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Advice Needed :)


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8 replies to this topic

#1 buffalo_bill

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 06:45 AM

hey guys

I'm thinking about running two OS on my pc. I'm already running windows xp Home SP3, but I want to look into having the option of booting windows 7 also.
Does anyone know of the memory needed, tools needed, and whether its worth it?

Thanks :thumbsup:

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#2 OldGrumpyBastard

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 07:12 AM

You need a minumum of 2gb RAM. There are other system requirements...I suggest that you read this article from the Windows 7 capability center and at the very least run the free scan...As for dual booting 7 with XP...You'll love it...It's really crisp and clean...

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/compatibi.../en-us/faq.aspx

Edited by OldGrumpyBastard, 21 December 2009 - 07:12 AM.

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#3 hamluis

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 11:07 AM

<<...tools needed, and whether its worth it?>>

I don't know of any "tools needed" for any install of any Windows O/S.

As to "whether its worth it", I guess I don't know how to determine that. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

But...I think it's rather silly to pretend that XP cannot be improved upon, just as XP was a great improvement over Windows 9x O/Ses. For anyone to fall in love with a computer operating system...IMO, defies understanding the nature of change in what we call "the universe."

I think Win 7 is an improvement, but...whether it is or not...it is likely to be the prime O/S that is used by Windows users...for some time.

Louis

#4 rhino1366

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 12:37 PM

Windows XP Home is "OK"... but, Windows XP Pro is good.
Windows 7 is just an enhanced Windows Vista... or no? :flowers: Actually, Windows 7 is the latest research, must be good. But it's also another way to keep our money... lol. ^_^

About Tools: Ashampoo, iolo, TuneUp, Auslogics (will be updated soon)... choose from these, they're fine. :thumbsup:


Hope I've helped.
rhino1366

#5 hamluis

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 01:30 PM

If money is an important consideration for using an O/S...then I think a few calculations are in order.

A user paying the maximum price for Win 7 will probably pay $120 or so, while upgrade editions can be had for as little as $56 per license.

If you divide that by a reasonable expected "lifetime" of use (3 years, min)...that's about $120 divided by 1,095 days, slightly over 10 cents a day for the right to use Microsoft's product.

If Win 7 is used as long as XP has been used (8 years)...the full cost of the license should be divided by 2,920 days. You do the math on this one.

My approach is...I have paid more for programs which I don't use nearly as much...to even logically reflect on the cost of the ease of use which drives me to using Windows.

And then...there are the linux-based operating systems for those who think that they are paying Microsoft too much to enjoy the fruits of their efforts.

Since the O/S facilitates the use of a computer for anything...it is far more important than any 3 or 4 programs which a user may pay for gladly. I try to keep that in mind.

Louis

#6 Ken-in-West-Seattle

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 08:49 PM

Each OS has its strengths and weaknesses. And for some of us, personal preference makes a difference. I use every os that works on Intel processors at the moment.
Most of my computers use xp pro but special purpose systems use linux, bsd or osx. I have one vista install and one win7 install since I need to learn how to talk people through various issues on each os.

The main complaint I have with the newer windows OS's is that more and more of the complexity is being hidden from the user. Some may not think that is a bad thing, but that way lies the need to reinstall every time something gets buggered. Might as well have a Mac.

The idea that "lack of choices" equals "ease of use" has continued to infest microsoft products to the point where while almost anyone can use a computer, almost no one can fix or maintain them without tedious workarounds and dealing with massive code bloat and object oriented obfuscation. The time involved in doing the simplest repairs can make professional help too expensive to consider. The phishers and malware and zombie gangs are winning it seems as well as hardware makers with their proprietary driver forced obsolescence.

#7 buffalo_bill

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 02:27 AM

Thanks for all the different responses guys :thumbsup:

I was also wondering if anyone could provide a link with a tutorial that will help me with doing the whole "partition" and stuff?

thanks

#8 OldGrumpyBastard

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:25 AM

The easiest way is during your new installation is to let set-up do it for you...The only things you have to worry about are the amount of partitions, size of each, and which one your O/S is installed on. Once your installation is complete it is fairly easy to change every partition but the one your O/S is installed upon so care should be used in sizing that partition correctly for your needs initially.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/partition-and-format-a-disk-in-windows/
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/understanding-hard-disk-partitions/
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/resizing-adding-partitions-with-gparted-live/

Here are a few that may give you an idea of what you may need.
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#9 Guest_Abacus 7_*

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:15 AM

:flowers:

Little Point?

ALWAYS have the oldest Version of Windows on C:Drive, Mate.

It will then always give you the Option on Start Up to Boot into either OS then, unless other problems.

:thumbsup:




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