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netbook security questions


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#1 bryan123456789

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 12:35 PM

hi all. happy holidays. i just got a new acer netbook for xmas. i was wondering what security software i need for it? i didnt open the box for netbook yet (i am on my crappy desktop and i open my netbook later) but my mom got me norton 360. what else and what other programs do you guys recommend? i have the os windows 7 starter.

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#2 keyboardNinja

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:16 PM

MalwareByte's Anti-Malware
Ad-Aware
SuperAntispyware
SpyBot Search and Destroy

These are all good free anti-malware addons. Just don't run another real-time protection software with the Norton. It is okay to have multiple on-demand scanners available, but having more than one real-time protection going can cause major problems.

Personally, I wouldn't use Norton, but that's just me. I'd find something that's a little less of a resource hog.

Also, download the latest version of Firefox for all your internet browsing.

CCleaner is a good app for cleaning junk out.

If you don't already know about the Starter version, some things are limited. For example, Windows will not let you change the background. You can use third-party software to do it, but I have not done it myself. I'm running Professional, so I don't know all that is different, but you will probably notice some things. But with a netbook, about all you'll be doing is surfing the internet, anyway. The lack of customization of the OS won't bug you too much.

Enjoy!
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#3 Romeo29

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 05:50 PM

In my opinion, if you got Norton 360, then it provides all kinds of protection. You need not worry about anymore products.
As suggested, you can use Firefox and keep your Windows and Norton updated.

#4 Jacee

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 06:31 PM

Spyware Guard and Spyware Blaster are a "must have" combination! Both are free http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/
When you update SpywareBlaster, be sure to click on "enable all protection". Also, be sure to update (or look for updates) it often.

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#5 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 02:20 AM

I too dislike Norton. Anytime you use a single package to try and safeguard your machine you're asking for problems. AKA putting all of your eggs in one basket.

Nod32
AVG
Avast

Are a few of the AV's I choose to use the most. I then layer them with other programs (some already mentioned). In the event of a penetration, I have backup utilities already loaded and ready to go.

#6 bryan123456789

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 08:57 AM

well i uninstalled norton 360 cause it was too heavy on the system and its resources... (i used norton removal thingy) i installed avast and windows security essentials. i have firefox and been using ff on all my computer for a year.

#7 Romeo29

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 02:05 PM

well i uninstalled norton 360 cause it was too heavy on the system and its resources... (i used norton removal thingy) i installed avast and windows security essentials. i have firefox and been using ff on all my computer for a year.


Yes that may be a problem for Netbooks. Netbooks do not have so many resources as to run a heavy duty antivirus product like Norton 360.
Now all antivirus vendors offer special light-weight antivirus and internet security for netbooks that do not go heavy on resources.

But yes you may want a lightweight antivirus like avast!. But why Windows Security Essentials too? You should not install more than one security products. Doing this may actually slow down your netbook.

#8 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 02:34 PM

I partially agree with Romeo. Also if you notice the Windows Security products rarely if ever (never that I've seen) ever capture anything.

Avast, Malwarebytes, SuperAntiSpyware and Ccleaner along with a good defragmentation program should pretty much cover you.

#9 xblindx

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 03:36 PM

Also if you notice the Windows Security products rarely if ever (never that I've seen) ever capture anything.

Actually, that isn't true at all with Windows Security Essentials. Review #1 Review 2
Many other reviews

Edited by xblindx, 03 January 2010 - 03:38 PM.


#10 keyboardNinja

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 08:26 PM

I'm skeptical of Microsoft's security products, as well. The reviews seem promising, but I'm going to install MSE on my virtual machines to test it out first.

Yeah, I agree with Romeo. Norton is too chunky for netbooks. Use something lighter. :thumbsup:
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#11 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 10:24 PM

While the reviews may be promising X, I work in a computer tech store and have seen many systems come in with various types of infections that Windows Security Essentials didn't even touch, let alone even recognize. Ransomware and Rootkits seem to have easier access to Windows 7 (32) especially.
And removal? Kinda tough to remove what isn't recognized isn't it?
Personally I like Windows 7 VERY MUCH, but this is an actual issue.

I too gave WSE a chance until I wound up with a few infections of my own just to test it out. Various Windows 32.gen infections as well as a few cases of ransomeware (Malware Defense, Windows Police Pro 2010) which were removed with some other products.

#12 keyboardNinja

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 12:39 AM

I knew I had a good reason to be skeptical... :thumbsup:

That's why I was going to test it on my vm's first. :flowers:

The reviews sound good, but the real world testing always tells the truth...

Like I've said before, you can't just use one scanner anyway. Use ONE active protection (paid or not) and multiple free on-demand scanners.
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#13 xblindx

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 03:28 PM

I've never used it, so I was just basing it off of reviews, and from what I've read around the internet. I have seen some bad reviews, but most of them are promising. And just a piece of info, rootkits aren't detected completely by quite a few AV programs since they are so well hidden.

#14 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 09:51 PM

Yes X you're correct, but the big difference is that MS was touting this again as the end all to be all (at least in October 09) just like we saw back in 1998 ala Windows Defender, which it never lived up to. I did notice though that as quick as the accolades came out they stopped almost as quickly. Many of the reviews are still available but the newer postings have slowed down considerably.
Part of what I read in at least a few reviews was that it was "very good" at detecting rootkits and many of the "newer" types of infections. It did specifically mention rootkits and I distinctly remember that part since it's what I've been dealing with a lot lately (customers systems).
When any manufacturer starts touting specifics in there AV capture and removal programs I expect there to be at least a few teeth in what they're saying.

As you very correctly stated though very few (if any) AV programs are truly ANY good at actually detecting OR removing rootkits.
I've noticed this even more so with the 64 bit OS's as there seems to be nothing that's even remotely reliable yet. The number of occurances in Windows 7 products is also much higher than in XP. Vista seems to be lesser so than Win 7 but higher than XP. Why, I don't know.

So far the only thing reliable seems to be another managed rootkit. Odd.

The reason I mention this is because of the painstaking effort it takes to detect rootkits and then be able to remove them.

I also believe that the current flavors of ransomware are simply precursors or semi-practice scripts for even more devient rootkit type programs in the future?

If MS or anyone else comes out with something that lives up to it's advertising I'll be the first to sing it's praises but for now it's a very narrow market that ultimately seems to preys on less informed consumers willing to trust one-click AV programs.




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