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Desktop Keeps Shutting Down On Its Own


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#1 darthdusty

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 10:45 AM

I am trying to fix a computer for my girlfriend's mother so she can have a family computer in her living room so her family will stay off of hers, but that's beside the point. Anyway, the computer I am trying to fix is a Dell desktop, not completely sure the model of it at the moment (although if it is required I can find out). When trying to start the computer up, it used to say disk read error: 0 or something to that degree. I shut off all of the disk drives in the system setup and what do you know the computer started right up into Windows Vista. However, it randomly shuts off (it was doing this from the beginning before I could get it to boot into Vista). I have since deleted the partition and am trying to install Vista from scratch like I was intending to do, however I cannot complete the installation before it turns off during the installation process. Any suggestions? My thought is it is an overheating issue, but it could be something so simple to fix that I have been overlooking it.

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 11:02 AM

could be a number of things actually. I would take the side cover off and check all the capacitors on the motherboard to make sure their not damaged, leaking or bulging. If its not that then its either a PSU or overheating issue, if I were to bet. Have the PSU tested (or swap it out with another if available) to see if thats the issue, and perhaps it wouldnt hurt to try installing vista with the side panel off and a fan blowing into it to see if that does anything. but I would definetly switch out PSUs first if you have one available, that would be the best possibility in my mind right now.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 darthdusty

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 11:08 AM

The side panel has been off and that doesn't seem to make it run any better. Everything looks tip top, nothing damaged or anything like that. It may very well be a PSU problem, I've figured it had been overheating but you may be on to something. I'll tell you this: it will start shutting down quicker and quicker as I turn it back on. For instance, first time I turned it on it shut down within three minutes, then two and so on. I booted into Vista somehow and it stayed on for 10 minutes, then fifteen minutes. As soon as I deleted the partition to Vista after I backed up some important files somebody wanted, when I tried installing Vista again it would shut off in the middle of installation. However if I kept it hanging on the screen where it says no OS it will stay there for a long time. This is why I thought it was an overheating issue because the more activity the faster it shuts down (except the computer staying on the longest when it is booted into Vista and copying 3 gb's of files to an external hard drive is really weird). I want to hear what you think though; what does it sound like to you?

#4 rigacci

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 04:29 PM

Actually when you take the side panel off on some boxes they will run hotter. The enclosed box forces the air to go where it should to give it the best cooling.

Certain Dells are famous for overheating. If this one has a large green cowl over the CPU, check out what is under it. Make sure the heatsink is installed properly as they don't use really great tiedowns. Is there any silver heatsink paste under it? (if you take the heatsink off, you need to replace the paste.)

The cowl should also have a fan in it. Make sure it is clean and spinning at a decent RPM. You should feel the air blowing on your hand.

If you are taking the side off, place a decent size fan next to it and direct the cooling at the CPU. That should help with cooling a little. See how that works.


Good luck.

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#5 rowal5555

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 04:42 PM

I had reasonably new laptop which shut down randomly recently. I ran SIW (System Information for Windows) by Gabriel Topala and that said that CPU and GPU temps were getting up near 100 degrees C.

I had the heat paste replaced and the fan cleaned out and temps dropped by about 50% - no more problem.

Worth checking.

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#6 darthdusty

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 10:04 PM

Just wanted to tell you guys what I have tried today. I hooked up a an IDE bard drive using a IDE to SATA converter I have to the PC. It booted no problem, however would not go into the OS and instead went to blue screen. Did not get a chance to test out another PSU as I do not have another available. I tried installing Vista onto the hard drive as it is not installed and again no such luck; shut down. I even put a fan from my bedroom onto the exposed case on high to get some air blowing into the PC but again, no change. The PC now turns off even when it is idle on the cNnot find os screen and is now turning itself on when the PC is shut off. Have no idea what is up with it now. I would like to note that the inside feels pretty hot, but
the fan is blowing just not very fast.

#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 12:46 AM

I kinda doubt its the hard drive, and in my experience, those sata to IDE adaptors rarely work so it wouldnt be a good test anyway. there is a method of manually testing the PSU but im not sure the particulars im going to have to look it up. do you have any thermal compound? if so, you can try removing the heatsink, removing the old compound (use a damp cloth, not soaking, make sure you remove the CPU first so you dont risk getting any water or compound on the motherboard) and reapply a thin layer of paste over the die, no more then say a small piece of rice when you put it on and spread it evenly over the entire die. Not going to garentee it will work, but like rigacci said, dell laptops dont use the best tie downs, and manufacturers are NOTORIOUS for using to much paste. if the tie down became loose it could cause the issue your having.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#8 darthdusty

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 12:46 AM

Just wanted to give an update on the PC situation, maybe somebody will have something for me to try I have yet to try. I have finally succeeded in installing Vista on the PC; by some sort of miracle the computer never restarted itself during the 15th time of trying to reinstall it. I installed Speedfan to see what that might do but the PC still restarts itself. Now it is turning itself on even when the PC is shut off. Any ideas on how I might be able to fix this now that Vista is installed? I'm 99.9% convinced it has to be a hardware problem, but maybe something can be done within the OS to fix the restarts. Any suggestions?

#9 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 03:14 AM

Did you take off the heatsink, clean off the old paste and reapply the old stuff? if it is overheating, that is the most likely culprit. High end video cards can overheat a system like that to, but Im guessing you don't have one of those. However, the fact that its starting by itself sounds like the problem is a short. First check the where the wires from the power button connects to the motherboard and all the wires to the switch and the switch itself, check for bare wires and scorch marks. If everything appears fine, then the problem is most likely your PSU.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#10 darthdusty

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 01:11 PM

Definitely am wanting to try the heatsink trick but have yet to purchase any paste; probably going to have to order it online, if you know of a good type of paste to get let me know and I will get some today. I will check the wires to see if it is a short. If it turns out to be a short what would you suggest to be the best course of action in fixing it?

#11 ThunderZ

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 01:27 PM

Regarding the thermal paste, almost any paste is better then reusing the old and is sure better then not using any. I, and seem`s many prefer Artic Silver.

#12 darthdusty

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 01:39 PM

I'm glad you told me the name because it made me remember that I may have some Artic Silver lying around from when I fixed a RROD error on my friend's Xbox 360 a long time ago. I'll check and see if it's still here somewhere, if it is I'll give it a shot and tell you guys what happens.

#13 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 02:09 PM

I use Arctic silver, though Ive heard OCZ freeze is pretty good. as far as a shorts concerned if its in the PSU or the motherboard you will probably have to replace the part thats shorted (either the PSU or the motherboard) unless you know the layout and how to soder really good. If its in the wires, some electric tape works miracles.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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