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Best Internet Security Suite - Paid or Non Paid


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#1 cn_habs

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 12:16 AM

Hey everyone, I am currently looking for an Internet security suite that best suits the following criteria in order of preference:

1- a very high detection rate
2- real time protection or whatever preventing malware from infecting my system is called.
3- user friendly
4- light on system resources.

I've been trying out NIS 2009 for a while and it's rather pretty nice with a decent detection rate. NIS 2009, KIS 2010 and ESET are the obvious choices from what I have gathered.

Please chip in. Thank you.

Edited by cn_habs, 30 November 2009 - 03:30 PM.


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#2 bluesjunior

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 06:17 AM

I am biased I suppose, having used Comodo products to safeguard my PC for years now without any major faults found but you won't get better than the latest version of Comodo CIS and it is free. Here are a couple of reviews of it and there has just been an update to the version reviewd which in my view is even better than said version. Good luck.
http://www.matousec.com/projects/proactive...roducts-ratings
http://malwareresearchgroup.com/?p=1115
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#3 Bartster

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 09:23 AM

Here is what I use.

Free. http://www.microsoft.com/Security_Essentials/

The free version of this. I run a quick scan occasionally.

http://www.filehippo.com/download_malwarebytes_anti_malware/

And this to help warn you of bad websites.

http://www.mywot.com/

Edited by Bartster, 30 November 2009 - 09:29 AM.


#4 Andrew

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 10:37 AM

I find Avast! Home Edition to be a superior, and free, security solution.

#5 quietman7

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 11:29 AM

Choosing a security toolkit with anti-virus, firewall and anti-malware programs is a matter of personal preference, your technical ability and experience, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular combination that works well for one person may not work as well for another. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone. You may need to experiment and find what is most suitable for your needs. Another factor to consider is whether you want to use paid for products or free alternatives.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

As a general rule, using more than one anti-spyware program like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, SuperAntispyware, Spybot S&D, Ad-Aware, etc will not conflict with each other or your anti-virus if using them as stand-alone scanners. In fact, doing so increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system that can occur when using more than one anti-virus. The overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware. However, if using any of their real-time resident shields (TeaTimer, Ad-Watch, MBAM Protection Module, Spyware Terminator Shields, etc) together at the same time, there can be conflicts when each application tries to compete for resources and exclusive rights to perform an action. Additionally, competing tools may even provide redundant alerts which can be annoying and/or confusing.

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites generally use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task. They tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses for each feature. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring default settings and usage.
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#6 cn_habs

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 03:22 PM

Choosing a security toolkit with anti-virus, firewall and anti-malware programs is a matter of personal preference, your technical ability and experience, features offered, the amount of resources utilized, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular combination that works well for one person may not work as well for another. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone. You may need to experiment and find what is most suitable for your needs. Another factor to consider is whether you want to use paid for products or free alternatives.

No single product is 100% foolproof and can detect and remove all threats at any given time. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear. Each vendor has its own definition of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another. Thus, a multi-layered defense using several anti-spyware products (including an effective firewall) to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and safe surfing habits provides the most complete protection.

As a general rule, using more than one anti-spyware program like Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, SuperAntispyware, Spybot S&D, Ad-Aware, etc will not conflict with each other or your anti-virus if using them as stand-alone scanners. In fact, doing so increases your protection coverage without causing the same kind of conflicts or affecting the stability of your system that can occur when using more than one anti-virus. The overlap of protection from using different signature databases will aid in detection and removal of more threats when scanning your system for malware. However, if using any of their real-time resident shields (TeaTimer, Ad-Watch, MBAM Protection Module, Spyware Terminator Shields, etc) together at the same time, there can be conflicts when each application tries to compete for resources and exclusive rights to perform an action. Additionally, competing tools may even provide redundant alerts which can be annoying and/or confusing.

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites generally use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task. They tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses for each feature. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring default settings and usage.


Is this combination good enough: one of the security suites I mentioned + Malwarebytes' + SpywareBlaster + IOBit Security 360 + CCleaner+ WinPatrol

I don't want to overcomplicate my life even further. Most importantly, I do have some common sense most of the time. :thumbsup:

#7 quietman7

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 03:46 PM

See IOBitís Denial of Theft Unconvincing, IOBits piracy
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#8 C03_M4NN

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Posted 01 December 2009 - 05:19 PM

Also just to toss this in, I'm not sure how true it is anymore however when I was at my job a while ago I was working closely with Virus' and spyware programs , and the removal of them. From my understanding, when a new Virus is released technically by Law, the companies now need to inform all makes ie; norton, avg, CA etc of how to remove the threat.
This was largely made to prevent companies from creating virus' to become more superior in the marketing of AV suites..... so if this is true, most software will work, however there will always be new things comming out, and NOTHING will ever be fool proof.... It's personal pref of what you use and how you enjoy using it / what you want it to do.... kind of like why some people own electric cars compared to 5ltr mustangs :thumbsup:

#9 Mhoople

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 09:32 PM

Are there any unbiased rating for Anti-Virus programs? Or is there any general consensus from the people who help others with their virus problems at this forum? I tried AVG free and Microsofts new Security Essentials but got badly infected with Vundo variations. In particular I'd like real time protection to prevent entering unsafe sites on the web.

#10 Andrew

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 10:15 PM

I find Virus Bulletin helpful, here's their December 2009 comparison of AV's: http://www.virusbtn.com/vb100/archive/2009/12, though you have to be a paid subscriber to see the details.

Edited by Amazing Andrew, 06 December 2009 - 10:17 PM.


#11 quietman7

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 10:58 AM

Independent comparatives of Anti-virus Software
click on the "Comparatives" link on the left
TopTen Review: AntiVirus Software Product Comparisons
AntiVirus Software Comparisons for 2009

These types of comparative testing results will vary depending on who is doing the testing, what they are testing for, what versions of anti-virus software is being tested, etc. There are no universally predefined set of standards/criteria for testing and each test will yield different results. Thus, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, and data results. Read Anti-virus Testing Websites: An overview of testing sites
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#12 cn_habs

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 04:13 PM

Independent comparatives of Anti-virus Software
click on the "Comparatives" link on the left
TopTen Review: AntiVirus Software Product Comparisons
AntiVirus Software Comparisons for 2009

These types of comparative testing results will vary depending on who is doing the testing, what they are testing for, what versions of anti-virus software is being tested, etc. There are no universally predefined set of standards/criteria for testing and each test will yield different results. Thus, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, and data results. Read Anti-virus Testing Websites: An overview of testing sites


Thank you all for the input.

G-Data among the best? I've never heard of it before.

Anyway, I uninstalled NIS 2010 and installed KIS 2010 recently. While task manager indicates that it uses only 3 MB of memeory, I clearly noticed a performance hit as random freezes would occur occasionally. Maybe I am using the Sandboxed Firefox?

I couldn't find any ESET products on Ebay whereas NIS and KIS cleary flood that place. I guess I'll stick with the smoother more responsive NIS 2010 then and use common sense.




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