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Removing starup programs


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#1 bettei

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 02:51 PM

It seems like my computer is slowing down in loading, and the fan comes on quite a bit when I am playing games and other things. I looked at my task manager and saw that I have 50 processes that run on my computer, and wondered if eliminating some of them would help. I have XP Media 2005.

I went to msconfig to look at my startup programs, and while I thought I had java updater unchecked, it still seems to be there. I ran a program called "autoruns" and it made a long list of just what was running on my computer. And in that report said "sunjavaupdatesched" was in there and something called "tkbellexe". I was unsure about that one, and closed out of Autorun before unchecking it. I found out that it was not necessary by your startup list, and went back to uncheck it, and darned if I can find it again. ??

There is also called "real networking inc, update. But when I go to msconfig and look at my startups, I already have "jusched" unchecked (which I thought was Java update), and the DMA scheduler unchecked. So why are they listed in my autorun report?

And then I clicked on the service tab in the Service configuration Utility window, and read what I had in there. Java quick starter is listed there, with an "unknown" for a manufacturer. Why is that still there, and why no manufacture name there with it?

I have run a virus scan, Malware Antibytes scan, even one in safe mode, all come out clean. And while I was in safe mode, I looked at "my programs". There was something there called "Webex". What is that, and is it necessary? I don't recall seeing that in my programs in regular mode. I also question if these things are necessary...
Apple mobile device support...I don't have an ipod, but do have Itunes on my computer. Will any itunes music play if that is removed?
Bonjour
Adobe air
Capicom.
And is it wise to remove the microsoft "Money" program? I don't use it, but I do not want to cause a problem to something else if I remove it.

The whole time the computer was running in safe mode, the fan on my computer was running on high. Is that normal? Are ongoing games that you build over time on Facebook harmful to your computer? The fan kicks on and off when I am playing those games too. It just seems like it is carrying a heavy load. Last time I looked I had 1.9 GB of memory left. I clean my cache, compact disks and run defrag often. I don't know much about computers, but it seems like I could do away with some of these running processes.

And lastly, is Real Player 11Gold a legitimate player? I have the icon on my desktop and wanted to see if I could get into the options tab to see if it was starting up in my startup programs, but it was not even installed. I would have to install it in order to go to the options. So I thought I would ask about this before installing it.
Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 03:30 PM

The following is nothing but personal opinions, as any attempt to manage installed programs/startups is.

<<I looked at my task manager and saw that I have 50 processes that run on my computer, and wondered if eliminating some of them would help.>>

The number of processes running is itself no key to anything...you must examine the programs/functions behind the process and make a judgment as to whether you need or want that running on your system. A tool for doing such is Process Explorer - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinte...s/bb896653.aspx

Another pertinent link: Process Explorer - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinte...s/bb896653.aspx

Eliminating anything...that is just taking up room and resources on a system...I've always considered that a decent idea.

IMO...if you are going to use Autoruns as a tool, you need to do two things:

a. Read the instructions before doing anything.

b. Be prepared to use Google to look things up. Google provides access to the biggest library known in our little universe, it's up to you to use it.

Many, if not all, of the questions that you asked...a reliable answer can be formulated by you...if you use the tools available.

FWIW: When using Autoruns...the Logon tab is the one which reflects what user normally consider startup items. Each of the other tabs displays information of either a different nature or accumulated in a particular format...which should not be examined when looking for startup items.

It's your system...it's your ship to run any way that you feel and that means that you are the only person who can decide what is instaled and what is not, what's running and what should not.

Louis

#3 bettei

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 12:58 PM

I did look up some entries I questioned in your startup list. But several are listed as "not necessary" but also "could be a trojan". That is what is confusing. How does a person know the difference unless you are an expert?
And clearly I am not, so that is why I asked these quesions, because I would rather be safe than sorry in deleting something I am not sure of.
Thanks

#4 hamluis

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 01:28 PM

Understood :thumbsup:, but...

