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Need some knowledge about over clocking


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#1 Surma

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 09:22 AM

Okay, pretty soon i will get my hands on a "new" computer, a few years old, running windows xp, i dont know many details. I do know that its as limited as a computer can possibly get, and its not very used either. Im not exactly in the mood to spend lots of money getting additional memory and video cards to make it work for gaming, so i was thinking of this over clocking stuff i heard somewhere. As i understand it, my knowledge coming from wikipedia and an article about over clocking a TI Graph calculator, it seems like a rather simple process, just replace a component next to the processor and its done.

So, say i want to double the speed, how do i know which component it is, what to replace with, if i need much more cooling, that sort of stuff. And like i said, i dont know any technical specifications yet. Maybe sometime in January i will know.


EDIT: Moved to a more appropriate forum

Edited by garmanma, 21 December 2009 - 10:19 PM.

---My computer---
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#2 ReviverSoft

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 06:29 PM

First thing you need to know is that overclocking PC components doesn't increase your PC's performance by a huge margin.

Secondly, components can be overclocked as long as the hardware they depends on, supports the same.

Third, components like the processor need additional (more effective) cooling after being overclocked.

Overclocking enthusiasts, specifically buy hardware that can be overclocked as opposed to taking any generic system and trying to overclock it for performance gains.

So, if you are not able to overclock the existing pc's components, you'll have to upgrade them or consider getting newer hardware.

Edited by ReviverSoft, 21 December 2009 - 06:32 PM.

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#3 the_patriot11

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 12:14 AM

overclocking, even in a system designed for it, will shorten the systems life span. (Doesn't bother most enthusiasts theyre buying new systems every year anyway) and like reviver said, if you have a system like a prebuilt or equipment not designed for it, overclocking can damage the hardware. even an improper overclock on a well designed system will fry a lot of stuff. I do not recomend it, if you need more power, I always recomend to my customers to save money, and purchase a new system or upgrade the system they have to run the software they need at stock speeds. I also recomend a person when they buy a new computer to purchase a bit more powerful of a computer that they need so that it lasts longer.

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#4 Surma

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 05:35 AM

Thanks for the info.
So, the only real way of boosting a pc is investing in new hardware.
---My computer---
Manufacturer:HP Pavilion 061 CPU:Intel Pentium 4 640, 3200 MHz (16 x 200) RAM: 1024MB Motherboard:Asus PTGD1-LA Chipset:Intel Grantsdale i915P HDD:Main256GB Ext512GB Video:Radeon X600 Series Internet:DSL 2mb/s OS:Windows XP Home Edition SP3 Firefox+IExplorer AVG Internet Security

#5 dpunisher

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:02 AM

So, the only real way of boosting a pc is investing in new hardware.


No.

Overclocking will not harm component life as long as you keep heat and voltage to "reasonable" limits. Why would my CPU have a shorter lifespan overclocked when it runs cooler than stock, and my voltage is inside the manufacturer's specs? Look at manufacturer's CPU lineups. There is usually a trend between speed and voltage. You have one CPU running at 2.66ghz and 1.15V, and another running 3.0ghz at 1.25V. Why not bump voltage and take a shot at the higher speed?

Not all systems overclock. Most OEM systems/prebuilts don't have the BIOS options (multiplier/FSB/voltage options) to do the job. Most prebuilts are not designed for overclocking, and that is absolute truth. OEMs cut every corner possible to make a buck.

Last point, overclocking a CPU is pointless on most OEMs as the performance limitations are most often slow hard drives, insufficient memory, a slug of a videocard, and generally a cluttered Windows install. CPU speed is the least of the problems for most OEMs.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#6 ReviverSoft

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 01:13 PM

So assuming you have understood the feasibility rather possibility of overclocking, mentioned below are your options:

A. Upgrade existing PC components.

OR

B. Invest in a new system (that can be upgraded or overclocked with ease)
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#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:56 AM

So, the only real way of boosting a pc is investing in new hardware.


No.

Overclocking will not harm component life as long as you keep heat and voltage to "reasonable" limits. Why would my CPU have a shorter lifespan overclocked when it runs cooler than stock, and my voltage is inside the manufacturer's specs? Look at manufacturer's CPU lineups. There is usually a trend between speed and voltage. You have one CPU running at 2.66ghz and 1.15V, and another running 3.0ghz at 1.25V. Why not bump voltage and take a shot at the higher speed?

Not all systems overclock. Most OEM systems/prebuilts don't have the BIOS options (multiplier/FSB/voltage options) to do the job. Most prebuilts are not designed for overclocking, and that is absolute truth. OEMs cut every corner possible to make a buck.

Last point, overclocking a CPU is pointless on most OEMs as the performance limitations are most often slow hard drives, insufficient memory, a slug of a videocard, and generally a cluttered Windows install. CPU speed is the least of the problems for most OEMs.


first, because most OCed systems DONT run cooler then they would at stock, unless their liquid cooled. second, believe it or not, if the processor was not designed to run at the higher frequency, whether its running hotter or not, the higher frequency is harder on the processor then running stock. your basically making it work harder then it was designed to, cool or not. That being said, thats not to say that it will cause the CPU to die within 6 months, ive seen a properly overclocked CPU run for 2+ years, especially if its a good quality CPU on a good motherboard. however, that same CPU on that same motherboard, will last longer. In fact in my experience, overclocked or not, the motherboard usually fails long before the CPU does.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#8 DaffyKantReed

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 04:23 AM

overclocking, even in a system designed for it, will shorten the systems life span.


