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Google launches public DNS server


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#1 CoolCatBad

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 03:27 PM

http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/

Google now offers web users the opportunity to use their massive server infrastructure as a DNS resolver, reducing latency and speeding up web browsing.

The IP addresses are 8.8.8.8. and 8.8.4.4.

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#2 Grinler

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 12:28 PM

Interesting service. For those who do not understand, you can use these DNS servers to replace your existing DNS servers if you are having problems with them or if they do not resolve certain ip addresses or if they redirect without permission. In some ways you can look at this as another option for public DNS than OpenDNS.

I am just waiting for them to start showing their own custom page when a host does not resolve. Right now it gives the normal error, but I can't imagine they wont try and monetize this somehow.

#3 swagger

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 02:47 PM

I get the same feeling Grinler. Everything else they do is driven by ad revenue, why not this? I for one am not contributing to this monopoly!

Regards,
Keith

#4 Jaybird934

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 06:06 PM

It's not till now that I realize I don't know as much about DNS settings as I thought I did. Using windows XP, I entered the google DNS servers inside "local area conection"...in the usual place (tcpip/properties). I was already using a static IP....along with the static default DNS's for my ISP, which I replaced. HOWEVER, I read somewhere that you also need to make this change in your router, if using one. I logged into my Linksys wrt54g and discovered I can't specify a static DNS server here unless I turn my DHCP server back on (I am locked out of this area otherwise). So this leads me to the following questions:

1) Can I use static DNS servers settings on my PCs even though my router still lists different ones (with the DHCP server turned off)???

2) or, IF I must turn DHCP back on to change this in my router as well, can I keep using static IPs on my LAN computers....so long as they are outside the IP range specified in my router??

3) If I can, why do so many sites advising how to use a static IP insist that DHCP be turned off??

thanks for any guidance, JB

#5 Orecomm

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 08:15 PM

The DNS entries in your router are only used for two things, to specify the source used if the router is handing out DNS info in DHCP responses, and to resolve DNS names used on the router itself, like update pages and NTP hosts. If you aren't using the DHCP function then whatever is in the router is completely immaterial to any other computer in your network. Many routers are using DNS caching, which passes their own address to DHCP clients, but under the covers it is still the DNS programmed in or retrieved from the ISP DHCP reply. In short, you should be good with just the static info on your PC's.

So your answers are:
1) Yes
2) Yes
3) Because many folks can't or won't tell what addresses are in the DHCP assigned range, and end up with duplicate IP's.

#6 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 06:38 AM

What is a good way of testing the Google DNS speed? I pinged yahoo.com for instance but I get different average speeds each time I ping, so sometimes Google DNS seem quicker and other times my broadband DNS seem quicker, if I go by my ping results.

Is there a better way? There is one destination that seems 20% quicker every time I ping it...www.google.com. lol.

Does anyone think Google is providing this service to gather information on our browsing habits?

Oh and what an easy address to remember! I'm sure all you network troubleshooters would love that.

Edited by TheyCallMeMrGlass, 17 February 2010 - 06:46 AM.

"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#7 Grinler

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 10:22 AM

Google DNS is only for name resolution. Once it resolves a name it has no affect in your connections.

#8 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 12:00 PM

Google DNS is only for name resolution. Once it resolves a name it has no affect in your connections.


Thanks for your answer. I know that Google DNS wont speed up a connection but Google claims that their DNS server will speed up web browsing. So I just thought I test their claims! Obviously there is a latency time for a domain name to be resolved into its IP address. So I thought pinging/tracert the name would give a good indication. But as as i said in my last post, I get varying times for just one destination.

Thinking about it more though, once the name is resolved, it stays resolved in the local cache right, unless I flush the DNS? Or am I misunderstanding the whole concept?

Edited by TheyCallMeMrGlass, 18 February 2010 - 04:16 AM.

"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#9 Grinler

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 12:20 PM

Correct...so pinging wont be a good indicator. To test this you would need to create a web page thatwas calling data from 50 hosts and time that using different dns servers.

#10 Jaybird934

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 08:34 PM

TheyCallMe, I actually held back little info that wasn't really relevant till your question. The google public DNS announcement just got me interested...but I've since tried a couple pieces of freeware that do what you're wanting. One is called DNS bench, and the other is namebench. I think I like DNS bench better...and it gave me many free public DNS servers that are faster than the ones I was using by default on Comcast. It actually ran tests to determine how much faster each server would be. Even better, neither program installs itself in the typical sense....in fact, DNS bench is just a simple little executable file that runs only when you want it too, while namebench extracts to your temp folder and runs. With my new public DNS servers, my browsing is now slightly faster, especially during peak hours when Comcast's DNS servers seems to occasionally take a few seconds to resolve names. It's not for everyone, but I can honestly say I'm happy I did it despite being skeptical at first.

oh, and thanks for the detailed answer Orecomm!

Edited by Jaybird934, 17 February 2010 - 08:35 PM.


#11 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 05:12 AM

@jaybird, That DNS Bench program is excellent. Thanks for mentioning it. I have 2 broadbands at home, 1 personal and 1 business use. I ran it on both, and found that one of my ISP DNS is below 90% reliable and quite slower. Google seems to come 5-6th place on public DNSs with OpenDNS coming 1st/2nd.

So Google DNS appears to be a good alternative if our current DNS is underperforming but not as fast as OpenDNS, NTT and BT.
"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#12 CaveDweller2

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 08:53 AM

LOL how much slower can it be? 1 or 2 seconds. This isn't about anyone specific but isn't it hilarious when people say "OMG this site is taking FOREVER to open" and its like 3 seconds. They put people on the Moon with slide rules and people complain that it is taking 3 seconds for a page to open! Am I the only one that thinks that is funny?

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College


#13 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 10:26 AM

Its funny alright, but its tragic too...we lost the art of patience ;)

Regards to the DNS alternatives, its not just about the speed but the differences between DNS alternatives in their reliability of resolving domain names. (I'm saying this quite defensively, lol)

I spent 10.35 seconds typing this, I hope it was a worthwhile comment. I hate to think 10 seconds of my life wasted...
"I saw 3 Dusters like this one, at the station. Inside the dusters were 3 men. Inside the men were 3 bullets"

#14 CaveDweller2

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 11:28 AM

Well thank you for wasting 3 seconds of my life reading that!!! OMG not to mention the time opening it! STOP WASTING MY TIME! ROFL :thumbsup: :flowers: :trumpet:

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

Associate in Applied Science - Network Systems Management - Trident Technical College





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