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Printer LAN without Internet Access


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5 replies to this topic

#1 istbar

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 06:54 PM

Greetings!
I would like to set up an old machine as a dedicated print server; i.e. connect all printers to one system (via USB) and use that system to print virtually from any of the other systems on the network.
The problem is, I've got 5 static IP address that are occupied by workstations, server, Vonage line, etc. Is it possible to operate an internet-free network running parallel to the connected network, or even better, have them all running on the same network (a combination of static IP's and dynamic perhaps??)?

I've got a router with plenty of available ports, another switch with plenty of ports and miles of network cable to make all this happen. All I lack is the know-how.
Running Windows XP everywhere (although I need to update the old machine with current Service Pack, et al). If I'm missing anything you need to come up with a solution, please let me know; I'll post with an update ASAP.

I'd like to avoid having to purchase additional IP addresses; I'm hoping for a cheap and easy fix.

Looking forward to any assistance you network masters can provide!


Cheers

istbar
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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 09:06 PM

You have 5 static IPs from a ISP? or You assigned them? I'm a little confused.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#3 istbar

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 03:49 PM

Yes. This is a small business and we've got a managed server set-up through Telus. They provided us with 5 static IP addresses (at whatever cost), and they are already in use (1 for our main server, 1 for our programmer's remote access, 1 for our VOIP line, and 1 for each of two workstations).
I'm trying to avoid purchasing additional static IP addresses.

istbar
'You tried and you failed. The lesson is never try.'

#4 CaveDweller2

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 03:15 PM

Your setup has me a bit baffled as to why you would pay for 5 static IPs. This is why routers were invented and NAT was developed. So you could have 1 static IP, a router and all info would pass through the router.

Are you actually doing a print server or are you just going to hook a USB printer to a XP machine and share it?

Do the remote users need to print?

I believe to do what you want with your current setup you'd need 2 network interface cards(NICs) in each machine, connect that NIC to the router, connect the print server machine to the same router and then share it. Installing drivers where they are needed.

Now just for my own curiosity, who set this all up for this office? And why did they set it up that way? :thumbsup:

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#5 istbar

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 01:40 PM

Ok, so I've let this lapse a bit because things have been crazy here at work.
CaveDweller2, thank you for putting up with my ignorance and trying to get to the bottom of this.

I think I need to clarify a couple things. First, the Router we were provided by Telus has 4 ports, but only 1 of them is active. I have a switch that has plenty of available ports. As for the number of static IP addresses, I think it is a package of 5, I don't think we're paying for individual static IP's. The reason for the static IP in the first place: we have a server that is being set up to run a nifty bit of software (primarily used for construction) allowing a number of simultaneous users to log in and view/update a project database (this is sort of parallel to our own internal network, I think we may end up using this server for all of our internal files eventually, but we want them to be separate for now).

All I want for the 'print server' is to hook up a bunch of printers via USB to one machine and then print on whichever printer from whichever workstation. I'm only looking to have printing capability from the local network (myself and our few employees within the office), rather than anyone who logs onto the server.

I think I need more router ports to make this work, as you mentioned the reason 'why routers were invented and NAT was developed'. Let us assume that I can not activate the remaining ports on the existing router, can I add another router to this setup? (ie, wall > telus router > our router > workstations/print server/etc.).

Again, many thanks for your help on this. Please don't tear all of your hair out dealing with me ;)
Looking forward to your response.

Cheers
istbar

Edited by istbar, 23 November 2009 - 01:40 PM.

'You tried and you failed. The lesson is never try.'

#6 Baltboy

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 01:18 PM

I'm trying to picture the setup here. I'm assuming you have everything connected to the switch and the switch connected to the router? If that is the case then all you have to do is the following:
1.go to the advanced properties of each computer that will use the printers and add an additional IP address of 192.168.1.xxx
2.install the new computer with the printers and give it an address in the 192.168.1.xxx range
3. share the printers and innstall the needed drivers on each computer that will use them

I would opt to use network enabled printers if they are available to you. They don't require another computer and are very easy to set up.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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