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memory optimizers


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#1 rani9

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 07:54 PM

:thumbsup: I've had my computer for 3 years, but my knowledge is still seriously limited. Just yesterday I downloaded "Memory Optimizer" (freeware) from Brentliem Software. It seems to be working very well. (My computer wasn't slow before, but it's faster now.) Just today, I stumbled upon some very uncomplimentary info or opinion about memory optimizers, in general. Basically, the negative info states that, at best, memory optimizers do nothing -- and might even cause problems. Now I'm scared. Can anybody tell me more? Thanks so much.

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#2 windowsxp550

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 08:51 PM

I can't speak to much as far as other memory optimizers, but personally, I only use the memory optimizer that was made by Microsoft.

The one, I'm referring to is called CLEARMEM . Clearmem is a DOS Utility (don't worry it runs in windows, when you click on it, it will open up a DOS window) .... what it does is, it forces pages out of physical memory so it reduces the size of running processes.

For more information on Clearmem, just do a Google Search for it.

If you want to download it and try it, I do have it available on my website: http://www.fixmyxp.com/ On the main page it is on the left hand side about a third of the way down the page.
Free PC Help: At FixMyXP.com, our Speciality is Windows XP.
Got An XP Problem or Question? Get expert help, all free Check it out!
Click Here to go to FixMyXP's Windows XP Help Forum

#3 rani9

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 08:58 PM

:thumbsup: Thank you, windowsxp550. I'll definitely read up on CLEARMEM. I didn't even know about it until your post!

#4 River_Rat

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 09:56 PM

I will throw my .02 in also:
Well I don't know what OS you are running but memory optimizers in XP are basicly useless, XP does a fine job of managing it's memory and was designed to do so.
http://www.windowsitpro.com/Windows/Articl...095/pg/1/1.html

http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm

Clearmem has been around for years and all it does is dump your physical memory into your swap file, unused memory is wasted memory. Clearmem was used for older Windows versions that had a problem with lingering data. XP and other newer versions of Windows do not have that problem.

#5 windowsxp550

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:13 PM

XP and other newer versions of Windows do not have that problem.


This is not true. While I agree with you that Windows XP is a huge advancement in memory management, it is by in no means good enough to say that XP does not have that problem....A great example of this is all of the Explorer.exe memory leaks that have plagued XP. Microsoft has kept having to patch them...even after SP2, there are still issues.
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#6 River_Rat

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:59 PM

Memory leaks are caused from poorly written programs that cause the pagefile to fill up and then when windows needs to move data from the ram to the virtual memory the program in question will hog too much RAM and cause the pagefile to become full.

You can monitor your memory from the performance monitor.
Start>Run>(type) perfmon
Once Performance Monitor opens, click the + button. From the Performance Object drop-down list, select Memory. Select the All Counters radio button and then click the Add button and the Close button. Monitor this for a few hours.

And you can look in the Task Manager>Processes Tab>Memory usage for the program hogging the memory.

#7 rani9

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 05:53 PM

Thanks so much to all of you who responded to my post. I'm trying to learn all that I can, and, admittedly, I do try some things that I probably shouldn't, simply because I don't know enough yet. A friend of mine who is more advanced on computers says, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Good advice, I'm sure. Thank you all again. I've learned so much from forums!

#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 06:59 AM

From Fred Langa - recognized authority

Basis question

"Memory Optimizer" Confusion
Dear Fred From a very grateful subscriber to your Plus edition...
I refer to your http://langa.com/newsletters/2004/2004-11-29.htm#9 edition and the subject of Memory Optimizers, which you suggest are scams etc. I use FreeRam XP Pro - which is a totally free utility - hardly a scam to start with ! I have a full 1024 MB of ram fitted and when I first start using the computer daily, it usually shows between 695 and 710 MB i.e. 68% Ram free."

.......................................................................................................
......................................................................................................
"It's a confusing subject, Geoff--- one made more so by the purveyors of "memory optimizers," some of whom are themselves confused, and others of whom *want* you to be confused so you'll use their products.

