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few questoins about building a gaming computer


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#1 1computernoob

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 12:45 AM

i am new to messing with computers but have been contemplating building a gaming computer.

my question is this:

I have heard that if you built a bad ass one then in 6 month - 1 year it would no longer be so bad ass. i heard that theycome out with so much new bleep that building a computer can get very expensive if you try to keep your computer as awesome as when you originally bought it.

so how long can i get out of a computer that i build until it is not AS great any more? how often do i have to buy new bleep to keep it just as good as day 1?

Thanks :thumbsup:

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#2 IrishGrimReaper

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 05:56 AM

Bigger and better computer stuff comes out all the time. You can't keep up unless you're willing to spend big money.

Buy something top of the range now and it'll last a good 3 years, it won't be the best thing after 3 years but you can't change that unless you keep buying.

Edited by IrishGrimReaper, 01 October 2009 - 05:57 AM.

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#3 dpunisher

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 12:45 PM

You got to go in with a plan.

Plan on upgrades when you build as your hardware will indeed be obsolete in 12 to 18 months if you are a serious gamer. You have to deal with that. Videocards are replaced most often, usually followed by the CPU.

Get the basics right. Get a top of the line power supply, hard drive, optical drives and case that will deal with your future needs. The idea is to try to get future upgrades cut down to videocard, motherboard, CPU, and memory.

Get a motherboard/chipset/socket that has an upgrade path. Some sockets/chipsets are end of life (Core2/Socket775). DDR3 memory is the standard for the next couple of years. Intel socket 1156/AMD AM3 will be around for at least 24 months, likely longer. A good 1156 or AM3 board will support the next round of faster CPUs.

It is rare you can go into a build knowing it will play every game released in the next 24 months. With planning you can keep your upgrades down to ~$400 US/yr on average, and have a nearly state of the art system that will play whatever you throw at it.

EDIT: I forgot about turning over your used parts. I sell my old parts on Craigslist or EBay. For whatever reason people pay way too much for used parts, oh well.

Edited by dpunisher, 01 October 2009 - 12:47 PM.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 05:46 PM

that is true but it doesnt mean its a bad computer after 6 months. I built my computer when the AMD athlon x2 6000+ was the BEST AMD chip on the market, and purchased the my video card (an ati 3870 x2) when it was considered the best, and right now their both "obsolete" by todays standards. However, in all reality its not, cuz that setup will still run pretty much any game on the market with good graphics and a playable frame rate. Quad cores are insanely fast, but the software hasnt totally caught up to them yet, and most games (not counting Crysis) are not setup to fully utilize a quat yet anyway, and even the ones that are will still run on a dual. What I like to do with computers is build the best system I can afford at the time, and the best system today, should last me several years, even if 2 years down the road its no longer considered "high end" it will still do the job. :D

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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