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Max ++


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#1 Paralus

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 07:40 PM

Hi All. The PC has attracted the unwanted attentions of a MAAX ++ rootkit. Unhackme has unearthed it and cannot remove it. Malawarebytes - in what seems is the normal go - is disabled.

I've attached the Win32Ddiag report which confirms the malingerer. How does one terminate the bugger???!!!

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#2 garmanma

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 08:35 PM

As extremeboy mentioned, you need to create a DDS log and a Root Repeal log, following the instructions in our Preparation Guide
You can also attach the win32diag log


=======================================


Please read the pinned topic titled "Preparation Guide For Use Before Posting A Hijackthis Log". If you cannot complete a step, then skip it and continue with the next. In Step 6 there are instructions for downloading and running DDS which will create a Pseudo HJT Report as part of its log.

You will also be instructed to create a Root Repeal Log

When you have done that, post your log in the HijackThis Logs and Malware Removal forum, NOT here, for assistance by the HJT Team Experts. A member of the Team will walk you through, step by step, on how to clean your computer. If you post your log back in this thread, the response from the HJT Team will be delayed because your post will have to be moved. This means it will fall in line behind any others posted that same day.

The HJT team is very busy and it will take awhile to get to your post
Please be patient and good luck

Edited by garmanma, 04 December 2009 - 08:36 PM.

Mark
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Having grandkids is God's way of giving you a 2nd chance because you were too busy working your butt off the 1st time around
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#3 Paralus

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 12:41 AM

Thanks all. No need to worry: the support centre at AntiSpyware emailed me two sets of instructions for the removoal of this pernicious bugger (it was their scan that failed at the "vinegar stroke" first followed by Malwarebytes being disabled).

Th8is involved downloading Combofix from your very own site (and renaming it Combofix22). This did, indeed, locate Max ++ rootkit and managed to restore System32.something/whatever file (my "geekspeak" is uselss) as well as delete the rootkit.

The pc now boots smoothly and the desktop sets up faster than I can ever remember. I've since run both Malwarebytes and AntiSpyware (the real deal not PC or XP AS 2010) and discovered a clean computer.

One question: how does this bugger find it's way onto your pc? I imagine one of the kids inadvertently imported it with a game or some such?

Sorry to have wasted anyone's time: I know we don't get much nowadays.

Appreciate your promt replies.

Michael.

Edited by Paralus, 05 December 2009 - 12:42 AM.


#4 garmanma

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 07:56 PM

It's easy to blame the kids with their games and music downloads.
While these are both breeding grounds for infections the problem is becoming more widespread
See the bottom of this post

If there are no longer signs of malware then please....

Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Start > Run and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok"
  • Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" Tab.
  • Click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista Users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point and Disk Cleanup.

-------------------------------

Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:
• "Simple and easy ways to keep your computer safe".
• "How did I get infected?, With steps so it does not happen again!".
• "Hardening Windows Security - Part 1 & Part 2".
• "IE Recommended Minimal Security Settings" - "How to Secure Your Web Browser".

• Avoid gaming sites, underground web pages, pirated software, crack sites, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smrgsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Many malicious worms and Trojans spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications. Read P2P Software User Advisories and Risks of File-Sharing Technology.

Edited by garmanma, 05 December 2009 - 07:57 PM.

Mark
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why won't my laptop work?

Having grandkids is God's way of giving you a 2nd chance because you were too busy working your butt off the 1st time around
Do not send me PMs with problems that should be posted in the forums. Keep it in the forums, so everyone benefits
Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook and Twitter

#5 Paralus

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 07:59 PM

Thanks again for the cogent advice: I will do as you suggest.

Your reputation precedes you given that the AntiSpyware support centre directed me to download from this site!

Thank you for all the effort.

MIchael.

Edited by Paralus, 05 December 2009 - 08:00 PM.





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