I disagree. When the Celeron 300A, Intel Northwood 1.6GHz and the XP 2500+ Barton were common, I overclocked pretty much every PC that I could get my hands on. Overclocks ranged from 25-50%, on air mostly. In most cases it was a matter of raising Vcore by 50 or 100mV, and changing the multiplier or FSB. Never have I seen a piece of hardware fail because of overclocking, though anecdotal reports suggest heavy overvolting may lessen the life expectancy of processors, which makes perfect sense. Of course the PCI/AGP PLL divider was a boon for overclocking.

#9 ReviverSoft

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:32 PM

Let's not forget the fact that manufacturers don't recommend overclocking their products(for a purpose), instead leave the decision to the customer.
However, in recent times, some manufacturer's actually sell factory overclocked products like gfx cards and products that support overclocking, specifically catering to enthusiasts.

For Eg.: Why do we have a 2Ghz and a 2.1Ghz processor being sold separately, when they could just put up the 2Ghz processor for sale and tell them to overclock it to attain 2.1Ghz? One thing is marketing, the other being the fact that it has been factory clocked to 2.1Ghz to provide full stability at stock conditions, for most users.

Hope this makes sense. :thumbsup:

Edited by ReviverSoft, 23 December 2009 - 01:32 PM.

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#10 dpunisher

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 05:23 PM

first, because most OCed systems DONT run cooler then they would at stock, unless their liquid cooled. second, believe it or not, if the processor was not designed to run at the higher frequency, whether its running hotter or not, the higher frequency is harder on the processor then running stock. your basically making it work harder then it was designed to, cool or not. That being said, thats not to say that it will cause the CPU to die within 6 months, ive seen a properly overclocked CPU run for 2+ years, especially if its a good quality CPU on a good motherboard. however, that same CPU on that same motherboard, will last longer. In fact in my experience, overclocked or not, the motherboard usually fails long before the CPU does.


I dare you to compare temps between a stock i7 920/stock cooler and my i7 920 at 3.5 with a Mugen II. I can guarantee it is cooler than a stock 920.

I still have a Barton on a POS ECS board I overclocked to 2.2 that is running fine (dedicated download machine). As long as voltage and temp requirements are not exceeeded what is the harm? I have had overclocked systems for over a decade (including that Celeron 300A at 450) on a BX6-2. Sold the board with a Coppermine 700 long ago to a family member, and it is still running strong.

Never lost a CPU, never lost a motherboard. So what if life is a little hard on an overclocked CPU. It will be long since upgraded/stuck in a landfill by the time any electromigration isuues become apparent.

EDIT: As to ReviverSoft's post............right on. The same chips (bin speed) can be marked with whatever the channel needs. Just cause your cheap CPU is marked at a certain speed, doesn't mean it was binned at that low a speed.

Edited by dpunisher, 23 December 2009 - 05:28 PM.

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#11 the_patriot11

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 03:53 AM

overclocking, even in a system designed for it, will shorten the systems life span.


I disagree. When the Celeron 300A, Intel Northwood 1.6GHz and the XP 2500+ Barton were common, I overclocked pretty much every PC that I could get my hands on. Overclocks ranged from 25-50%, on air mostly. In most cases it was a matter of raising Vcore by 50 or 100mV, and changing the multiplier or FSB. Never have I seen a piece of hardware fail because of overclocking, though anecdotal reports suggest heavy overvolting may lessen the life expectancy of processors, which makes perfect sense. Of course the PCI/AGP PLL divider was a boon for overclocking.


doesnt mean that they haven't. Tell me, have you taken 2 identical computers, overclocked one and not the other and left them on till they failed? now im not saying if you overclock it its bound to fail in 6 months. Especially with CPUs it could take years even overclocked. Im not against overclocking in the least bit, I just want to point out 2 things. First, it is harder on equipment. Second, when done properly it still lasts a good lifetime, and third, most overclocking enthusiasts replace their hardware long before it dies anyway so first 2 points are moot. And I said most overclocks, not all to those of you freaking out on me. with a good aftermarket cooler and good airflow allow for cooler temps, the CPU still wasn't designed to run at faster then stock speeds which tends to add wear and tear to it. But if you notice point 3 thats a moot point. :D

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Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#12 rayj0054

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 07:39 AM

what everyone is telling you is overclocking requires at least some knowledge in the way a computer gets info from point a to point b. i would not suggest it until you have some experience at least research on o/c forums. or have access to more components just in case

#13 the_patriot11

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 02:30 AM

what I normally recomend in the case of overclocking is to do a lot of research, and don't learn on your primary computer. find a junker somewhere or do a cheap (extremely cheap) build, and experiment on that until you get the hang of it. that way, if you fry something, your not really losing anything. Im not against learning new thngs, but if you learn on your primary system and mess up you just lost only you know what. :D

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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