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fun.exe virus found in Documents - but am I infected?


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#1 owensanity

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 10:27 PM

Hi.

It certainly looks like I'm infected. AVG found fun.exe in my computer just after startup yesterday and today. I moved in to virus vault. It was in All Users/Documents, and no folders deeper. I ran an AVG and malwarebytes scan yesterday after moving it to the vault, and apart from a bundle of cookies my system seemed clean. But it is back in the same place again today. All I ran this morning was World of Warcraft before AVG found the virus. I found nothing in my startup files, and I ran a ccleaner clean and registry clean yesterday, as I do regularly.

My main suspects, if I am infected, are World of Warcraft addons, utorrent, or the cable that I use to get internet (sounds paranoid, but I'm in India at the moment and the connection here is different to what I'm used to - just a cable that runs into my house and into the back of my computer).

I've got a hijackthis log and couldn't see anything suspicious, but then I don't really know what to look for - shall I post it?

Thanks very much for your time.

Edited by owensanity, 02 December 2009 - 07:06 AM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 09:37 AM

Did you update Malwarebytes Anti-Malware before scanning. If not, please do, then rescan again but this time perform a Full Scan in normal mode and check all items found for removal. Don't forgot to check for database definition updates through the program's interface (preferable method) before scanning and to reboot afterwards. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware. When done, click the Logs tab and copy/paste the contents of the new report in your next reply.

Please download the Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool save to your Desktop.
Be sure to print out and read the instructions provided in How to use Kaspersky virus removal tool.
  • Double-click the setup file (i.e. setup_7.0.0.290_24.06.2009_12-58.exe) to install the utility.
  • If using Vista, right-click on it and Run As Administrator.
    If you receive a UAC prompt asking if you would like to continue running the program, you should press the Continue button.
    .
  • Click Next to continue.
  • It will install by default to your desktop folder. Click Next.
  • Click Ok at the prompt for scanning in Safe Mode if you booted into safe mode.
  • A box will open with a tab that says Automatic scan.
  • Under Automatic scan make sure these are checked.
  • System Memory
  • Startup Objects
  • Disk Boot Sectors
  • My Computer
  • Any other drives (except CD-ROM drives)
  • Click on the Scan button.
  • If malware is detected, place a checkmark in the Apply to all box, and click the Delete button (or Disinfect if the button is active).
  • After the scan finishes, if any threats are left unneutralized in the Scan window (Red exclamation point), click the Neutralize all button.
  • In the window that opens, place a checkmark in the Apply to all box, and click the Delete button (or Disinfect if the button is active).
  • If advised that a special disinfection procedure is required which demands system reboot, click the Ok button to close the window.
  • In the Scan window click the Reports button, name the report AVPT.txt and select Save to file.
  • This tool should uninstall when you close it so please save the report log before closing.
  • When done, close the Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool.
  • You will be prompted if you want to uninstall the program. Click Yes.
  • You will then be prompted that to complete the uninstallation, the computer must be restarted. Select Yes to restart the system.
  • Copy and paste only the first part of the report (Detected) in your next reply. Do not include the longer list marked Events.
If you cannot run the Kaspersky AVP Removal Tool in normal mode, then try using it in "safe mode".
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#3 quietman7

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 09:40 AM

Using any peer-to-peer (P2P) or file sharing program (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, uTorrent, Azureus/Vuze) is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, and exposure of personal information.

The reason for this is that file sharing relies on its members giving and gaining unfettered access to computers across the P2P network. This practice can make you vulnerable to data and identity theft, system infection and remote access exploit by attackers who can take control of your computer without your knowledge. Even if you change the risky default settings to a safer configuration, downloading files from an anonymous source increases your exposure to infection because the files you are downloading may actually contain a disguised threat. Many malicious worms and Trojans, such as the Storm Worm, target and spread across P2P files sharing networks because of their known vulnerabilities. In some instances the infection may cause so much damage to your system that recovery is not possible and a Repair Install will NOT help!. In those cases, the only option is to wipe your drive, reformat and reinstall the OS.

Even the safest P2P file sharing programs that do not contain bundled spyware, still expose you to risks because of the very nature of the P2P file sharing process. By default, most P2P file sharing programs are configured to automatically launch at startup. They are also configured to allow other P2P users on the same network open access to a shared directory on your computer. The best way to eliminate these risks is to avoid using P2P applications.Gaming sites are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. They can lead to other sites containing malware which you can inadvertently download without knowledge. Users visiting such sites may encounter innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. For these reasons gaming sites can put you at risk to fraud, phishing and theft of personal data. Even if the gaming site is a clean site, there is always the potential of some type of malware making its way there and then onto your system. In some instances an infection may have caused so much damage to your system that it cannot be successfully cleaned or repaired. In those cases, recovery is not possible and the only option is to reformat/reinstall the OS.
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