Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Computer restarts after reaching Windows XP loading screen..


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 334458091d

334458091d

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:53 AM

Posted 29 December 2009 - 08:38 PM

Hi, so I woke up this morning and turned on my pc and it turned on then went to a screen that said, turn on pc in: safe mode, safe mode with networking, start windows normally, etc.

So I clicked on all of them and the result was the same, It took me to the windows XP loading screen were the blue bar at the bottom would begin to load and then it would just restart, it has been doing this all day.

I have been googling this issue all day but I do not know what to do.

Originally I presumed my power supply might be at fault since it seemed to be making lots of noises the past 4 months.
I have read that faulty RAM could also be the issue, I am currently running memtest86.
I have heard of people reformatting and the problem persisted.

I just need some advice.

btw, this is posted from my other pc

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 jnk1296

jnk1296

  • Members
  • 150 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:53 AM

Posted 29 December 2009 - 08:55 PM

Not to be a messenger of doom, but i once saw a video on youtube about this exact problem. The poor guy had to replace his entire motherboard. I hope this isn't the cause of your problem, but it is a possible cause.

#3 dfv8

dfv8

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 01:11 PM

Hello.

I don't profess to be an expert, but I had a similar occurance myself when building a PC for the first time, i.e. constantly rebooting. When I did a web search, the general conclusion I came to was that it may have been a RAM problem. I was about to return the RAM to the supplier when I had a eureka moment and checked the default RAM voltages in the BIOS - they were all lower than that recommended by the RAM manufacturer.

I incrementally increased the voltages slightly from within the BIOS and retested until I had a stable boot-up - Voila! all ok. My system has been stable as a rock thus far - may I suggest you try the same?

Regards.

Edited by dfv8, 31 December 2009 - 01:14 PM.


#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,299 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 02:16 PM

I would remove the hard drive...temporarily connect it to a different system as a aecondary drive...and run chkdsk /r on the drive.

Then put it back and try to boot.

Louis

#5 rgreenlee

rgreenlee

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 07:08 PM

As a first step I recommend going into every BIOS setup
screen and applying the Default settings. Usually there
will be a Function key you press to apply the default
settings for each BIOS setup screen.

The reason is that if some freaky screw-up has occurred in
the BIOS settings then this behavior could occur without
a single thing being wrong with the hard drive or the data on it.
Visually the BIOS settings can look okay but still not be due to
some freak glitch - power spike who knows...

While I would do this first, I would especially do this if the
drive checked out okay when testing it on another system.

The experience I had that makes me do this first is from an XP laptop
that rebooted prior to the screen offering boot choices. Booting
the Windows install disk and various Microsoft technology based
Emergency Boot CD's would show no hard drive present even though
the laptop was partially booting Windows. Linux based Boot CD's would
see it though. The drive was fine on another computer (chkdsk, fun with
Partition Manager, backing up the data, reformatting, repartitioning, restoring
data, same boot behavior). After an entire day on it, having given up, I
tried resetting the BIOS settings. :D (Because with the unpartitioned
drive installed and Windows Install CD still not seeing the drive, despite
the fact that the BIOS was telling me Brand/Model of the drive on boot,
there was no place left to go.)

Edited by rgreenlee, 31 December 2009 - 08:04 PM.


#6 rrochell8

rrochell8

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 07:50 PM

I've got this same problem and I've been trying figure it out for a couple of weeks. No luck as of yet, was hoping someone would have the answer here....C'est la vie!

#7 rgreenlee

rgreenlee

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 09:10 PM

Well rrochell8, often the boot problem can be cured by manually switching to an older copy of the registry, older than the recent copy offered as "Last Known Good Configuration" on the boot menu screen. However there are things you can try to do first which are prudent to try first (and if possible for you) just in case that is not the problem.

Unfortunately the procedure used to revert to an older copy of the registry if present (usually is present even in XP Home) is typically done manually by typing commands in at a command prompt (C:>) rather than being available to do as a menu-driven process. The way to the command prompt is typically through booting into the Microsoft Recovery Console and the procedure is described in various places and can involve using different methods, but here is one place,

http://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/...95_mem1,00.html

In brief the concept is that there are five files in the registry that are the main ones in question here, and the hope is that by replacing those five files with a slightly older set of them your computer will be fixed.

The five files currently in use are at:

c:\windows\system32\config\system
c:\windows\system32\config\software
c:\windows\system32\config\sam
c:\windows\system32\config\security
c:\windows\system32\config\default

The older ones you want will hopefully be in some subfolder of the hidden System Volume Information folder in the root (C:\), sets of them having been accumulating there in a subfolder named Snapshot of numbered subfolders like RP312, RP313 etc., due to the System Restore feature occasionally creating its dated "Restore Points" but their names will begin with "_registry_machine_", so _registry_machine_system etc. So your goal will be to rename the existing 5 files and copy your pick, date wise, of an older set of the five files into their place minus the "_registry_machine_" part of the saved filenames. Then if all goes well you'll simply reboot and your computer will be fixed.

Now Microsoft, bless their hearts, hasn't provided a menu driven way of doing this straightforward chore when your computer won't boot. When your computer is working and you have the Pro version of XP, the Home version too these days I guess but originally I recall it (calendar etc.) not being in Home as it was a selling point for paying more to own Pro (can't ever bless their hearts too much), then via System Restore you can pick from the saved Restore Points (which are saved in subfolders with names like RP312, RP313 etc.) via a Calendar in the System Restore feature. I mention this because there may be a simpler way to get to that Calendar without having to fiddle with the System Volume Information folder. When XP is first installed there can be a set of the original five registry files saved in a folder named C:\Windows\repair which you could use just to get up enough so as to get into the System Restore feature and use the Calendar. On some computers though the repair folder might be empty. (I mentioned that there are different methods of doing it all manually and I believe in Microsoft's own method they first go to those files and boot with them along the way to getting at the files saved in the System Volume Information folder.)

Edited by rgreenlee, 31 December 2009 - 10:17 PM.


#8 rrochell8

rrochell8

  • Members
  • 49 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:53 AM

Posted 31 December 2009 - 10:14 PM

I didn't mention this, but my cd-rom does not seem to be working on my old dell and for some reason my dvd burner and cd-rom is not working on my new dell tower either. I got a vicious virus on my newer dell and when I got cleaned up, neither drive worked any longer. The device manager says that everything is working properly. Just seems somewhat strange that three drives went down around the same time. The old dell is the one that won't boot. So using any type of recovery disc is out. I tried making a floppy boot disk at my brother in laws house, but it didn't like the boot.ini file that I used, so that doesn't seem to work either. I'm in a quandry here...what to do?

#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,299 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:02:53 AM

Posted 03 January 2010 - 05:17 PM

From a PM to me by the OP:

Hey.

My restarting problem is fixed.

This is how it worked out for me.

I put my harddrive into my bros pc and booted up the pc from his Hard drive. As the pc booted up it chkdsk on my hard drive. it ended up cleaning and deleting corrupt files on my hdd and now it works perfectly.

Cheers.


Louis




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users