No one in the XP forum..is an "expert" at determining whether a file is valid or is malware...but a user can usually look at the stated file size and the location of the file...and then make a guess.

For expert opinions on possible malware items...we have our malware forums....where people trained to deal with malware go through various procedures to determine whether a system has a malware problem...and how to respond to such, if it exists.

If a file relates to a program which you know is installed...and it's in the seemingly proper place...chances are it's not a malware item (that's how I approach it, innocent until proven guilty).

Many files "could be a trojan" since malware has no qualms about usurping a filename or making a filename that is close to a valid file. Again, file location and size are the only two factors (outside of a description of the file, where it belongs, and what might have installed it) that I know that a person can use.

Users tend to forget...no one who is viewing your post...has access to your system, no one can check these things quicker than the original poster.

If I see a file that is both "unnecessary" and "could be a trojan"...I try to remember that I don't like unnecessary items using system resources and my system defenses have never let me down in ridding my system of malware items that could disrupt system functioning.

I tend to prefer Google to any startup listing...because I get more opinions and the information is more current, IMO...than any listing/database which may be maintained by one website on the Internet.

<<...and the fan comes on quite a bit when I am playing games and other things.>>

That is by design, the fan is there to relieve some of the stress brought on by heat when the system is working harder than normal. I don't game, but my opinion is that gaming is the most stressful thing a user can do to aystem, outside of overclocking. I would expect the fans to work overtime under either of those situations.

System manufacturer and model? How much RAM is installed? How much free space on the C: partition?

Louis

#5 bettei

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 04:32 PM

I always forget where to find that info...but on my computer properties it looks like I have 1.99 GB of ram. and 226GB of free space on my C drive. I know the last time I did a defrag, it said I did not need to do it.

I think you learn a little with every question you ask, so that is why I ask them! :thumbsup:

#6 hamluis

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 05:26 PM

No problem...as you see, I tend to ask a lot of questions myself :flowers:. I like to have useful info before I open my big mouth with my ideas of what could be happening :thumbsup: .

There are various tools one can use...to find out information about an XP system. Probably one of the most neglected is viewed by Start/Run...type msinfo32 and hit Enter or OK. Loads of detail about hardware, software, and Windows as each applies to the individual system. Probably more detail than most want.

Additionally, there are little programs that a user can install, such as SIW System Information for Windows - http://www.gtopala.com/.

In any case, you seem to have plenty of RAM and hard drive space.

IMO, defrag is important but not as important as running chkdsk /.

Start/Run...type chkdsk /r (space between k and /) and hit Enter or OK. When black screen comes up, type Y in response to onscreen query and hit Enter or OK. Reboot the system.

The command will execute its job between initial boot and going into Windows XP. Once it is finished, it will reboot automatically into XP.

FWIW: IMO, it's best to defrag (whenever one chooses to defrag) after running chkdsk /r first. The "experts" say that it doesn't matter, but that was the recommended sequence I picked up when the chkdsk predecessor (scan disk) was around.

Louis

#7 bettei

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 05:37 PM

What is the purpose of doing this? Will it compact old files or try to repair a bad sector or what?

#8 hamluis

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 05:52 PM

Worth reading, IMO:

How to Understand and Use Chkdsk in Windows XP - http://vlaurie.com/computers2/Articles/chkdsk.htm

CHKDSK Utility - http://www.hard-drive-help.com/chkdsk.html

In a nutshell, chkdsk is designed to do light (but important) maintenance on the hard drive, the file system, and Windows.

The chkdsk /r command will try to move data which is located in bad sectors (bad sectors are not repaired, they are merely avoided, not used). The chkdsk /p or chkdsk /f commands (which some often cite) will not make any attempt to deal with files which are in bad sectors. Since what those commands do is also included in what is accomplished by running chkdsk /r, I just suggest that users forget about the other commands and use the one which potentially does the system the most good.

Louis




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