Here's the problem: With most computer things that can be "used up" (hard drive space, bandwidth, etc.) you want as much to be *un*used as possible. But it's just the opposite with RAM, because unused RAM is wasted RAM.

That's worth repeating, because it's the central point: Unused RAM is wasted RAM.

Thus, any tool that "frees up" RAM or "creates holes in RAM" or any similar thing is really creating a pool of unused--- wasted!--- RAM.

You see, your RAM is the fastest memory your PC has. Memory operations in RAM operate at nanosecond speeds (billionths of a second), six orders of magnitude faster than the millisecond speeds (thousandths of a second) of memory operations written to a hard drive, as "virtual memory" in the PC's swapfile.

"Freeing RAM" means you're taking data and code out of the fastest memory your system has and transferring it to the swapfile on disk, which is the *slowest* memory your system normally has. That doesn't help you. In fact, it slows you down!

Windows does a pretty good job of keeping your RAM more or less optimally full, *which is the way you want it* because you WANT as much stuff as possible kept in the fastest-available storage. When RAM gets too full, Windows correctly dribbles out the least-used and least-important code and data to the slower hard-drive storage of virtual memory; and that too is just what you want.

"Memory optimizers" can actually reverse this process so that you end up with unused areas in your best and fastest memory; and tons of code and data shifted to your worst and slowest memory (on the hard drive). In other words, they can do the exact opposite of what they claim; slowing you down, not speeding you up!"

You can read the rest of the article here:
http://www.langa.com/newsletters/2004/2004-12-16.htm#2

#9 River_Rat

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 07:19 AM

Thanks Enthusiast :thumbsup:

That is a good explanation.

#10 Leurgy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 07:33 AM

I can't point to any hard evidence of this but from a hardware standpoint its my personal opinion that these "memory optomizers" can damage Ram modules through overheating due to frequent purges.

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#11 rani9

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 07:17 PM

Thanks again to everyone. What you've said makes sense. I did uninstall Memory Optimizer, but I defragged my hard drive first, simply because it was time for that. (I defrag every week). Something happened this time that I would like to share and also get comments on, if you would be so kind. I'll try to make this as short as possible, but my inability to use technical terms makes that difficult, as you will notice. Anyway, here goes...

The first time I defragged (3 years ago), both the "before" and "after" showed some blue blocks of continguous memory toward the far right of the rectangles that exist to show such things. There was some green immovable memory near the middle, and then some blocks and lines of memory at and near the far left. Some showed up as contiguous and some were fragmented (red). After the defrag, the red had disappeared, and all blocks and lines were blue. (This is still the left side I'm talking about.) As far as I know, the blue blocks near the far right never changed; if they did change, I never noticed. I wondered why they were so far from the other blue blocks, but, since my system was working so well, I ignored the situation.

When I defragged after using Memory Optimizer, all the blue blocks on the far right disappeared. I don't know if they joined the others on the far left, or if something else happened to them. Either way, my system is still working wonderfully well, but I'm hoping someone can enlighten me. Thanks so much again and again.

#12 River_Rat

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 11:21 PM

This could be for a few different reasons but with out see a log from before and after then it is hard to say. Just off the top of my head I will say probably pagefile data, I am sure there is nothing to worry about.

There is no real reason to defrag your drive that often unless you do an awful lot of move files around.
You can use the Analyze button to see if it needs defraged.
I have seen good & bad articles about defraging to often but I have not personally seen any harm from it.

#13 stidyup

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 02:22 AM

sysinternals comment

See the above link for sysinternals take on memory optimisers.

#14 rani9

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 06:01 AM

:thumbsup: And thank you once again. Until recently, I was doing a lot of photo and artwork on the computer, and that seems to cause a lot of fragmentation. I'm not doing that so much anymore, so maybe that will make a difference. Oh, and thanks for the link to Sysinternals. I'll be glad to read what they have to say.




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