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Monitoring "accumulative" run time


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#1 Keith1

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Posted 18 November 2009 - 04:35 PM

I'm trying to help a friend find a solution to this, but to no avail.

He is running XP home and wants to monitor his run time. He wants to monitor run time irregardless of re-boots. We have both "Googled" the topic and all programs we can find reset to zero upon reboot. Is there a program that will accumulate run time irregardless of reboots?

Thanks.

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#2 ziula

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 08:24 PM

Me, too! I'm in the same condition, searching Google up and down, trying for an answer. If you are "... running XP home and wants to monitor his run time", so I'm asking myself where is located the Windows register that does this task. Times ago I downloaded a program offered to be used "freely" for a period. Time passed and the program become inoperative, just because the run time system locked the platform. Naturally, the register is not "assigned", or I would find it yet.
So, we are in the same boat, even that in different ways. But, I promise you, if I'll find something been proximate to this matter, I'll post it asap! As you can see, English is not my first language, so I apologize. Regards.

#3 Keith1

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 11:06 PM

No need at all to apologize ziula - your wording was just fine. And welcome to the board, this may just be an issue that there is no answer to - can't be done. But have confidence that if there is a way someone here will have the answer.

Keith

#4 ziula

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 08:20 AM

Hi, I don’t think so about this matter. I’ve read about the “high end services”, since 1990. You know, they are programs applied to other dedicated software. I mean, you have a program with abilities to trade in stock exchange, and it is so good that you decided to sell it to people use it in their trades. Well, nobody wants spent money in such a program whose abilities doesn’t know very well. So, my way is to give permission to this guy to download my program, in order to test it, during a certain amount of time. Ended this time (time that is counted and accumulated – this is the central point), the guy has to pay for continuing to use my service or my embedded auxiliary counter program will block his access to the platform.
I’d search “high end service” at Wikipedia, and read interesting ideas concerning run time, just applied to these attached programs, made to control the time elapsed from the initial download of a demo license until its expiration. I know such programs are downloaded (or created) in the machine data register HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>SYSTEM>CurrentControlSet>Services and then they can be used to measure “accumulative run time”. Logically, they are full of encrypt keys to avoid crackers and so on. Well, here our points of view differ a little bit, first because I’m trying “to open” these embedded programs (that contain the information about to count run time) just to inhibit the counter, and second because you are interested into create one dedicated to “only” count machine “accumulative run time”.
I don’t know write program language, but it seems to me that we are treating the opposite faces of the same coin… or not?! So, I conclude, there is a possibility to develop a program to measure accumulative run time.
Cheers.
Luiz Antonio




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