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Help, my computer doesn't start up


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#1 pandamoose

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:04 PM

Hey guys,

First off, I would like to thank anyone who contributes any help towards my issue. I very much appreciate the time you guys spend helping others on the forums.

Onto the info:

My computer's been working fine for a few months now. I generally never turn it off. Recently I had to go home from school for thanksgiving break. I turned my computer off only to find that it never starts up ever again. When I push the power button now, I don't see anything on my monitor, there are no beeps, and the only sound which I hear other than the humming of the fan is a click that happens every 2 seconds or so. This happened once a few days before also when I turned my computer off, but it worked when I unplugged my monitor so I figured it is some kind of graphics card or gfx driver issue, but this time unplugging the monitor doesn't do anything to help the situation. I generally consider myself pretty good with computers, so I tried to troubleshoot a bit and locate the source of the problem.

I removed my graphics card: no effect
I unplugged the hard drives, DVD, and any other things that eat up power: no effect
I unplugged the front and back side USB ports: no effect
I unplugged the PC speaker: the click went away, but the computer still did not boot
I removed one chip of ram at a time: no effect

Here are the specs for my computer:
Intel Core 2 Quad Q8200 2.33G
2GB DDR3 PC1333 Ram (in 2 sticks of ram 1GB each)
680W Power Supply
GeForce 9800GT 1GB 16X PCI-E Graphics Card
Other removable hardware (4 SATAII hard drives, 1 DVD drive, USB drives, Card Reader, 2x external hard drives, 2 monitors (VGA with digital converter), speaker system.)

Thanks again for any help offered

Edited by pandamoose, 02 December 2009 - 01:05 PM.


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#2 Jeff Campbell

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:27 PM

type of motherboard? does it have an onboard video card?

#3 Sneakycyber

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 04:39 AM

Sounds like either your PSU or Case power switch. Do you have another PSU you can try with the motherboard to get it to POST?

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#4 Roger Stace

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 07:50 AM

Hi

Overheating perhaps, fried motherboard? Does fans turn when you turn power on?

Try resetting your Centeral Processing Unit + FAN

Clear Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor or Battery

Replace motherboard, I have lots of those that cirucuit fails on the board.

#5 pandamoose

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:40 PM

Type of mother board:

I'm not totally sure. it's an nvidia motherboard, that's all i know, and no it does not have an onboard.


PSU case/power switch:
I took out the motherboard and put it in a cardboard box, and it's still causing the issue. I also changed to a spare cpu and it's still having the same problems.


Overheating:
I reset the CMOS and nothing, I doubt it's a fried motherboard. It's pretty new.


An update:
I put my computer back into the case, I took the ram chips and switched their slots, and after about 8 or 9 tries, it decided to start up again. I haven't turned it off and I'm afraid that if I do, it'll not turn on again. I'm assuming that if it started up, it's not the motherboard and/or cpu...I'm really not sure what this might be. Any other ideas?

#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 10:05 PM

Did you try a new Power supply? it could be the switching in the power supply is not working correctly. Cycling it ion and of while you were moving the RAM around likely caused the power supply to finally turn back on. If your find the computer no responsive again I would try a different power supply or follow these directions to test it. The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test a ATX PSU. Some manufacturers Like Dell have used some non ATX PSUs which have a different pinout for the 20/4 pin connector, please confirm that your PSU is a ATX type before using this procedure.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.

Chad Mockensturm 

Systems and Network Engineer

Certified CompTia Network +, A +


#7 pandamoose

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 09:49 AM

Did you try a new Power supply? it could be the switching in the power supply is not working correctly. Cycling it ion and of while you were moving the RAM around likely caused the power supply to finally turn back on. If your find the computer no responsive again I would try a different power supply or follow these directions to test it. The purpose of this procedure is to bypass the motherboard to test a ATX PSU. Some manufacturers Like Dell have used some non ATX PSUs which have a different pinout for the 20/4 pin connector, please confirm that your PSU is a ATX type before using this procedure.

Caution:
This procedure will involve working with live 12VDC electrical potentials which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock. Proper precautions should also be taken to prevent electrostatic discharges (ESDs) within the case of the computer. For safety purposes please follow the instructions step by step.

First, shutdown your computer. Then unplug the power cable going into your computer.

Once you have opened the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity.

The connector of the PSU which connects to the motherboard is readily recognizable by the number of wires in the bundle. To disconnect it you will need to press on the plastic clip to disengage it and then pull the connector up and away from the motherboard. Please take notice of the location of the locking tab and the notch on the socket of the motherboard, this will only connect one way as it is keyed. This wire bundle will have a memory of the way it has been installed and will want to bend back that direction, you may have to play around with it to find a position that the connector will stay in the same position while you run the test.

Posted Image

From the top left to right the pins are 13-24, the bottom from left to right are 1-12.


Please notice that there are PSUs with 24 pin and 20 pin connectors, the location of the green wire in the 24 pin connector is #16, and the green wire in the 20 pin connector is #14. If you look at the connector with socket side facing you and the clip on the top the number one pin will be on the bottom left corner. This makes the pin out for the 24 pin connector from left to right 13-24 on top, and 1-12 on the bottom. The pin out for the 20 pin connector from left to right is 11-20 on top , and 1-10 on the bottom. If you look at the connectors you notice that these are sockets that fit over the pins on the motherboard where the PSU cable attaches, this is where you will place the jumper. For a jumper you will need a piece of solid wire about the size of a paper clip (20-22 awg), preferably a wire with insulation. It will need to be large enough to fit firmly into the socket so that it will not need to be held in place while testing. You are at risk of electrical shock if you are holding the jumper when you power up the PSU. Insert one end of the jumper into the socket of the Green wire, and insert the other end into the socket of any Black wire.

Once the jumper is in place plug the cord back in. If the PSU is working properly the case fans, optical drives, hdds, and LEDs should power up and remain on. I would suggest that you not leave this connected any longer than is necessary for safety purposes.

To reconnect the 20/4 pin connector unplug the power cord, remove the jumper, and reconnect the connector. Take a moment at this time to make sure that nothing has been dislodged inside the case.


Wow that's a very detailed response. I probably don't have the tools to try this at school, but if I can't turn my computer on when I go home for break, I'll look into this.




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