, you can set a timeout before the boot to allow you to change which OS you want to boot in (I had mine set to 3 seconds). You can let it go straight to the default (after the countdown), or you can step in and manually select the other one. It's very easy. :huh:

If I were you, I would probably try the virtual XP first (installing it like I told you in previous posts). If you don't like that, you can just delete the virtual machine, and you don't have to worry about using up your XP product key (you have 30 days to activate, and it doesn't care how many times it is installed, only product keys used). Your next option would be to shrink the 7 partition, and create another one to put XP on. Then try out the dual-boot (you could wait on the product key until you decide if you like it, too). And if you didn't like that, you could just reformat the whole she-bang, and install XP by itself (and save the Windows 7 for later). Any of those options would work just fine. :huh:

Let me know what you decide to do, and I can walk you through it. :thumbup2:
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

#13 bigguy3

bigguy3
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 300 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brandon, Mississippi
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 06 January 2010 - 06:42 PM

I'm intrigued by the virtual machine and intend to look into it, but I'd like for you to lead me through a dual boot setup, if you have the time. Is it possible to create a dual boot, with Win 7 on one drive and XP on another? I know you said that it's reasonably simple on one drive and I'm not opposed to that.

Thanks, again, for the time and trouble you're taking with me. :huh:

Tom

#14 groovicus

groovicus

  • Security Colleague
  • 9,963 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centerville, SD
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 06 January 2010 - 08:52 PM

There are tons of tutorials available that will teach you how to dual boot. The process is a bit more involved than what one of our members can post in a few simple steps, and it would just be duplicating the efforts of others. Use "Dual Boot win 7 win xp" as your search term, and you should find plenty of good tutorials.

#15 keyboardNinja

keyboardNinja

    Bleepin' Ninja


  • BC Advisor
  • 4,815 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:teh interwebz
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 06 January 2010 - 09:23 PM

Here's a great link for a tutorial. Scroll down to "Method two: Windows 7 installed first"

It's really just a simple matter of shrinking the Windows 7 partition, booting off the XP install media, and installing XP on the free space you created by shrinking. Not very complicated. :huh:

As for doing it on two separate drives, this might be more involved. Using the same hard disk is the easiest and best way to do it (it's not like you'll run out of hard drive space).
PICNIC - Problem In Chair, Not In Computer

Posted Image Posted Image

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users