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Upgrading Grapihcs Card


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Jmoss1994

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 05:28 PM

I have a 350Watt power supply and need a good graphics card (at least a 512mb) that's a PCI.

3 quick questions though.
Is there any decent graphics card that's a 512MB that's around $50?
Will I have to upgrade my power supply?
Can I hook up any graphics card to my motherboard or will it not except certain types? (its a ECS P4VMM2)

Was looking at this one but will hopefully ordering it online.
And if I have to order a new Power supply I was looking at this
Any help would be much appreciated :D

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 05:44 PM

I'm assuming this is your motherboard.

This depends on which graphics card you want and what you plan on doing with it. Almost certainly, if you want a recent generation of graphics card, you will need a new power supply. According to ECS, your motherboard takes an Intel Pentium 4 CPU and has a 4X AGP slot. You can use a standard PCI or AGP graphics card but not a PCI Express card. The GIGABYTE GV-R465D2-1GI Radeon HD 4650 1GB 128-bit GDDR2 AGP 8X HDCP Ready Video Card is more expensive, even after the mail in rebate, but is newer and uses AGP. You will need a good power supply for it, and the one you selected isn't that good. The CORSAIR CMPSU-450VX 450W is by a very good company and will work nicely.

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#3 Jmoss1994

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 01:40 PM

Motherboard is probably this(Says 1.0 on the sticker).
Wasn't really looking for a top of the line, just something to were I can play a game like The Guild 2 or TF2 without it skipping or going super slow.

Looking at around $100 dollars to spend on both the graphics card and power supply.
Also my dad was wondering how you can figure out the power supply needed for the computer.

#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 04:37 PM

That motherboard also has an AGP port. AGP is better than standard PCI, so I would go for that. The combined cost for those components are $149, $129 after rebates. I chose the Radeon 4650 because is it powerful and is one of the few cards for AGP with specifications and reviews that are decent. The Radeon 4650 is a mainstream card from last generation, so it isn't cutting edge or high performance. To run that graphics card, you need a 400W PSU. On a new system, I usually suggest going for a power supply that is 100W over the recommended wattage for the graphics card. However, due to budget considerations, I used 50W over for this build. If you want to save money with the power supply, I guess we could go for one from a less well-known brand, but you would still probably be above the $100 mark. If you want to do that, you can get the Antec Basiq BP500U 500W. I've had problems with Antec, but they aren't bad. You could also get the SAPPHIRE 100258L Radeon HD 3650 512MB 128-bit GDDR2 AGP 4X/8X HDCP Ready Video Card. That card is from the Radeon 3 series (Radeon 5 is the most recent generation), it is older and not as powerful as the 4650. But it does cost the same as the 4650 after rebates. It's also possible that your CPU cannot handle the processing of those games or you need more RAM. What is your CPU model and speed? How much RAM do you have?

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#5 Jmoss1994

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 09:32 AM

My processor is a Intel Pentium 2.0 Ghz and I have 1.21 Gigs of Ram. For the most part the computer is fine, but the guy who made it put in a 16mb graphics card.

Would the cheaper power supply run the GIGABYTE GV-R465D2-1GI Radeon HD 4650 1GB 128-bit GDDR2 AGP 8X HDCP Ready Video Card?
(Can you tell me how to find the power supply I need for future upgrades?)

#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 01:04 PM

The power supply in my above post, the Antec Basiq, should be able to run the 4650 fine. Double check to make sure your motherboard matches the one you linked to. The motherboard above as an AGP slot in it, but I want to make absolutely sure before you run off and get an AGP card. For reference, using the link you posted, the AGP slot is the brown one just above the white PCI slots at the bottom of the picture. I usually find the best wattage by taking the amount a graphics card needs and adding 100W onto it. The extra 100W is there for future upgrades, overclocking, and aging.

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#7 Jmoss1994

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 06:39 PM

I always wondered what the brown slot was for :D
Cool, think were going to go with the 4650 and the Antec Basiq, but still have to discuss it with my Dad. I was also thinking about overclocking my processor but I read somewhere that it isn't a good idea to overclock a Pentium processor, is it true?

#8 DJBPace07

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 12:30 AM

You can certainly overclock your Pentium CPU, but it usually isn't suggested unless you have an aftermarket cooler. Overclocking is best performed from within your computer's BIOS however, some manufacturers lock the BIOS to prevent you from easily overclocking your CPU. If you later decide to build or buy a new computer, an AMD Black Edition or an Intel Extreme CPU come with their multipliers unlocked, making the overclocking process very easy. CPU's that aren't in these product lines have their multipliers locked and thus require more work. Do use caution if you try to overclock your CPU, it is possible to permanently damage the computer doing it.

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