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Help really appreciated


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#1 mark2009

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:02 PM

If anyone has time to take a look at this it would be much appreciated. Got caught off guard and infected by malware virus claiming that my flashplayer was out of date. Allowed an Install of a file called Flash.Player.HD.10.0.exe. File was run from external hardrive and since was deleted. Computer will now just freeze up (with any action post startup) if you attempt to operate in normal mode. Safe mode got me to this site and read some similar posts so thought I might trey my luck. My computer knowledge is really basic so try to be deliberatly obvious in instructions if you can help.
Thanks,

Mark

Edited by mark2009, 27 October 2009 - 04:24 AM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 11:06 AM

Please download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (v1.41) and save it to your desktop.
alternate download link 1
alternate download link 2

MBAM may "make changes to your registry" as part of its disinfection routine. If using other security programs that detect registry changes (ie Spybot's Teatimer), they may interfere or alert you. Temporarily disable such programs or permit them to allow the changes.

Reboot your computer in "Safe Mode with Networking using the F8 method. To do this, restart your computer and after hearing your computer beep once during startup (but before the Windows icon appears) press the F8 key repeatedly. A menu will appear with several options. Use the arrow keys to navigate and select the option to run Windows in "Safe Mode".
  • Double-click on mbam-setup.exe to install the application.
  • When the installation begins, follow the prompts and do not make any changes to default settings.
  • When installation has finished, make sure you leave both of these checked:
    • Update Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
    • Launch Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware
  • Then click Finish.
MBAM will automatically start and you will be asked to update the program before performing a scan.
  • If an update is found, the program will automatically update itself. Press the OK button to close that box and continue.
  • If you encounter any problems while downloading the definition updates, manually download them from here and just double-click on mbam-rules.exe to install.
On the Scanner tab:
  • Make sure the "Perform Quick Scan" option is selected.
  • Then click on the Scan button.
  • If asked to select the drives to scan, leave all the drives selected and click on the Start Scan button.
  • The scan will begin and "Scan in progress" will show at the top. It may take some time to complete so please be patient.
  • When the scan is finished, a message box will say "The scan completed successfully. Click 'Show Results' to display all objects found".
  • Click OK to close the message box and continue with the removal process.
Back at the main Scanner screen:
  • Click on the Show Results button to see a list of any malware that was found.
  • Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected.
  • When removal is completed, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab in MBAM.
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply. Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows MBAM's database version and your operating system.
  • Exit MBAM when done.
Note: If MBAM encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you will be asked to reboot your computer so MBAM can proceed with the disinfection process. If asked to restart the computer, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally (not into safe mode) will prevent MBAM from removing all the malware.

Scanning with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in safe or normal mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. MBAM is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, MBAM loses some effectiveness for detection & removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. Additionally, there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of MBAM but sometimes there is no alternative but to do a safe mode scan.

Note if installing in safe mode: For the same reasons indicated above, installing MBAM in safe mode is not advised. However, we understand in some instances there may be no other choice. If that is the case, after completing a safe mode scan it is recommended to uninstall MBAM, then reinstall it in normal mode and perform another scan.
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#3 mark2009

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 01:42 AM

Quietman7 - first of all thanks for replying to this mate. I appreciate the fact there are decent people out there willing to help those of us who are not so competent with computers.

So anyway I actually only got this after making some progress with the problem. Residing to the fact that I was going to reimage (and unsure whether someone would lend a hand here I not) I started preparing all my files and backing up. I then searched and deleted any files created around the time the bug hit. I then ran AVG, HiJack this, and spybot search and destroy and told it to fix everything, also ccleaner registry check, even though I didnt really know if it would get worse by deleting things it shouldnt. Much to my surprise the problem at least seems to have gone. I have just downloaded the program you linked me to and as a further check no problems were found.

I suspect the machine is still off a little bit though. For example I no longer get the AVG icon in the bottom right hand corner of my screen. I don't really know if its running or not.

Thanks again,

Mark

#4 quietman7

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 07:34 AM

I no longer get the AVG icon in the bottom right hand corner of my screen. I don't really know if its running or not.

Try reinstalling AVG or download a fresh copy, disconnet from the net, uninstall the old, reinstall the new, reconnect to the net and update.

also ccleaner registry check, even though I didnt really know if it would get worse by deleting things it shouldnt.

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
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#5 mark2009

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 04:40 PM

The reinstall did the trick. Appreciate what your are saying about the registry cleanup. :thumbsup:

Thanks again,

Mark

#6 quietman7

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:15 PM

You're welcome.

If there are no more problems or signs of infection, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Posted Image > Run... and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista and Disk Cleanup in Vista.

Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:

Keep Windows and Internet Explorer current with all critical updates from Microsoft which will patch many of the security holes through which attackers can gain access to your computer. If you're not sure how to do this, see Microsoft Update helps keep your computer current.

Avoid gaming sites, porn sites, pirated software, cracking tools, keygens, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs (i.e. Limewire, eMule, uTorrent). They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Malicious worms, backdoor Trojans IRCBots, and rootkits spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming, porn and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans, and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications.Beware of Rogue Security software as they are one of the most common sources of malware infection. They infect machines by using social engineering and scams to trick a user into spending money to buy a an application which claims to remove malware. For more specific information on how these types of rogue programs and infections install themselves, read:Keeping Autorun enabled on USB (pen, thumb, jump) and other removable drives has become a significant security risk due to the increasing number of malware variants that can infect them and transfer the infection to your computer. To learn more about this risk, please read:Many security experts recommend you disable Autorun asap as a method of prevention. Microsoft recommends doing the same.

...Disabling Autorun functionality can help protect customers from attack vectors that involve the execution of arbitrary code by Autorun when inserting a CD-ROM device, USB device, network shares, or other media containing a file system with an Autorun.inf file...

Microsoft Security Advisory (967940): Update for Windows Autorun

Other related reading sources:• Finally, if you need to replace your anti-virus, firewall or need a reliable anti-malware scanner please refer to:
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#7 mark2009

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 04:28 AM

Hi Quietman,

The 'bleeping' thing has returned. What I am finding is that the last bit of software I wanted to reinstall was 'anydvd' which is a simple backup utility for copyright material. When reinstalling anydvd wants to re-start my computer. I say yes, it then restarts and returns to the virus (100% use of resource, sometimes freeze or sometimes nasty blue screen with strange codes). I log again in safe mode, uninstall anydvd restart, and all 'appears' ok again. The anydvd is a purchased licence and was working fine before I got infected for over a year. The virus has the same symptoms and my gut feel it is being triggered again by the installing of anydvd as opposed to be related to the anydvd software itself. I'm leaning towards re-image to be free of it once and for all but am inexperienced and would prefer to get your opinion before going down that line.

All was looking well.....damn.

Any ideas?

Best regards,

Mark

#8 quietman7

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 06:49 AM

You can always restore with re-image but then you will never know for sure what the cause was. Before doing that I recommend you do the following:

Please read the pinned topic titled "Preparation Guide For Use Before Posting A Hijackthis Log". If you cannot complete a step, then skip it and continue with the next. In Step 6 there are instructions for downloading and running DDS which will create a Pseudo HJT Report as part of its log.

When you have done that, post your log in the HijackThis Logs and Malware Removal forum, NOT here, for assistance by the HJT Team Experts. A member of the Team will walk you through, step by step, on how to clean your computer. If you post your log back in this thread, the response from the HJT Team will be delayed because your post will have to be moved. This means it will fall in line behind any others posted that same day.

Start a new topic, give it a relevant title and post your log along with a brief description of your problem, a summary of any anti-malware tools you have used and a summary of any steps that you have performed on your own. An expert will analyze your log and reply with instructions advising you what to fix. After doing this, we would appreciate if you post a link to your log back here so we know that your getting help from the HJT Team.

Please be patient. It may take a while to get a response because the HJT Team members are very busy working logs posted before yours. They are volunteers who will help you out as soon as possible. Once you have made your post and are waiting, please DO NOT "bump" your post or make another reply until it has been responded to by a member of the HJT Team. Generally the staff checks the forum for postings that have 0 replies as this makes it easier for them to identify those who have not been helped. If you post another response there will be 1 reply. A team member, looking for a new log to work may assume another HJT Team member is already assisting you and not open the thread to respond.
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#9 mark2009

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 08:27 PM

Thanks for this. Finally have my machine sorted and running smooth again. The HJT team were able to rule out malware which had me back at the anydvd software (http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/forum22.html). I tried to reinstall it again and same deal - big blue screen no resources. Uninstalled and started searching on compatibility issues with this software. Yurns out ther are plenty and most suggestions were to get it to run in 'safe mode'. I am not sure what this does but i managed to turn it on and now things are back to normal.

What I am not sure of is how the compatiblility issue got triggered the same time that I downloaded my suspected malware (flash player update file). Anyway just happy to be up and running again.

I would have reimaged the whole computer for potentially the same problems when reinstalling so am thank
ful for all the help I have been given here..

All the best.

#10 quietman7

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 08:37 AM

You're welcome. Safe surfing and have a malware free day.
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