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Windows XP just keeps rebooting itself.


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5 replies to this topic

#1 matzilla

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 02:05 PM

Here's what happened: I downloaded a torrent file (supposed to be a PDF) and without even looking at it I double-clicked it before I realized it was an .EXE. I tried my best to stop it, but i'm not very computer savvy.

After trying to stop it I ran Malwarebytes. "Some infections could not be cleaned." I changed my setting in spybot to start itself upon restart. I noticed before I restarted my computer that whatever I installed had dumped 3 adult shortcuts, presumably to websites, though I didnt click them, on my desktop. I deleted them and then restarted.

Now my computer wont start windows. I checked other forums, as well as this one, based on the (very) limited knowledge I have of computers, and found only one person who seemed to have the same problem as me.
Basically the responder suggested trying to delete the process from the task manager, but I dont know how to do that if windows wont load. His idea was that the malware was preventing antivirus from starting up, thus windows itself could not start.

My computer seems to load (motherboard?) drivers just fine but when it attempts to load windows it just restarts the computer. I was given the option to load in safe mode, last known settings that worked, and normal mode. None of these worked, my computer just restarts instead of starting windows. Also the option of starting with a command prompt, but i didnt mess with that because I dont know what it is.

I assume by copy of windows is legit, but I didnt install it myself, so I dont have a windows CD.

Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated. Also, try not to use too much technical language as I have a limited knowledge of computers. Eg: I have no idea what a registry is or how it works.

Thanks. matt

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#2 AustrAlien

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 04:06 PM

To get a look at the error message presented by the BSOD (blue screen of death).
Start tapping the F8 key after you press the ON button, and continue tapping until you are presented with the "Windows Advanced Options Menu" screen.
Use the UP/DOWN arrow keys to select "Disable automatic restart on system failure" and press the <ENTER> key.
Your system will attempt to restart normally, but when it crashes, it will not re-start. Instead, you will see a BSOD with error message.
Record the error message in full detail, and post in this thread.

Also, please try the following from the Windows Advanced Options Menu ...
Choose "Last known good configuration", and press the Enter key. The computer will attempt to load Windows.
If Windows does not start, try the same thing again .... and continue trying for 10 times, before you rule that option out as a means of getting your OS up and running again, normally.
Why 10 times? Based on past experience, a successful result is sometimes achieved after several consecutive failed attempts.

Try starting in "Safe Mode with Command Prompt".
If this does load (it could be useful), simply type "exit" in the box and press the <ENTER> key to restart the system.

Please post the results of trying the above steps.

Edited by AustrAlien, 20 November 2009 - 04:50 PM.

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#3 azfreetech

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 04:50 PM

In this case what I would do is pull the hard drive and connect it as a slave to a known working computer. Boot that computer up, make sure the drive you connected is recognized by going to My Computer and see if it's listed. I woudl install MBAM and SUPERAntiSpyware on the working computer and run the scans of the infected drive using the good computer. Each program allows you to select which drive you want to scan.

There are tools that can be used to run virus and malware scans before the Windows OS boots up as well which may possibly save you the time of having to pull the drive but I can't guarantee that they would work as well. Hiren's makes a kick ass bootable CD and you can also get the ultimate Boot CD. They are both free online and Hiren's gives you step by step instructions on how to make the file a .iso image and then how to burn it to a CD so you can boot from it.

More informaiton can be found at:
Hirens
Ultimate Boot CD
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#4 matzilla

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 06:16 PM

You guys are awesome, thanks for the replies.

AustraAlien:

BSOD says:

A problem has been detected and windows has been shut down to prevent damage to you computer.

If this is the first time you've seen this stop error screen, restart you computer. If this screen appears again, follow these steps:

Disable or uninstall any anti-virus, disk defragmentation or backup utilities. Check your hard drive configuration, and check for any updated drivers. Run CHKDSK /F to check for hard drive corruption and then restart your computer.

Technical Information:
***STOP: 0x00000024 (0x001902FE, 0xF78c6380, 0xf78c607c, 0x8A2cc805)

I tried booting from -Last Known Good Config- (10x) and Safe Mode W/Command Prompt. Neither worked, just rebooted as usual.


Azfreetech:
Thanks for the info. I don't know why I didn't think of that. My girlfriend's computer is in the same room as my own, and would be fairly easy for my to just put my drive in her computer and scan it slave-wise.


I figured I'd go ahead and post what I've done so far and see what you guys think before I take anything apart.

Matt.

#5 azfreetech

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 07:34 PM

The Stop 0x00000024 message indicates that a problem occurred within Ntfs.sys, the driver file that allows the system to read and write to NTFS file system drives.

This could indicate a problem with the hard drive itself or it could be an issue with a corrupted system or data volume that is using NTFS. After researching this I found one solution was to try booting from the OS disk.

From Microsoft:
"If you receive a "stop 0x24" error message when you restart the computer or when you try to run Setup or Recovery Console, you may not be able to determine the cause of the problem. Instead, use one of the following methods to resolve the corrupted NTFS volume. "

"FAT or FAT32 File System
If your system partition is using the FAT or FAT32 file system, disconnect or turn off any data disks that contain NTFS volumes. This allows you to start back into the operating system to perform troubleshooting steps. If you can determine which NTFS volume is causing the boot problem, use the following steps:
Make sure the drive that contains the corrupted NTFS volume is disconnected, and then start Windows by using Safe mode.
Rename the %SystemRoot%\System32\Drivers\Ntfs.sys file to Ntfs.old, and then shut down the computer (this action prevents the Ntfs.sys driver from loading).
Reconnect the drive that contains the corrupted NTFS volume.
Restart the computer, and then run the following command on the corrupted NTFS volume:
chkdsk driveletter: /f
NOTE: The Chkdsk tool has built-in support for NTFS and does not require the Ntfs.sys driver to make repairs.


After you use the Chkdsk tool to repair the corrupted NTFS volume, rename %SystemRoot%\System32\Drivers\Ntfs.old to Ntfs.sys, and then shut down and restart the computer.
The computer should be operational again, and you can try to determine what caused the original problem. "

Edited by azfreetech, 20 November 2009 - 07:35 PM.

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#6 AustrAlien

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Posted 21 November 2009 - 03:54 AM

Remove the hard drive from the box and connect it to another computer.

Use the Windows XP Error checking utility - Check Disk (chkdsk /f ONLY).
Open "My Computer" and then right-click on the drive that you wish to check.
Select Properties > Tools, and in the Error checking section, click on "Check now".
Place a check mark in the box beside "Automatically fix file system errors" ONLY, and click "Start".
If there are any errors reported, run the disk check again. Repeat until there are no errors reported.

Run the malware scans as suggested earlier and remove whatever is found. Run again, until clean.
Then put the hard drive back in the original box and attempt to start normally.
What happens?
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