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Installing new hard drive


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#1 cutter

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 11:20 PM

Evening everyone...I'll apologize in advance if I am asking too vague, difficult to understand questions. I have a computer built by a friend who cant work on it anymore b/c of a recent move. I currently have a 4 gig hard drive and want to replace it with a 41.1 gig ( 40 gig? ) Hitachi Deskstar 7K80 model #HDS728040PLAT20. I am running Windows XP-Home OPS. I downloaded the quick installation guide from hitachi.com and basically understand it (I think). I know that I have to put all data on CDs to back up the info to install it on the new drive. Question #1...why is it called "backing up" if I have reinstall everything again? Question #2...What should I worry about in particular when getting ready to make this switch? Question #3...Is there any easy way to explain how to set up a "master/slave" setup? I have heard this term and understand that it has to do with having two drives but I dont know how to set it up or if it is even that important considering that I am going to be putting in such a large hard drive ( for me ) and I dont do any gaming or anything like that. Finally, once the new drive is physically in the case and hooked up, how do I go about formatting or partioning the new drive ( Cutter ducks and waits to make sure that no one throws anything at him...waiting...waiting ...) I know BIOS is involved but am not sure how to go about it. I dont know if this should have been seperated into different posts and if so I apologize but I am obviously a bit lost. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again everyone.

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#2 Snapper

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 06:27 PM

man, you don't want a question answered, you want a book written. e-mail me and i can help a bit, use my hotmail account. your best bet is to do the format on the "deathstar" oops, i mean deskstar, (bad tech joke about ibm) , slap the old drive in on the other ide chanel (pull ribbon off cd rom and put on old drive), boot up, then copy all files from old to a new folder on the deathstar. the partitionong and formatting of the new drive is easy with the winxp cd, and you don't haver to worry about backing up on cd either. need more specific, get ahold of me.
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#3 cowee

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 07:43 PM

1. There are several different backup methods that you could use that will provide you with a variety of results. A simple backup, ie copying files to a cd, is really only good for data; not for the programs that use the data. So, if you are going to go that route dont bother backing up the actual programs.

There are other programs you can use, Norton Ghost for example, that can effectively clone the old drive to the new drive without having to re-install anything.

2. In essence the only thing you really have to worry about in making the switch is making sure the data you want off the old drive is backed up properly.

3. Most drives will have a diagram on the drive itself showing jumpers you have to set that determine weither the drive will be the master o the slave drive. The jumper is a simple plastic tab that will cover two ajacent pins on the end of the drive. Some drives in addition to having a diagram on the top of the drive will also have the initials MS, for master, SL, for slave, and CS, for cable select, with can help in determining which pinset is the correct one to use for a particular drive.

Finally, as far as formatting and such goes all you should have to do is put in the drive and boot off of the windows xp cd. The windows setup process will give you an option to format the drive.

As usual, however, I probably missed several things here in my post. Feel free to ask of you have any more questions or need any more detail on the subject.

#4 Snapper

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 08:38 AM

again the simplest ans easiest way without making a "ghost" disk, playing around with jumpers, is to format and setup new hard drive, then unplug your cd rom, plug in your old hard drive, copy and paste from d: to c: in "my computer". saying this, i can think of many ways to get the same end result. but i do this everyday, what cowee forgets is you said you are a newbie to this and the simplest most effieient way for you is the above i believe, but the result will be the same either way.
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#5 Snapper

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 08:43 AM

upon reading your original question, you had a 4 gig and going to a 40 gig. is your motherboard going to see the 40 gigs? sounds like not, the older boards have a hard time seeing anything over a 20 gig, now if you cant see the whole 40 gigs, you can either check out a bios update for the motherboard or you can check with IBM on how to "clip" your hard drive. this enables old boards to see more then the 20 gigs they are able to, but it does limit your storage capacity, plug in your "new" 40 gig hard drive , then check with bios to see if it natively supports its size before you get to far ahead.
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