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Comp won't even boot to bios


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#1 Wartrace

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 12:06 PM

My computer has been progressively getting worse until it reached the point that it will not even boot to the bios. It started about a week ago when I would have to reboot it once or twice each time to get it started. It would hang up on the bios splash screen or go to post bios screen where I would have to hit F1 to continue. The second to last time I booted it I got a BSOD which I failed to write down what it said. I rebooted & it wanted to start windows in safe mode. Now it will not even boot to the bios splash screen. It has power; all the fans are working fine. Any ideas?

My specs;
Asus P5n-72 M/B q6600 chip
4 gigs of ram
Windows vista ultimate 64 bit
Dual 8800 ultra video cards running in SLI

This is what I have tried so far;
Tried each stick of ram individually.
Tried each video card individually in different slots.
Reset the bios & removed the battery.
Unplugged everything but one video card & the main hard drive.
Reseated all the power connectors- inspected everything for damage.

Any ideas as to what the problem is? I have flashed the bios in the past (more than a year ago) using a non o/s method. I donít think this is a result of the flash. The motherboard/case does not have an onboard speaker to check the beeps.

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 03:32 PM

have you checked the capacitors? my guess is you got either a leaking/damaged capacitor, or a failing PSU.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 Wartrace

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 06:53 PM

have you checked the capacitors? my guess is you got either a leaking/damaged capacitor, or a failing PSU.


I inspected the motherboard and everything looks OK. Is it worth it to buy a power supply tester? I have seen them under 20 dollars on line.

#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 12:03 AM

Power supply testers are handy to have around but you can use a voltohmmeter just the same.
The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test a ATX PSU. Some manufacturers Like Dell have used some non ATX PSUs which have a different pinout for the 20/4 pin connector, please confirm that your PSU is a ATX type before using this procedure.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

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#5 Wartrace

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 01:57 PM

I guess I am going to try the meter route, after reading the directions it doesn't seem as difficult as I thought. Also, reading the reviews of the testers, they won't tell you if you have the correct voltage.

Thanks for taking the time to help me Sneakycyber & the_patriot09, I really appreciate it as these computer issues can be very frustrating.




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