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Glossary question


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#1 bisquit maker

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 07:22 PM

Who sets the definitions in the glossary and startup list?

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#2 Grinler

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 10:21 AM

That's all me. Glossary has not been updated in a long time. I do the startups daily.

#3 bisquit maker

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 11:08 AM

I've noticed that some of the UNIX/Linux definitions aren't exactly right. CErtain information such as file hierarchy, BSD releases, and file-system information is missing.
Quite a bit of UNIX applications and shell scripts ported to Microsoft needs the information from the man pages.
E.g. Linux is a kernel, not an Operating system. All distros are not complete Open Source.
UNIX is a set of standards, similar to POSIX. Some OS's have UNIX and POSIX certification, others don't. The original system is now historical.
Other types of software licensing aren't included such as BSD and MIT or even Mozilla.
I understand that the definitions are written for the average MS user; but, there could at least be references to the above information.

#4 Grinler

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 12:18 PM

There appears to be some differing opinions as to the definition of Linux. Yes wikipedia does reference running on the linux kernel yet linux.org states:

Linux is a free Unix-type operating system
originally created by Linus Torvalds with the assistance of developers around the world. Developed under the GNU General Public License , the source code for Linux is freely available to everyone. Click on the link below to find out more about the operating system that is causing a revolution in the world of computers.


Also UNIX originally was a specific Operating System type developed at Bell Labs and is not obsolete. There are commercial packages that are still considered a flavor of Unix.

The goal here is not to be a complete encyclopedia. Their are other sites that do that much better. The goal is to just provide an easy to understand definition of a particular term for a computer user.

#5 bisquit maker

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 03:37 PM

UNIX is a set of standards, similar to POSIX. Some OS's have UNIX and POSIX certification, others don't. The original system is now historical.

Actually its Linux kernel + userland + other applications. There C compilers and preprocessors, package managers, Desktop environments, audio servers, X.org, etc which are separate. If an architecture can be ported to GCC or, in some cases, to another C compiler and work with the Linux kernel, there can at least be a base release.
It's not a complete operating system such as any BSD release.
BSD releases can be considered a flavor of UNIX. the AT&T code was completely rewritten by UC Berkley.
Source code for GPL applications is freely available. All applications used on a LInux distribution aren't GPL. BSD license doesn't require both source and binary release of a program nor does it make the author to release the source for all changes. The source code for the Kernels are freely available.

I understand that the definitions are written for the average MS user; but, there could at least be references to the above information.



#6 Grinler

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 04:32 PM

You may be, and are probably, right but unfortunately that type of info is outside the scope of the purposes of the glossary. The glossary is meant to give a 1-2 liner/small paragraph description.




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