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Clean Install of XP - OEM


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#1 meppwc

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 01:38 PM

I have never done a complete clean installation of XP (I have XP Professional OEM).

I assume the installation goes quite similar to the installation of W2K from what I have seen. But I do have several questions.

-- I have never done a clean reinstallation of an OEM operating system before, does that create a problem?

-- Once I have set the partition, formatted the drive and installaed the operating system, will I need to "re-register" the XP operating system with Microsoft? I have heard that on clean installs you have to do this or the OS quits working after a length of time. Note, I am reinstalling on the exact same hardware where this operting system originated from.

-- The disk that the system builder supplied me with is a metallic bronze color and is stamped with "Windows XP Professional", is this the disk that I would use for the reinstallation?

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 01:52 PM

Well...let's clarify first.

Two different concepts are routinely used by persons in Computerland when using the term "OEM".

a. Boxmakers like Dell, Gateway, HP, eMachines, etc. Manufacturers who assemble PCs and sell them to individual users as finished products.

b. OEM parts/systems, etc. are generally those where the user takes full responsibility for support. I have OEM licenses for XP which are now called "System Builder" licenses, I take responsibility for support tasks for my installation of XP.

It sounds to me as if you have the OEM/System Builder version of XP Pro. I've now thrown away my CDs that resemble what you describe (I use a slipstreamed/updated CD).

If the Microsoft logo is impressed upon the lower portion of the CD, that's what you have. If you have any doubts, the simple solution would be to ask your system builder.

Regarding a clean install...the following links should answer any reasonable questions:

Clean Install Procedure with Illustrative Screen Captures - http://www.theeldergeek.com/xp_home_install_-_graphic.htm

XP Clean Install, Stevens - http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html

Louis

#3 meppwc

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 01:56 PM

It has the MS logo at the bottom

#4 Captain Pike

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 02:43 PM

It sounds to me as if you have the OEM/System Builder version of XP Pro. I've now thrown away my CDs that resemble what you describe (I use a slipstreamed/updated CD).

XP Clean Install, Stevens - http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html

Louis

okay, I have a question about this. I have a legit license for the copy of Windows XP on writing on this machine right here, BUT I CAN'T FIND MY INSTALLATION DISK. It was a generic Windows XP disk from Microsoft, not a box maker type version. I would love to be able to create (a slipstreamed to SP3) installation disk, using my legit insulation numbers.
I do not have an C:\i386 on my disk.

Can this be done? I mean could I do it?

Curiouser and curiouser.

#5 hamluis

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 03:03 PM

Any CD used to create a slipstreamed/updated version of XP for a user...has only 1 requirement that I know of...it must be the same version.

Since the SPs can be slipstreamed in, it doesn't matter if it is a version without any SP...or a version with SP1, 2, or 3. It simply must be the same version, XP Home for XP Home, XP Pro for an XP Pro install.

The key to answering questions like yours...is to remember that I haven't had access to every type of MS XP install CD...so I won't swear that there aren't additional considerations. But...if you bother Googling slipstreaming procedures, you can find more data.

C:1386 has nothing to do with slipstreaming an updated XP install CD...from the contents of an install CD. That maneuver is for those who don't have a CD to begin with to use for the base files which will comprise the updated/slipstreamed CD.

The flat answer to your question...goes like this. Microsoft sellls licenses to use its products. The media containing the files required to enable such usage...sometimes come on CD/DVD, sometimes they are on a hidden partition on the system, sometimes they are on a CD which the system manufacturer has altered slightly to fit its own designs.

It's the license that is the product...it's the license that determines whether the system will work or not.

The media is merely a means of enabling the user...to acquire access to the privileges (not rights) acquired by the terms of sale. That means, generally speaking...as long as I have my license, I can have someone copy me their same version CD...and then use that to either install, repair, or update via slipstreaming...my licensed version of XP.

Louis

#6 Captain Pike

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 03:22 PM

Actually, Microsoft changes their algorithm within the same version across releases so that what you're saying MIGHT hold true. If I copy someone else's disk with the same version as my disk was, my product ID codes might work, and then again they might not. If they use the same algorithm for the production of both desks, then I'm golden.

It just seems that there ought to be away, given I still possess my authentication sticker, that I could be reissued fresh media. Turns out, I can even buy a new copy of XP. I've already spent way too much time on this, it's just that I like Windows XP, and I would like to install it legitimately upon a virtual machine.




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